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QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Vol. XIV. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, 1921 



No. 1 



L OPENING College Night Best in Years PROF. BOWEN HEADS 

OF MILLSAPS COLLEGE FACULTY STUNT POPULAR— CARR AND LOWE 

WIN APPLAUSE 



NEW DEPARTMENT 



Judge Sydney Smith Deliv- 
ers Address to 
Students 



With an enrollment far exceeding 
former records, Millsaps College 
opened its doors last Wednesday 
morning for the thirtieth session. The 
exercises officially marking this 
event happened at 10:30. President 
A. F. Watkins presided over the meet- 
ing, which occurred in the chapel, and 
delivered a brief introduction to the 
program. The gist of his remarks was 
that the school has steadily grown 
since its founding, and is now about to 
catch Its full stride as a well devel- 
oped man. 

The gathered students with the 
many visitors from the city united in 
the singing of a religious song and 
then “America.” Rev. M. L. Burton 
lead prayer. Mrs. Cassedy Holden 
delighted the audience with her sing- 
ing, in which she was accompanied by 
Mrs. Chas. Heald at the piano and 
Mrs. Huron Hutchinson with the vio- 
lin. 

The opening addiess of the session 
was delivered by Chief Justice Syd- 
ney Smith, of the Supreme Court. 
Judge Smith used as his theme “The 
Key to a Full, Square Life.” He of- 
fered much useful advic6 in the mat- 
ter of outlining the schedule for a life- 
time. His outline, he said, was taken 
from the recent book, “The American- 
ization of Edward Bok.” A life should 
be divided into three sections. The 
first is that of education and prepar- 
ation. The second is that in which 
one should accumulate wealth to the 
extent that he would no longer have 
to work ’ally to secure a living. The 
third is that in which one should do 
that thing which he likes best and in 
the doing of which he can erve hu- 
manity best. These rules ai for the 
ordinary business man and not for the 
preacher or teacher who makes his 
whole life a continuous service. 

Various members of the clergy of 
Jackson were given opportunity to 
invite the students to their churches 
and Sunday schools. This they did 
many of them at the same time poking 
a little fun at one another. Mr. Fred- 
erick Sullens, editor of the Daily News 
made a short talk in which he spoke 
on the athletic situation. He ex- 
pressed a desire to speak to the team 
later on. His interest in football is 
opportune, because it shows that the 
city is ready to back Millsaps College 
on the field. 

Before the meeting came to an end 
Coach Freeland took the platform for 
a short *Jlk. He spoke a few' words 
of optimistic tone, announced the first 
practice, and sat down amidst the ap- 
plause of the audience. Prof. Bowen, 
the occupant of the new chair ol 
Christian education, also talked brief- 
ly on his pleasure at being here this 
year. After a few announcements 
the gathering was permitted to dis- 
perse. 



Monday night, September 19th, the avails himself of all the roads to im- 
annual "College Night” of Millsaps j provement. 



was held, with an attendance which 
proved it was a meeting of the col- 
lege. Dr. Mitchell, who presided in 
his usual grace and a gorgeous silk 
shirt, explained to the freshmen (the 
largest part of the audience) the pur- 
pose of the meeting — its work of giv- 
ing early and general publicity to the 
various college activities. It is not so 
much for the good of the two Christian 
associations, the literary societies, the 



The program was opened with a solo 
by Miss Ollie Beamon. Then Dr. Mitch- 
ell called on Mr. Watson, as president 
of the Y. W. C. A., to make a short 
talk in the interests of the organiza- 
tion. Investigation showed that Doc 
had gotten his wires crossed, and that 
Watson was nothing more than head 
of the Y. M. C. A., but he took advan- 
take of the opportunity to appear on 
the platform and deliver a snappy in- 



athletic organizations, etc., that the vitation to the new men to join the 
co-operation of the freshmen is solic- j <«y >■ 

ited, as for the benefit of the afore- Miss Daley Crawford represented 
mentioned freshmen. A successful col- < t jj e y. w. C. A. and gave the girls an 
lege man is one who is prominent in invitation that should have moved the 
the activities of the college and really j (Continued on Page 2) 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

October 8 — Howard College at Birmingham 

October 15 — University of Miss at Oxford 

October 22 — State Normal College at Jackson 

November 5 — Birmingham Sou. College at Jackson 

November 11 — Miss. College „ at Jackson 

November 24 — Univ. of Tennessee Medical College 

at Jackson 



Alabamian to Fill the Chair 
of Religious Ed- 
ucation 



MILLSAPS. ACADEMY W. STOKES TO HEAD 

BEGINS SESSION SENIOR CLASS OF ’22 



Many 1920-21 Athletes Back Mack Swearingen and Bur 

ton Ford Elected to Put 
Out Bobashel t 



The “old” Dormitory is alive with 
the 1921-22 preps. There are pros- 
pects of a most successful jrear in 
every phase of “prep” activity, and a 
spirit of enthusiasm and geniality per- 
vades Millsaps Academy. 

Sunday and Monday last week saw 
the advance students of the year ar- 
riving, headed by a c’i”her of old men 
who were anxious to be present at the 
first signs of life on the old familiar 
Academy grounds. This is a distinc- 
tive feature of the Academy of which 
it is justly proud — the old men come 
back in proportionately large numbers 
This attests the successful character 
of work done and the pleasing fea- 
tures of Academy' life. The Prep 
School is not an annual housing place 
for restless incorrigibles who nass on 
the next year to another school. “The 
old preps will come back.” 

Wednesday was opening day. Prof 
Ferguson, after making a short talk to 
the students assembled in the Chapel 
dismissed them in order that all might 
attend the opening exercises at the 
college. 

In athletics, the outlook is especially 
pleasing. Seven or eight men of last 
year’s victorious football squad are 
back, including Reynolds and Chal- 
fant from Arkansas, Smtton. "Chick” 
Nelson. Hooker, Kornegay, and others. 
Also there is much good new material. 
The first game is with the college and 
the preps are training hard and ex- 
pecting nothing but victory. 



At the annual class election held 
Tuesday morning ©’clock, the 

Senior Class officers for 

the ensuing y5n\ Walter Stokes 
was chosen as president, after a con- 
test in which A. W. Bailey and Fred 
Lotterhos were his opponents. Stokes 
is a man well able to lead the class 
in all of its official operations. Miss 
Daley Crawford was elected vice 
president over A. W. Bailey by a vote 
of 11 to 9. The third officer elected 
was also a girl. Miss Grace McMul- 
len was selected as secretary-treasurer 
over Burton Ford and Bert Crisler, 
after a second race with the former. 

Perhaps the most important offices 
to be filled at this election were edi- 
tor and business manager of the Boba- 
shela, the Millsaps year-boo^ pub- 
lished by the Senior Class. Mack 
Swearingen was elected unanimously 
to fill the position of editor, and it is 
generally understood that he is excep- 
tionally well qualified to make the 
annual a literary success. As his run- 
ning partner in the office of business 
manager. Burton Ford was chosen. 
Ford is the kind of man that will put 
his best into the work, and the Senior 
Class may feel safe with its business 
in his hands. His rivals in the elec- 
tion were W. N. Ware and M, M 
McGowan. 



Millsaps College is doubly fortunate 
this year in having a new department 
installed, the money for the endow- 
ment of which was given by Mr. W. F. 
S. Tatum, of Hattiesburg, and in hav- 
ing such a man as Prof. Cawthon A. 
Bowen to head this new work. Prof. 
Bowen is pre-eminently qualified for 
his work in religious education, for 
it is due to him that that department 
in the Woman’s College at Montgom- 
ery, which college he is leaving to 
come here, was the largest and most 
successful of its kind in Southern 
Methodism. 

Prof. Bowen was born in Holly 
Springs, Miss. When he started to 
college he turned his face towards 
Millsaps, and entered as a freshman 
in 1902. In 1904 he left Millsaps, and 
took up work at Emory College, in Ox- 
ford, Georgia, where he graduated af- 
ter two years. Immediately he went 
to Vanderbilt and took up post-gradu- 
ate work, finishing his course there m 
1908. He then joined th> North 
Alabama conference of the bo’Jthern 
Methodist church, and served as a pas- 
tor for seven years. At the end of this 
period he left the itinerancy to organ-’ 
ize and become the head of the De- 
partment of Religious Education in 
Montgomery Woman’s College. Since 
that time, until his recent election to 
membership in the faculty at Millsaps. 
he has held that position and built 
up that department to such a degree 
of usefulness that he was rewarded 
last year by being elected vice-presi- 
dent of the institution. . 

Prof. Bowen’s chief interest seems, 
to lie in-. #fork among the younger peo- 
ple of the church, which work is a vi- 
tal part of the course. He is a Sunday 
school organizer and authority, and is 
president of the Epworth League in 
tnis section. He also is responsible 
for an organized student govern- 
ment that works at Woman’s College, 
and is a believer in honor systems 
as the most successful way to control 
a student body and secure at the 
same time a high development of 
character. It is his belief that as de- 
velopers of character they have no 
equal, and it is his hope that a work- 
ing student government can be start- 
ed at Millsaps. 

The courses in religious education, 
so Professor Bowen says, are most dis- 
tinctly not for ministerial students 
only. These courses are of interest- 
ing and educational value to every stu- 
dent, and his department will be a 
great disappointment to him if it is 
set aside for those specializing in 
church work. He intends to arouse in 
the schood so intense an interest in 
his subjects that no person shall feel 
like he has really graduated without 
attending at least one of his classes: 
and no one who has f »lked an hour 
with Professor Bowen n doubt that 
(Continued on page 3) 




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PROF. HAMILTON 
TO STUDY AT UNIV. 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 



To the regret of his many friends, 
Prof. A. P. Hamilton, of the Depart- 
ment of German, will not be at Mill- 
saps this year. However, he is gone 
only temporarily. He will take up 
work in the Graduate School of the 
University of Pennsylvania in order to 
attain a Ph.D. degree. He will also 
be an instructor in Latin at the Uni 
versity. 

Prof. Hamilton has always been 
very prominent in the activities of the 
college, taking especial interest in the 
glee club, of which he and Dr. Mitch- 
ell have been the leaders. For this 
reason he will be missed greatly by 
the students. 

The city of Jackson will also feel 
Prof. Hamilton’s absence, because he 
has delighted them with his splendid 
voice on many occasions. For several 
years he has taken a leading part in 
developing the choirs at the two city 
Methodist churches. 

Prof. Hamilton will surely receive 
a warm welcome next June when he 
arrives to take up work in the summer 
school. 



Y. W. C. A. PROSPECTS 



The Y. W. C. A. at Millsaps is now 
starting its third year. During these 
years it has grown — slowly yet surely; 
and this year, it is hoped, will be the 
best in its history. 

Last year the girls sent four repre- 
sentatives to the Y. W. C. A. confer- 
ence qt Montreal, N. C. ’Awe girls— 
Belle Lindsay, Eleanor Gene Sullivan, 
Anna Belle Craft and Kathryn Howie 
— have brought back an unlimited 
amount of pep and expect to get the 
entire bunch inoculated in a short 
time. A definite outline of work for 
the year has been made, and it is 
interesting to know that some of the 
very best speakers in and but of “Y” 
circles are scheduled to be here dur- 
ing the year. An interesting as well 
as instructive line of study is to be 
taken up during the weekly meetings, 
and the cabinet expects every co-ed at 
Millsaps to do her part on each pro- 
gram. 

The girls in school this year are 
better prepared to assist in the build- 
ing and moulding^ of the “Y” than any 
bunch of girls who have attended 
Millsaps, because they are girls who 
have been connected with the “Y” at 
Millsaps previous to this year, girls 
who have been interested in other col- 
lege “Y's”, and girls who have aided 
in a large measure to make the Hi Y 
of our high schools just what it is to- 
day. 

The Hut is even more attractive this 
year than last year and will, as previ- 
ously fill a needed place in every col- 
lege girl’s life. 



Virginia Raises Money for Gym. 

The first night's canvass for the 
$300,000 gym for the University of 
Virginia, netted $44,398 in pledges. A 
law student who will hang out his 
shingle in June, made the following 
remark in writing out his pledge: 
“You can put me down for $300; if 
I can’t wring that much out of the 
cold, cruel world above a decent liv- 
ing within the next five years I might 
as well quit.” — College Topics. 

Examination is the absence of things 
honed for and the substance of things 
'crrctten. — High Life. 



College Night Best in Years 

(Continued from Page 1) 



sphinx. No less than sphinx-like are 
the girls she was talking to, so her 
touching vein was in order. 

Dr. Mitchell then took possession of 
the floor again and held on to it a 
while; he recited a poem on pep from 
the repertoire of Charley Butler. He 
announced a number named “Carlo,” 
stating that he was not responsible 
for anything that might happen. This 
feast proved to be a black-face num- 
ber by Red Carr and A. B. Lowe. To 
say that these comedians were good 
would be useless ; suffice it to say that 
they were as black as any professional 
minstrels ever seen and that they 
gained tumultous applause. 

The merits and usefulness of the lit- 
erary societies were presented by 
Mack Swearingen, with a demonstra- 
tion of the stage presence acquired at 
the Lamar Literary Society. Dewitt 
Mullins in the part of "A Boob from 
Booneville” gave two most touching 
songs. The Purple and White, * the 
best paper in Millsaps College and the 
best college paper in the state, got in 
a few words through the mouth of its 
editor-in-chief, Fred Lotterhos. 

But the girls were silent throughout 
the evening. Even in their number on 
the stage, they gave a Pocahontas 
Pantomime, although they owed much 
to the assistance of others. Some his- 
trionic ability was displayed, and the 
ranks of our co-eds may be thinned 
by the enterprising Mack Sennett. 

The faculty received an opportunity 
to talk and it was gotten off in a most 
convenient way. Each professor 
spoke on the subject nearest to his 
heart, and none interfered with the 
rest, because they spoke simultaneous- 
ly. It has been suggested that some 
such plan be adopted at chapel in or 
der to save time. Dr. Sullivan, in this 
trial, proved to be the best orator be- 
cause he held out the longest, althohgb 
Professor Lin was a close second. 
However, Coach Freeland proved the 
superiority of matter over mind by 
carrying Dr. Sullivan away with his 
flood of muscle. 

E. K. Windham spoke for athletics 
as the captain of the football team. He 
expressed a desire to build up a sec 
ond team that would beat Mississippi 
College, while the first team is away 
playing real football teams. At this 
stage the meeting was turned over to 
the popular and big-mouthed cheer 
leader, Walter Stokes. After a few 
peppy yells the crowd dispersed to 
drink the punch that had been provid- 
ed upstairs. Not the least delightful 
part of the evening was the opportu- 
nity thus given to improve acquaint- 
ance with new friends. 



GALLOWAYS HOLD FIRST SESSION 

M. L. McCormick called the house to 
order and Rev. E. A. King, a graduate 
of last year’s class, led in the opening 
prayer at the first meeting of the Gal- 
loway Literary Society last Friday. 

Mr. McCormick then spoke on the 
object of the literary society, quoting 
the basis of his theme from the consti- 
tution. He then introduced to the 
house Dr. King, who delivered the ad- 
dress of the evening. 

The following officers were elected: 

J. W. Sells, president; A. W. Bailey, 
vice-president; D. W. Poole, secre- 
tary; E. W. Brown, assistant secre- 
tary; W. S. Phillips, treasurer. 

W. N. Ware moved that the time be 
extended for impromptu debates and 
the motion w-as carried, the debate be^ 
ing, “Resolved: That freshmen should 
wear green caps.” The negative won 
and the house adjourned. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



New Matron for Burton and 
Galloway Halls. 

Mrs. Mattie C. Thompson to 
Be in Charge 

Among the other additions to the 
attractions at Millsaps, we must give 
special mention to the matron at the 
new dormitories, who is filling Mrs. 
Joyce’s place so successfully. As 
bad as we felt over the withdrawal oi 
Mrs. Joyce, we are glad that we are 
now to be “mothered” by such an able 
and delightful successor as Mrs. 
Thompson. Mrs. Thompson has a de- 
gree in home science work from the 
Mississippi State College for Women 
and from Columbia University, which 
equips her perfectly for her place at 
Millsaps. For several years she has 
been the teacher of home science at 
Belhaven College and will be wel- 
comed at Millsaps as much for her 
sweet nature and perpetual good hu- 
mor as for her undoubted usefulness 
and help to the boys. Mrs. Thomp- 
son's home has always been in Jack- 
son, and she is already known to the 
home boys and to most of the board- 
ing boys, so that she will not even 
for a day feel like a stranger. We 
hope to see her often, we hope that 
she never has any trouble, and we 
want to tell her that we are glad to 
have her at Millsaps. 

Pres. Watson Announces 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

. The first official act of J. F. Watson, 
president of the Y. M. C. A. this year, 
was to call a cabinet meeting for the 
discussion of plans for the “Y” pro- 
gram this session. At this meeting, 
Watson announced his newly selected 
cabinet. A list of the committee chair- 
men follows: 

Forum — W. N. Ware. 

Program — M. L. McCormick. 

Missions — E. O. Baird. 

Bible Study — F. J. Lotterhos. 

Finance — W. E. Stokes. 

Publicity — H. B. Collins. 

Social — E. W. Brooks. 

All of these men are experienced in 
the Y. M. C. A. work here, and are 
well qualified to carry on the pro- 
gram for this year. 

The Y. M. C. A. announces that it 
is in existence for the sole purpose ot 
serving the students of this college. 
This desire was demonstrated in the 
efforts of the president and his help- 
ers to meet all new comers at the 
trains to help them in getting to the 
college. Such things as this are the 
way in which the “Y” wishes to serve 
the students, besides offering the 
benefits of the Friday night programs, 
the Forum discussions, the Bible study 
courses, the college night entertain- 
ment, and other activities. 

Y. W. C. A. ENTERTAINS AT GYPSY 
TEA. 

The girls of the Y. W. C. A. enter- 
tained at a Gypsy Tea for the girls 
who are attending Millsaps College for 
the first time last Saturday after- 
noon. It was the first social func- 
tion of the year under the direction 
of the Association, and not being an 
ultra-fashionable affair it was in re- 
ality an enjoyable get-acquainted 
party. 

Miss Lucile Nail in gypsy costume 
served tea while sandwiches and other 
“goodies” were served in picnic style. 
Various games were played until twi- 
light; and when good-byes were ex- 
changed each new girl assured the 
hostesses that all “Y” socials of the 
year would be looked forward to with 
pleasant anticipation. 



Prof. Bowen Heads New 
Department 

(Continued from Page 1) 
this condition will soon be existent on 
the campus. 

This is due to the fact that besides 
being admirably equipped for his 
work here as far as training is con- 
cerned, Professor Bowen is also a 
delightful gentleman. His work will 
prove to be different and thoroughly 
alive. A class will meet on Sunday 
mornings for training in Sunday 
school work, with a class of girls un- 
der Mrs. Bowen. Professor Bowen 
expressed much satisfaction at the 
fact that there is no class dis- 
tinction at Millsaps between the min- 
isters and the other students, that 
they are all students and draw no 
line of differentiation. He also said 
that he looked forward to his work 
with the greatest pleasurq. His work 
among the boys is entirely new to 
him, he having been in a woman ’s 
college for six or seven years, but he 
is looking ahead with the keenest ex- 
pectation and no little interest to what 
developments might take place and 
what adjustments might be neces- 
sary among boys, instead of girls. 

S'uch additions to the college as 
Professor Bowen will always help. His 
Christianity is the cheerful, smiling 
kind. Millsaps is glad to see him, wel- 
comes him, and assures him co-opera- 
tion and succeess. 

MILLSAPS SUMMER 
SCHOOL 

The Millsaps Summer School opened 
Monday, June 13th, 1921, with an en- 
rollment of 41 students. The State 
High School Normal opened the same 
date with an enrollment of 111 stud- 
ents. The two schools were held un- 
der the joint direction of Prof. G. 
L. Harrell, of Millsaps College, and 
trot. r . b. woodley, of nattiesourg. 

in tne Millsaps Summer scnooi, 
courses were offered in Latin, Green, 
french, Spanish, mathematics and 
chemistry. Credit to the amount of six 
hours was allowed for work completed 
in the summer school, and college 
credit to the amount of tnree hours 
was allowed for work done in the nor- 
mal school. The courses offered in 
the normal school were arranged to 
meet the needs of the different stud- 
ents, who sought work for high 
school credit, work toward license, 
and college credit. Two subjects 
were the maximum given in the sum- 
mer school to one student and the min- 
imum allowed to students in the nor- 
mal, whose maximum was three sub- 
jects. 

Happily, the student body contained 
some gifted musicians and singers, 
and many happy hours were spent in 
the living room of Galloway Hall 
with these entertainers. Many de- 
lightful swimming parties fvere en- 
joyed at Lake Livingston at various 
times. About the first of July, a num- 
ber of the students enjoyed a trip to 
Vicksburg and on their return re- 
ported a most delightful time. On the 
Fourth of July a splendid patriotic pro- 
gram followed by a watermelon cut- 
ting was enjoyed by the majority of 
the students. A tennis tournament 
which created considerable interest 
was a feature of the summer. ‘ 

The summer school and normal com- 
bined gave Millsaps a great adver- 
tisement. Many teachers throughout 
the state were brought in connection 
with Millsaps for the first time and 
realized its wonderful opportunities 
and possibilities. Some of those who 
were at Millisaps last summer for the 
first time are now enrolled in the col- 
lege as regular students and are well 
pleased with the place. 



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I THE DANIEL STUDIO 



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’J -2* 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 

Additional Subscription. 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Saturday. 



Editor-in-Chief 


STAFF 


Athletic Editor.. .... 


















_ ......... _ .... __ J. W. Sells 


Associate Editor 


— - M. M. McGowan 



REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer. 

MANAGEMENT 

Business Manager w b. Collins 

Assistant Business Manager Geo. Whtts 

Circulation Manager G. K. Hebert 



ARE YOU A FRESHMAN? 




This space reserved for 
THE EMPORIUM 




If you can answer “yea” to the query at the top of this column, 
we wish here and now to shake your hand, editorially speaking. You 
are the plentiful material that gives Millsaps College a future. You 
are the person that puts life and spirit into all that happens around 
the campus. This is true if you are the kind of freshman we believe 
you to be. We believe you to be a worker, a booster, and a believer. 
Y our success here is assured if you are these three things, if you work 
hard at your books and on the athletic field, if you boost Millsaps Col- 
lege from now till you die, and if you believe in it to the point that 
it gets your fullest loyalty. 

Service of this kind to the school is going to be easy for you when 
you get the right vision of the Millsaps spirit. That vision comes 
through living on the campus. Millsaps men are loyal, they stick to- 
gether. they are friendly. A school is not great because of its size. 
Its greatness is because of the quality of its men and its work. These 
two — the men and the work — make Millsaps what it is. You are a 
part of the group which determines the quality of the college. When 
you are out in public, the college is measured by your actions. Act 
accordingly. 

We are glad you are here, but we expect you to be loyal to the 
old school in every way, and we want you to strive to lift Millsaps up 
by your presence. 

The absence of a football editorial this week does not mean that 
we are not interested. You will hear from us later and plenty. 

OUR POLICY 

I 

The Purple and White is owned by the student body, and opera- 
ted through a literary council by a staff. The management and pol- 
icy of the paper rests upon that staff. Therefore, we feel that it is 
only fair that some statement of that policy should be presented in 
this initial issue of the session. The students should know what to 
expect from their paper. 

Our purpose might be briefly stated in the following outline : 

1. To publish the news of Millsaps College. 

2. To support Millsaps with full loyalty. 

3. To entertain our readers. 

4. To encourage writing among the students. 

5. To keep up contact with other schools. 

We are honestly trying to make this the best college paper in 
Mississippi this year. To do that we need the support of the stu- 
dents. We need the help of all those who can write well. We need 
the constructive criticism of all our readers. In order to encourage 
writing for the paper, the Clark Essay Medal is offered at the close 
of school, and this year there will be a gold coin prize for the best 
short story submitted. Full announcement of these two awards will 
be published soon. All those who desire to write for the paper — 
freshmen included — will be given an opportunity, if they will give us 
their names. Make your criticisms to us also, and we shall be glad 
to profit by them. 

We ask your cooperation, support, and interest; and we promise 
pou our best efforts. 




Correct Clothes 
for College Men 



Harris 9 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Pant a zt 
Cafe 

Jackson’s Pride 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

CLEANLINESS 

WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 

All kinds of 
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in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



Jackson Paper Company 



P ‘ The Only Wholesale P 

A Paper House in A 

P Mississippi. P 

E SCHOOL SUPPLIES E 

R Our Specialty R 



JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

H. T. NEWELL, Manager 
120 S. Gallatin Street 

Telephone 106 JACKSON, MISS. 







THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 










#tralforft Cloth r* 



When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

^tratforb Clotijes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




Found in Millsaps College. 



A place to go in swimming — Poole. 

The smallest member of a family 
of three — Triplett 

A great English poet — Scott. 

A female relative and a piece of 
baggage — Sistrunk. 

A big animal — Hebert. 

Of use to a hunter — Gunn. 

An animal of the desert — Campbell. 

Great preachers — Galloway Bros. & 
Jones. 

A place for the telephone — Booth. 

A hungry man’s friend — Cooke. 

Something poets write about — Bal- 
lard. 

Different makes of cars — Hudson, 
Ford, and Chandler. 

A freshman that’s red — Allred 

An exalted late admiral of the Brit- 
ish Navy — Nelson. 

A thing that you roll — Ball. 

A bird — Martin. 

A vehicle — Carr. 

A great movie actor — Hart. 

Something that is put on graves as 
sweet remembrances — Flowers. 

One who harps — Harper. 

A relative of our former President 
— Wilson. 

A great Southern General— Lee. 

A man who works on pipes — Plum- 
mer. 



Miss Allee Pate, a last year’s grad- 
uate of M. S. C. W. and a leader at 
that college, has matriculated for ad- 
ditional work at Millsaps this year. 



Mrs. James Sells has the distinction 
of being the first married woman to 
matriculate at Millsaps College. 



OCOODCOOOOOOXOODOOOOOODOD 

FORUM 

OOOOOCOOOOCOC030DOOODOOD03 
A Plea From the Ill-Fated “Century 
Club." 

It is with pangs of regret that we 
receive the news of the closing of the 
“roost” this year at the Century. The 
news is especially disagreeable to 
those old students who have spent 
many happy hours watching from such 
perilous heights the presentations of 
comedy and drama. 

The time honored custom must now 
be abandoned — the “roost” is closed. 

Plans had been laid this year to 
fully organize the student body into 
a “Century Club” and to elect officers, 
a president, vice-president, treasurer 
and monitor. 

The duties of the president would 
have been to call the Club to order at 
each performance at the play house, 
to see that order was preserved and 
to assume a presidential mien gen- 
erally. 

The duties of the vice-president 
would have been to stand by the 
president and to see that no personal 
violence was meted out to him by 
some dissatisfied member of the club. 
In the absence of the president, the 
vice-president would have assumed 
his duties. 

Weekly dues would have been col- 
lected, a minimum of twenty-five 
cents, to pay the admission fee of 
each member. By these small weekly 
payments no sudden strain would have 
been placed on any purse. 

The treasurer would have had 
charge of all funds and would have 
seen to the purchase of all tickets. 

The duties of the monitor would 
have been to see that all members 
obtained seats and to call the roll* at 
each meeting. 

All, however, is now a dream, a 
bursted bubble — the “roost” is closed. 

The reason assigned by the man- 
agement was that the crowd was too 
noisy, too rowdy. We of Millsaps 
know, of course, that these unkind 
remarks were not meant for us. There 
are some from the city who go to 
the “roost” and who seem to consider 
it their duty to make as much noise 
as possible to attract attention. We 
ourselves agree with the management 
tkat this conduct is very ungentle- 
manly. 

All is not lost, though. The power 
of petition is still open to us. A pe- 
tition, setting forth our grievances, 
signed by all students, with the ap- 
proval of the faculty, may have a 
great deal of weight in convincing 
those at the head of the play-house 
that Millsaps men are gentlemen and 
know how to behave as such. 

The privileges of the “Roost,” 
through this means, may be opened 
to us at least. 

— A Rooster. 



Vandy Adopts Student Activity Fee 
System. 

The students of Vanderbilt have 
adopted the Activity Fee System pro- 
viding that each student on matricu- 
lation shall pay an activity fee. This 
fee will be fifteen dollars and will 
cover Y. M. C. A. dues and Literary 
fees. Each student shall also receive 
in return for this fee an annual pass 
to every football, baseball, basketball, 
track, tennis and swimming meet, and 
will receive all of the college publica- 
tions including the annual at the time 
of their appearance. 



Millsaps is progressing, a new chair 
has been added to the barber shop. 



This space reserved for 
KENNINGTON’S 



H* T. Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



i 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY J 

Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods | 





MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



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I FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE j 

Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. j 

1 South State Street JACKSON, MISS. | 

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PHI MU GIRLS RECEIVE INFORM- 
ALLY. 

The Phi Mu room was the scene of 
merriment and joy on the opening 
morning of school. The young ladies 
of that organization were the host- 



esses at an informal reception, receiv- 
ing as guests many of the new co-eds 
and a number of the students of last 
year. Tasty refreshments were 
served in the form of punch, sand- 
wiches and candy. 



1 



6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Football Outlook Bright 

Thirty Men Out For This* 

Year’s Purple and E. Y. FREELAND — A 

White Eleven COACH TO SWEAR BY 



The Majors got under way last J “I do not wish to be connected 
Wednesday afternoon when the first with a team that is the laughing 
practice of the season took place on stock of every one we meet.” Thus 



the athletic field. Coach Freeland has 
had the squad going through light 
practice this past week. At first 
glance, the prospects for a successful 
team look very slim, owing to the lack 
of weight of the new men who are out 
for the team and to the failure of 
some of the old men to return who 
were with us last year. However, 
there seem to be a number of real 
fast men in the squad, and if any 
heavy men come in soon to strengthen 
the line the Purple and White ma- 
chine under Coach Freeland’s able 
guidance will be a credit to our in- 
stitution. We cannot expect to put 
out a team that will win many games 
this year, for this is really our first 
season in the football world. We are 



saith Coach Freeland. And by the 
way this characterizes his attitude to- 
ward the college and toward the team. 

Seen on the football field while he 
is driving the prospects through the 
afternoon’s work, he reminds one 
very much of a bulldog in his actions. 
His nick-name should be “Bulldog” 
Freeland. Have you ever noticed a 
bulldog in his unhampered actions, 
how he takes in all the work to be 
done, then decides what should be 
done, then drives at it with all his 
propelling power and force and sticks 
to it till it is done? That is the way 
Coach Freeland works. He is straight; 
he is fair. He will give every man a 
square deal, and requires as much in 
return. As one man expressed it 



willing to predict, however, that this : when asked what Coach would do if a 
year’s eleven will be better than the ] man broke training, “Put him off the 



team that represented us last year.. 

The following old men of last year’s 
machine have returned and will form 
a nucleus for this year’s’ team; 
Windham (Capt.), center; Mussel- 
white and Campbell, ends; Fowler, 
halfback; Scott, guard; Culley, Mc- 
Ewen and King, tackles; Reeves and 
Stovall, fullbacks. With this bunch of 
huskies to form the backbone of this 
year’s machine we are going to have 
a very good team. Windham at center 
ought to have a good year, for “M. & 
O” was the life of the team last year 
and all that he lacked was experience. 

Greit things are expected from Sto- 
vall, who was handicapped last sea- 
son by being sick. He and Reeves will 
fight it out for fullback. The rest of 
last year’s squad are all husky men 
and ought to have gained much from 
last year’s experience. With some 
good coaching this year we expect 
them to be able to hold their own with 
any of the opposing elevens. 

Among the new men who are show- 
ing up well are Tate, Carre Galloway, 
Pat McNair, and Lilly. All of thesq, 



team.” That is what a man may ex 
pect, too. When he is directing the 
practice, one would think he is soft 
and easy to get along with. He is, as 
long as you deliver the goods, but 
when you fail to ! ! ! ! ! ! 

Millsaps is proud to have a coach 
that played on Vandy’s team for three 
and a half years and never missed a 
down during the entire time — one that 
in a game with Yale had four men 
sent in to hold him, all of whom failed. 
Coach Freeland turned out a winning 
team at Austin College in Texas, and 
if given time and the men will do so 
here. But as he says, “We must not 
expect to walk before we begin to 
crawl.” Millsaps is in the crawling 
stage in regard to football, but will 
emerge from this state and do her fair 
name justice. But Coach cannot do it 
by himself, nor by the eleven men; 
but it will be done by every man and 
woman in Millsaps College doing his 
or her best to keep up the school 
spirit, and fostering the sentiment the 
Coach expressed in his talk in Chapel 



Monday morning. Let’e go, Millsaps, 
men are exceptionally fast and seem and back the Coach to the limit 

to be good back field or end material. 

although it is too early in the game to 
prophesy yet who will make these po- 
sitions. 

We cannot say now what sort of 
team we shall put out this year, but 
from the way Coach Freeland has tak- 
en hold of the situation here, we are 
sure to get as good coaching as any 
other school in this section. 



New Students! 

Learn These Yells 

Rap, Rap, Rap, Tap, Tap; 

Rap, Rap, Rap, Tap, Tap; 

Millsaps, Millsaps, Rap, Tap, Tap; 
Boom-la Mill, Boom-la Saps; 
Boom-la, Boom-la, Play Millsaps. 



Rock-a Chick-a Boom, Rock-a Chick-a 
Boom, 

Rock-a Chick-a, Rock-a Chick-a, 
Boom, Boom, Boom; 

Wah-Who-Rah, Wah-Who-Rah, 
Millsaps, Millsaps, Rah, Rah, Rah. 



How 





Yah 


How 




Yap 


Who 





Yah 


Mill 






Sis 




Boom 


Millsaps 







Football Song 

(Tune of Laddies Who Fought and 
Won.) 

When the whistle blows and the game 
is on. 

And the Purple team has charged, 

When the lines are crashing, and the 
ends are smashing, 

And Millsaps yells — Rah, Rah; 

When the halfback goes around the 
end, 

And the fullback hits ’em low, 

Then the game will be a victory for 
the Majors, 

So Purple and White, Let”s go. 



The Glee Club of Princeton Univer- 
sity has been offered a three weeks’ 
engagement to tour the Canal Zone 
this June. The offer eomes from the 
Canal Zone Commission of the gov- 
ernment and all expenses of the club 
are to be paid for by that body. — Col- 
lege Topics. 



The men who live on the N. O. G. N. 
will be up on the train that will run 
next week. 



Ducky might have said; 
learning is the usual thing. 



A little 



GALLOWAY LITERARY 
SOCIETY 

There are many men out in the bus- 
iness life of our State and Nation who 
can look back and give the Galloway 
Literary Society no small part in their 
success. During the last year our two 
representatives won from Mississippi 
College in the Triangular Debate. We 
won from our sister society both the 
Freshman and Commencement De- 
bates, losing to her one, the Inter-so- 
ciety. 

Not forgetting but building upon the 
past, we hope to be more than con- 
querers not only for Galloway, but 
also for Millsaps. And in co-operation 
with our sister society, we hope to 
give to Millsaps the wearing of the 
laurels. We are glad to see so many 
old men back, and the initial class of 
freshmen which we received into our 
society last Friday night more than 
surpassed all our expectations. 

The spirit of Bishop Galloway and 
Major Millsaps was the spirit that 
knew only victory by achievement. 
Every student should play a part in 
the literary victories of Millsaps this 
year. So not only for his individual 
good but especially for the Purple and 
White do we urge every student to be- 
come a member of some literary so- 
ciety. We cordially invite you to 
make the Galloway your choice. 

A GALLOWAY 



THE LAMAR LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



When Millsaps College began its 
first session, the Lamar Literary So- 
ciety also inaugurated its existence 
and became one of the first organiza- 
tions on the campus. From that time 
the < society has continued to fill a 
need in the life of the students. It of- 
fers an opportunity for those who care 
to improve themselves in public speak- 
ing. By practice in debating, oratory, 
and parliamentary practice, the mem- 
bers prepare themselves to become 
men able to make themselves felt in 
the active affairs of life. 

Many Lamars have become famous 
after finishing the college course. 
There are prominent lawyers, preach- 
ers, business men, and others scat- 
tered all over Mississippi whose suc- 
cess is in part due to the early train- 
ing in the Lamar Hall. 

Last session found the Lamar Soci- 
ety engaged in its usual good work. 
In the inter-society debates,- held at 
certain periods of the year, it divided 
honors about equally with the Gallo- 
way Society. In the regular weekly 
meetings, the members enjoyed many 
pleasant and useful evenings. 

Now comes the time when it is be- 
lieved that the society will be of great- 
er usefulness than ever before. All 
students were required to pay the 
literary society fee upon matricula- 
tion this year. It is hoped that all 
of these students will take advantage 
of this fee by joining one society or 
the other. The Lamar Literary Soci- 
ety is ready to offer its help to those 
who come into its membership. The 
new students in the college are wel- 
come at its meetings as prospective 
members, and are urged to join it. 
The first meeting of the session will 
be held tonight in the Lamar Hall. 



President Watkins’ home, the Kappa 
Sigma house, and the Kappa Alpha 
house look much better than former- 
ly, now that they have been repaired 
and painted. The Doctor and these 
two organizations are to be compli- 
mented on the improvement. It helps 
the looks of the campus. 



» 



JACKSON STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

WHEN CLOTHES ARE DIRTY 
RING SEVEN THIRTY 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 
Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY^ 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING CHAPEL. 



The students of the college enjoyed 
a bit of variety Wednesday morning, 
when at chapel Dr. Sullivan rushed 
up the program and announced that 
there would be special music. Miss 
Catherine Tucker came to the rostrum 
and delighted her listeners with a 
sacred selection. Her sweet voice won 
at once many admirers. According to 
the Doctor’s announcement, there will 
be features such as this throughout 
the year. Dr. Sullivan also stated 
that if possible an orchestra would be 
organized right away, and requested 
that all musicians in the student body 
communicate with him at once. If 
this plan is successful, the chapel 
periods could be much enlivened by 
the orchestra’s music, as would be 
all public occasions at the college. 

When chapel was over, the boys 
were requested to remain after the 
girls had been dismissed. Prof. White 
and Coach Freeland talked a few min- 
utes on the football situation, putting 
the facts before the students very 
frankly. It was stated that there are 
some men holding out from practice 
who should be there. A large squad 
is hard at work, but it should be much 
larger. Coach Freeland wants every 
man who has. a chance to make the 
team to come out and stick. But he 
says he would rather that man would 
stay away than that he should come 
out half-heartedly, cut practice occa- 
sionally, or break training. 

Interesting announcements were 
made at chapel that morning about 
the new system of class cuts. Each 
student is now allowed one cut in 
each class each term. Above that 
amount, the student will be excused 
only for sickness. If he cuts for oth- 
er reasons, he must stand an examina- 
tion on the day’s work he missed. 



The campus seems much more as 
of yore, since Chancellor William Guy 
has returned after a year’s absence. 
Chancellor is an indispensable fixture 
at Millsaps College; and it is with 
great pleasure that we welcome him 
back. It is to be hoped that ere long 
the new students will be permitted to 
hear him demonstrate his oratorical 
powers. 



The president has taken new office 
quarters unto himself. The office 
formerly occupied by the secretary is 
now Dr. W’atkins’ private sanctorum, 
and has been greatly improved by new 
furnishings. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 



JOKES 



Ho: Why, X went to college, “Fool- 

ish.” 

Bo: Yes, and you came back fool- 

ish, too. 



Son: There is a man in the hall to 

see you. 

Papa: Has he a bill? 

Son: No, just a regular nose. 



Fesh (Observing his first light 
globe) : What do they put glass around 
the light for? 

St>ph: To keep the light from going 

out at night. 



Soph (Giving catalogue exam) : 
What is steam? 

Fresh: Water crazy with the heat. 



Prof: Where is Pittsburgh? 

Stude: They are playing in Chicago 
today. 



If a man who left a suit case con- 
taining two pints of gin in our office 
will call by we will gladly give him an 
account of its disposal. 



Freshman Plumber: The doctor 

gave me two cartridges full of powder 
and told me not to smoke, as if I 
would. 



Mr. Moore would like to know 
whether “phenomena” spells “new 
monier” or “fee nomenar.” 



The spaghetti we had last week 
was cooked too long. Two inches 
would have been about right. 



The man who would let Coach see 
him smoking hasn’t enough sense to 
play football. 



¥**¥¥*¥*** 

* Found in the Mail * 

* Box * 

****¥*¥¥¥* 

Dear Sis: 

I will do as I promised and tell you 
all about my start in college, and do 
the best I can in telling you how 
the swell city co-eds dress. When 1 
first got to the dormitory a crowd 
yelled “Hello freshman” and I couldn’t 
imagine how they knew I was, be- 
cause I am as big and as old as most 
sophomores. Later on I found that a 
freshman is a freshman, and isn’t 
anything else until he ceases to be a 
freshman. But on the whole the old 
fellows let us off easier than was to 
be expected and I won’t have a single 
scar on me to show off as a martyr 
to get an education. 

I don’t seem to be nearly so big a 
man as I was at the high school at 
Lizard Hope, but it is partly because 
I am staying back in the shade and 
using my eyes more than my mouth. 
And I am learning a lot of things, 
some of them just what I have al- 
ways been taught wasn’t so. For in- 
stance, Paw and old Prof. Duzenberry 
and the preacher have all been saying 
that clothes don’t make the man. 
.That may be so there at home but 
at Millsaps it don’t hurt anybody to 
wear good clothes. I’m going to get 
a new suit so that when I go to meet 
a strange professor he’ll not say: 
“Delighted to meet you, Mr. Greene. 
So you wish to enroll for freshman 
Bible?” It’s going to be a little tight- 
er here and not quite so tight there 
and have pants legs that reach some 
closer to the ground. I noticed a 
great difference between the way the 
boys dress and the way the co-eds do; 



\ \ \ / / 




How Do Hot Things Cool? 



HE blacksmith draws a white-hot bar from the 
forge. It begins at once to cool. How does it lose 
its heat? Some is radiated, as heat is radiated by 
the sun; but some is carried away by the surrounding air. 
Now suppose the bar to be only one-half the diameter; 
in that case it loses heat only half as fast. Smaller bars lose 
in proportion. It would seem that this proportion should 
hold, however much the scale is reduced. But does it? 
Does a fine glowing wire lose heat in proportion to its 
diminished size? 



The Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company began a purely scientific investigation to 
ascertain just how fast a glowing wire loses heat. It was 
found that for small bodies the old simple law did not 
hold at all. A hot wire .010 in. diameter dissipates heat 
only about 12 per cent more rapidly than a wire .005 in. 
diameter instead of twice as fast as might be expected. 

The new fact does not appear very important, yet it 
helped bring about a revolution in lighting. 

It had been found that a heated filament in a vacuum 
evaporated like water and that this evaporation could be 
retarded by introducing an inert gas such as nitrogen or 
argon. But it had long been known that the presence of 
gas in the ordinary incandescent lamp caused so much 
heat to be carried from the filament that the lamp was 
made useless. The new understanding of the laws of heat 
from wires, however, pointed out a way of avoiding the 
supposed necessity of a vacuum. 



By forming the fine tungsten filament into a helix the 
heat loss was made much less prominent. The fight 
radiated is then about the same as if the wire were 
stretched out, but the heat loss through the gas is very 
.much less. So the tightly coiled filament was put into the 
gas-filled bulb — and a new lamp was created. At the 
same cost it gave more and better light. , 

Thus pure research, conducted primarily to find out 
how hot things cool, led to the invention of the gas-filled 
lamp of today — the cheapest, most efficient illuminant 
thus far produced. 



Sooner or later research in pure science enriches the 
world with discoveries that can be practically applied. 
For this reason the Research Laboratories devote much 
time to the study of purely scientific problems. 



Gem© r a!®EI ©ctric 



General Office 



Company 



Schenectady, N. Y.* 

95-360D 



a boy, even if he has silk socks lets 
his pants come down and cover them 
up, but the girls don’t wear anything 
low but their collars. 

But to get to the most interesting 



Sis, do you remember the time you 
tried to make yourself a red dress 
and it looked like a gunny sack draped 
around you? Well, they have some 
here just like that and they are the 



part of this place, there are about a 



latest thing out. They are too little 



hundred of them and they nearly all 
have bobbed hair. Some of them are 
blondes and some brunets but I didn’t 
see any red headed ones. I asked a 
soph why that was and he said that 
last year they tried red headed girls 
and that it was thought best to abolish ) 
them. Anyhow, there are enough red | 
headed boys to enlighten the whole 
school. These co-eds are some pun- 
kins for looks but they have just sense 
enough to come in out of the rain 
when they are wearing clothes that 
will melt. And the clothes they do j 
wear! Bright red and bright green 
are in a close race but I think red | 
will win because it is brighter, i j 
can't tell you how they are made 
except that it is funny looking. Say. 



in some places and at the bottom they 
flare out like the horn of our old Vic- 
trola, but just the same I heard all 
the bob-headed girls bragging on the 
ones that had them. Well I’ll have to 
tell you about that good lookingest 
girl next time. 

Your brother, 

LEAF GREENE. 



A number of the co-eds of last year 
are entering other colleges this fall. 
Misses Bertha Hines, Annie Virden, 
Normastel Peatross, and Alice Bris- 
coe left Monday night for Randolph- 
Macon College at Lynchburg, Va. 
These young ladies were very popu- 
lar here and will be greatly missed. 



Dewitt Mullins, formerly of the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, is a student of 
Millsaps College. 



Austin Joyner, a student here in 
1919-20, has returned for further 
studies this year. 



TENNIS POPULAR WITH STU- 
DENTS. 



The tennis courts are in use every 
afternoon, and the students seem to 
be taking a great interest in this sport. 
The recent hot spell that has been so 
unpleasant to the football squad is 
quite in line with the desires of the 
swatters of the lively pill. They seem 
to feel that the summer sun is holding 
over especially for their benefit, and 
so they offer their thanks by taking 
full advantage of his gift. The new 
men seem to be less interested in ten- 
nis than the old; but perhaps they 
feel some timidity in approaching such 
tried veterans of the oblong court. 




8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



SEPTEMBER, 23-24 



BETTY COMPSON in “PRISONERS OF LOVE” 



By CATHERINE HENRY 

A STIRRING DRAMA OF PASSIONATE YOUTH A GOLDWYN SUPER SPECIAL 

Clyde Cook in THE MAJESTIC • MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA 



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LOCALS 

Millsaps has a larger number of co- 
eds this year than ever before in its 
history. Besides the new students 
who come from Jackson there are sev- 
eral out-of-town girls. They are 
Misses Catherine Barbour, Yazoo City; 
Mildred Brashear, Vicksburg; Gladys 
Curtis, Greenwood; Evelyn Flowers, 
Birmingham; Elise Davis, Laurel; 
Laura Lee Hollingsworth, Isola; May 
Davenport, Forest; Ann Stevens, 
Brandon; and Catherine Tucker, Gren- 
ada. 



Miss Mildred Brashear, a transfer 
from the University of Chattanooga, 
has registered in the Junior Class. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

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Misses Clara Wright and Catherine 
Barbour, sophomores from Newcomb 
College, have entered Millsaps as 
special students. 



Miss Elise Davis, known already to 
her acquaintances as “Jack” Davis, 
comes to Millsaps from Newcomb to 
enter the Sophomore Class. Miss Ann 
Stevens, also from Newcomb, has 
registered as a junior. 



Coach Bales, our athletic director 
of last session and the year before, 
has taken charge of athletics in the 
city schools of Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
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This space reserved for 
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Mist Elizabeth Morrison, a popular 
student at Newcomb last year, is reg- 
istered at Millsaps. 



The latest figures on enrollment 
this year show that the total number 
of students in the college is 258. Of 
these 79 are girls, who form a larger 
part of the student body than ever be- 
fore. The sophomore English class 
breaks all records with a membership 
of 65 or 70, while the sophomore chem- 
istry class is even larger. 



Chas. Wharton and W. A. Scott, stu- 
dents here last session, have gone to 
Vanderbilt this year. 



Miss Katherine Howie is now a stu 
dent at Agnes-Scott College. 



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Miss Harriet Herring has entered 
Whitworth College to take up ad- 
vanced work in music. 



Miss Joy King is to study this ses- 
sion at Blue Mountain College. 



P. E. Smith, W. D. Tynes, L. C. Cor- 
ban, and Joe Howorth have matriculat- 
ed at “Ole Miss,” where they will con- 
tinue the work begun here. 



H. H. Mellard is a student at Cen- 
tenary College. 



E. B. Boatner has entered the Uni- 
versity of Illinois to study civil en- 
gineering. 



James Sells, who was a leading stu- 
dent at Millsaps during the session of 
1919-20, has come back to finish his 
course. Since his last sojourn here as 
a student, Jim has married, but he 
will no doubt find more time for stu- 
dent activities now than the great 
majority of our men. We are uncom- 
monly glad to welcome him. 



GODLESS MEN 

A big, powerful story of the sea, seething with ad- 
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by the law of might. 

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September 21st and 22nd 

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QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY. SEPT. 30, 1921 N^2 



BLUE RIDGE DELE- LAMAR LITERARY WHAT LAST YEAR’S P & W WARIORS PRE- 
GATES MAKE REPORT SOC. BEGINS WORK GRADUATES ARE DOING PARE FOR PREPS 



Watson, Lotterhos, and Col- 
lins Represent Mill- 
saps “Y” 



Officers For First Term are Sixteen out of Twenty-four 
Elected — New Men are Teaching — Three go 

Initiated to School Again 



At Blue Ridge, North Carolina, in 
the “Land of the Sky”, there is held 
an annual convention under the aus- 
pices of the national Young Men’s 
Christian Association. Here the dele- 
gates from the Y. M. C. A’s of every 
southern college and university meet 
and for two weeks lead a life of pure 
enjoyment and at the same time re- 
ceive inspiration that has a lasting 
effect. Every summer for many years 
hundreds of students have been going 
to Blue Ridge and have gone back to 
their colleges inspired by the vision 
they have received. They have seen 
the workings of the great organization 
which they represent; they have 
grasped the tremendous scope of the 
work that the Y. M. C. A. is carrying 
on in all parts of the world. They 
have met the men who are leaders in 
this movement and whose names are 
known all over the land. They have 
caught the spirit of these men and 
have been fired with the determination 
to carry on this great work. It is no 
wonder^ then, that Blue Ridge is al- 
ways remembered by those who have 
gone, not only for its inspirational 
value but for the healthful recreations, 
beautiful «cenery and the spirit of 
comradeship between the students of 
the different colleges. 

Millsaps has al’vavs recognized the 
value of Blue Ridge and has for many 
years been well represented there. 
I ast year, however, funds were none 
too plentiful and the Y. M. C. A. was 
able to send only three men. These 
wore Jesse F. Watson, President of 
the Millsaps “Y”, Fred J. Lotterhos. 
and Henry B. Collins. John Harris, 
representing the city association, was 
also there. These four left Jackson 
on Sunday, June 11th and reached 
Black Mountain the following Tuesday. 
Now let these delegates finish the 
story. 

We piled our baggage into a wait- 
ing taxi and were soon climbing the 
hills toward Blue Ridge. We could 
see it now, three miles away and lame 
hundreds of feet above us. nestling 
"non the side of a mountain; the clear 
whiteness of Robert E. Lee Hall and 
the other buildings standing out dis- 
tinctly against the green clad moun- 
tain that stretched below and towered 
far above it. We were among the 
*irst to arrive and so avoided the rush 
that followed that afternoon and the 
next day. We were given quarters 
in the Auburn cottage and had every- 
thing that could be desired in the way 
of comfort and conveniences. - 
* From the front of Robert E. Lee 
Hall, the main dormitory and admin- 
istration building, there was a beauti- 
ful view of the Blue Ridge and Black 
Mountain ranges. Here at any time 
could be seen groups of boys gazing 
in awe at the cloud-capped mountains. 
Accustomed as we were td the flat 
(Continued on Page 2) 



The Lamar Literary Society held its 
initial meeting Friday night last at 
Lamar Hall 

The program though an impromptu 
one was snappy throughout and was 
thoroughly enjoyed by all present. 

The meeting was called to order 
by President (pro-tem) Swearingen 
and was opened by a prayer by Chap- 
lain Watson, who asked the guidance 
and blessing of the Lord on all under- 
takings attempted by the society dur- 
ing the school year. 

From the roll call, it was noted that 
twenty-eight old members were again 
to be enrolled. This unusual showing 
is significant of the fact that a ma- 
jority of Lamars are true Millsaps men 
and stick with the school and the so- 
ciety to the bitter end — that end be- 
ing the securing of a diploma. 

Then came the election of new mem- 
bers and among those admitted to the 
secrets and privileges of Lamarism 
were: J. E. Tumlin, C. H. Gunn, O. L. 
Ellis, J. O. Harris. J. W. Young, N. C. 
Young. J. W. Flowers, and T. W. Swin- 
son. Each of the new members ex- 
pressed his appreciation of the honor 
bestowed upon him, assured the so- 
ciety of his co-operation, and acknowl- 
edged his responsibility — that of mak- 
ing Lamar a success and a power in 
school life. Short talks were made by 
Shearer, Watson, and others on the 
necessity of quick organization in or- 
der to set to work immediately. 

Election of officers for the ensuing 
three months quickly followed and 
(Continued on Page 3) 

SEVEN STUDENT IN- 
STRUCTORS THIS YEAR 



The Large Freshman Class 
Causes Increase 

Owing to the record attendance at 
Millsaps this year, the faculty seemed 
in danger of being swamped with 
work. The extreme size of the fresh- 
man and sophomore classes made it 
necessary that they be divided into 
sections, and supported tl|e claim that 
we are a growing college. There is 
great need for two oi; three more pro- 
fessors in departments already in ex- 
istence. and it is Very likely that they 
will soon be had. The immediate ques- 
tion. however, of taking, care of this 
year’s attendance, is bemg solved by 
the use bf more student instructors. 

In the English department, F. J. Lot- 
terhos, who last year held the assist- 
antship in that branch of the college, 
is to teach one section of freshman 
English. He will be assisted in the 
grading of theme papers by H. B. Col- 
lins. 

Dr. Key, in the department of An- 
cient Languages, will be relieved of 
the Cicero class by Mack Swearingen, 
while a class in Caesar will be taught 
by J. B. Shearer. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Mattee Bullard married W. E. Buf- 
kin in August and they are now mak- 
ing their home at Pontotoc where Mr. 
Bufkin, a graduate of ’20, is superin- 
tendent of schools. 

Annie Crisler is teaching English 
in the junior high school of Jackson 

Willie Spann is teaching mathemat- 
ics at the junior high school of Jack- 
son. 

Lurline Patton is teaching chemistry 
at Whitworth College. 

C. W. Alford is principal of the con- 
solidated high school at Anding. 

W. L. Day is teaching at Liberty 
this year. 

L. B. Hebert is teaching French and 
Spanish at Centenary Academy, at 
Shreveport, La. 

A. L. Shipman is teaching Latin and 
mathematics in the Cleveland High 
School. 

R. F. (Bobbie) Harrell is assistant 
principal of the high school at Inde- 
pendence, La. 

E. M. Ervin is employed by a whole- 
sale grocery firm at Columbus. 

L. B. Roberts, M. A., is assistant 
in the department of physics in the 
Texas A. & M. 

L. J. Calhoun is teaching at Meri- 
gold. , 

M. M. Black is teaching in a junior 
college in West Virginia. . 

E. A. King is pastor of the Benton 
charge. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



GALLOWAY SOCIETY 

HOLDS MEETING 



Chancellor William Guy 
Presents Famous 
Oration 



The Galloway Literary Society met 
in regular session last Friday night. 
The meeting was called to Order by 
the president, J. W- Sells, and the 
minutes of the' last meeting were read 
by the secretary. W. P. Poole. 

Eleven new merf' joined the Society 
that night and nineteen at the first 
meeting, bringing the total of new 
members up to thirty. 

The program for the evening was 
then read. All of the men carried out 
their parts well, and in the debate M. 
L. McCormick and Mark McCall 
preached very fine sermons in defend- 
ing their respective sides of the sub- 
ject. 

Chancellor William Guy was then 
called on to deliver his famous ora- 
tion “The Next Victory of the Blue- 
Eved Race”. All of the old students 
knew what was in store for them when 
Chancellor’s name was announced, and 
the new students soon found out that 
they were listening to the greatest 
orator on Millsaps campus. 

Mrs. C. L. McCormick was elected 
an honorary member of the society. 



Locals Open Season Satur- 
day With Academy 
Team 

Coach Freeland's huskies have been 
preparing themselves this past week 
for the first contest of the season, 
when they tackle the strong Acade- 
my team. In spite of the extreme 
hot weather, Coach Freeland has heen 
putting his men through fast practice 
during the entire week. There has 
been a wonderful improvement in the 
pass work of the team, and from the 
present outlook we shall have a team 
i that will have to be watched until the 
final whistle blows. The squad has 
been strengthened considerably by a 
number of new men who are show- 
ing up fairly well for this early in 
the season. Coombs, who is out for 
quarterback, has a good record and 
will make a strong fight for that po- 
sition. Davenport seems to be good 
material for a half or tackle. It will 
be a hard matter to tell who the coach 
will use in the game against the preps 
but we prophesy that every worthy 
man will be given a chance to show 
what is in him. 

The Academy has an exceptionally 
strong team this year and are ex- 
pected to put up a strong fight against 
■ the college eleven. 

Last years’ college team has not for- 
gotten that game in which the Preps 
held the college to a tie— 0-0. With 
“Chick” Nelson and Reynolds in the 
backfield, the Academy will have two 
men that are as good as any two men 
on the college team. These men are* 
expected to star for the Prep eleven. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



PRESIDING ELDERS 
WANT CHURCH 

AT MILLSAPS 



In a recent meeting held in Jack- 
son. the presiding elders of Missis- 
sippi decided that there should be a 
Method is t church on the Millsaps eam- 
puST? This edifice, the conferees 
thought, should cost about $75, 000.00. 
Accordingly they drew up and adopted 
the following resolutions: 

“Whereas the spiritual interest of 
Millsaps College demands a more in- 
tensive religious life, and 

“Whereas, the church facilities are 
inadequate, on account of the distance 
of the churches of the city from the 
college campus; therefore be it 

Resolved by the presiding elders of 
the Mississippi and North Mississippi 
conference, here assembled, that we- 
memorialize our two annual confer- 
ences respectively, to take steps as 
soon as practical to erect on or near - 
the campus of Millsaps College a mod- 
ern church building with all neces- 
sary equipment required to accommo- 
date the religious and social activi- 
ties of the church.” 

Of course, such an undertaking, as 
the resolution sets forth, must come 
before the conferences of Mississippi, 
where the plan will probably be quick- 
ly quashed. 





2 



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Blue Ridge Delegates Make 
Reports 

(Continued from Page 1) 
topography of Mississippi, this sight 
was enough to claim our attention, and 
here we would stand, looking on this 
wonder-land of nature and wonder- 
ing if we could ever he content again 
within the comparitively drab confines 
of our native state. 

Classes started on Wednesday, and 
here was another enjoyable surprise. 
Little or no outside study was re- 
quired, the lecture system being used 
almost exclusively. Most of the in- 
structors were university professors, 
men of more than local fame, whose 
hearts were tied up in the cause of 
christianizing education. There were 
classes for studying industrial condi- 
means were discussed of bringing the 
teachings of the Bible actively into 
the life of the college; classes for 
students who intended to be engineers, 
doctors, preachers and teachers, and 
classes that studied industrial condi- 
tions. Much stress was laid upon this 
feature. The Y. M. C. A. recognizes 
that industrial unrest is one of the 
problem that must be settled if the 
country is to advance in prosperity, 
and they are turning their efforts to- 
ward this and are accomplishing much 
good. Besides the class room work 
we had the opportunity of listening 
to lectures every day by such men as 
Sherwood Eddy, Robert E. Speer, and 
others of national reputation. 

The afternoons were given over to 
sports, mountain climbing, or relaxa- 
tion. The members of the Millsaps 
delegation put in most of their spare 
time in hiking over the mountains, en- 
joying the scenery and browsing on 
the wild strawberries that abounded 
there. On one trip Collins ran into 
a hornet nest and in his precipitous 
descent almost started an avalanche 
down the mountain side. Lotterhos 
proved himself to be the best moun- 
taineer of the bunch as he was the 
only one to join the small group that 
journeyed to the top of Mt. Mitchell, 
twenty-five miles away and up. Ten- 
nis and swimming were the most pop- 
ular sports, but those who wished 
could play basket-ball or baseball. In 
the intercollegiate aquatics meet Mill- 
saps was represented by John Har- 
ris, who is quite a shark in the water. 
His form divine brought forth gasps 
of admiration and envy from all who 
saw him. We must not overlook the 
eats, which was one of the outstand- 
nig features of Blue Ridge. We could 
tell how President Watson brazenly 
flirted with our waitress, who was a 
Mississippi girl, but we won’t do it. 

The two weeks passed before we 
realized it. The atmosphere of the 
place, the spirit of comradeship and 
mutual helpfulness, and the inspira- 
tion there received will make the trip 
to Blue Ridge an event to be remem- 
bered in the lives of each student who 
was there. 



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GLEE CLUB PREPARES 
FOR OPERA SEASON 

The glee club met on Monday night 
for the first time this session. A 
large number of men came out to the 
meeting, which was held in the chapel; 
but comparatively few of the old mem- 
bers of the organization were present. 
Of course, little more was done at this 
meeting than to find out just who was 
trying for each place. Dr. Mitchell, 
the leader of the club for several years 
past, was in charge. Prof. Hamilton 
and his able leadership in singing 
were greatly missed, for until this year 
he has been an active factor in the or- 
ganization. 



OLD STUDENT RE- 
CALLS FORMER DAYS 






As the seasons come and go, just so 
Millsaps changes. The Millsaps of the 
days gone by, say in 1916, was a dif- 
ferent school from now. She seeming- 
ly should have grown older — and so 
she has in such matters as experience 
and days — hut in age of her students 
there is a striking difference. 

There were no jelly-beans or flap- 
pers then. The men that came to 
this college came for business and not 
so much for fun. True, there were 
a few of that type, but not so many. 
And then there were only a few young 
ladies— enough to make life interest- 
ing, but not enough to be very dis- 
tracting. The trend of the times now 
seems to be to make all co-eds bob 
their hair and to make all men part 
their hair in the middle. Parting hair 
and bobbing hair is all right, if one 
can keep his equilibrium; strange to 
say though it makes new and strange 
people. 

The greatest change that has come 
to this school is the passing of the 
good old Alpha Pi Sigma fraternity. 
With its passing came into the life 
of the college married students and 
their families. The old time “shacks” 
have changed into “married folk row”. 
The A. P. S. at one time controlled 
the politics of the college, and the 
strongest men came from that crowd; 
but now the other fraternities have 
absorbed the men that would have 
gone there and the old order changeth. 

One very good and pleasing phase 
of college life has also departed. 
One may hope that it is dead and 
gone. That was the “politicing” that 
came off. It was not friendly rivalry 
that held sway; it was almost Varda- 
man and Bilbo stuff. Frat sided with 
sorority against other frats; outsiders, 
against all the rest. This all led to 
antagonism and party bickering. It 
has gone and we hope that it will 
never return. 

So it goes on. One year will bring 
in an exceptionally young bunch that 
will try to sway society their way. 
They will have their life in the col- 
lege; then others will hold sway and 
rule. Millsaps should at all times 
grow consistently better. If it does 
not do that it is the fault of the rul- 
ing class. This year it apparently will 
prosper. 



“RED” WILLIAMS 
FORMER MILLSAPS 
ATHLETE AT VANDY 



One of the former athletic heroes 
of Millsaps College is now trying for 
the football team at Vanderbilt. Red 
Williams, star base ball and basket- 
ball performer here in years just past, 
has gained favorable mention by one 
of the Nashville dailies in a recent 
issue. Here is what the paper says; 

“Williams, the 190-pound lad from 
Hernando, Miss., proved the sensation 
of the afternoon. At the position of 
fullback, he was the source of consid- 
erable favorable comment among Com- 
modore supporters. The Mississippi 
lad is fast, stands six feet and six 
inches and hits the linn hard. Yes- 
terday he tore off several fifteen yard 
runs through the opposing forwards.” 

Though Wiliams is known to but few 
of the present students of Millsaps, 
most of them have heard of his record 
here. It is a source of pleasure to hear 
of his progress, though it would sound 
much better if he were working out 
with the purple squad on the Millsaps 
field. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



Lamar Literary Society 
Begins Work 

(Continued from Page 1) 



those honored were: 

W. E. Stokes, President; M. B. 
Swearingen, Vice-President; H. C. 
Young, Secretary; J. B. Abney, Treas- 
urer; H. H. Knoblock, Corresponding 
Secretary; F. J. Lotterhos, Critic; J. 
E. Tumlin, Censor; J. R. Hillman, Ser- 
geant-at- Arms ; Peter Clark, Chaplain. 

Each new officer acknowledged the 
honor tendered him by a short speech, 
the most impressive of which was that 
made by the treasurer. The duties and 
responsibilities resting upon each 
member’s shoulders were concisely set 
forth by Mr. Abney, who concluded by 
summarizing his talk in the now fa- 
miliar admonition, ‘Tf you’re going 
to be a Lamar, he a Lamar.” 

The President appointed each mem- 
ber on a committee consisting of him- 
self to carry out the drive for mem- 
bership. Each one is to come regu- 
larly and ’bring another with him. The 
word "bring” is to mean “rn by and 
get”and not just tell someone about 
the Lamars. 

The business at hand being conclud- 
ed, a question for impromptu debate 
was assigned. “Resolved that Dr. Wat- 
kins is longer-winded than Dr. Sulli- 
van”, was affirmatively upheld by 
Shearer and Young, while the negative 
side was defended by Tumlin and 
Joyner. 

The affirmative brought out the 
points that Dr. Watkins was widely 
known as a speaker who could talk in- 
definitely; that his moustache aided 
him materially in prolonging an ad- 
dress, because when he was trying to 
think of something to say, by wiggling 
it, he could cause the attention of the 
audience to be attracted to the mous- 
tache and they would not become bor- 
ed waiting for him to continue his re- 
marks. His wide experience and the 
fact that he retired majectically and 
without apparent fatigue from the ros- 
trum, stunt night, while “Groot” was 
gasping for breath, were also cited. 

The negative declared that there 
was no room for doubt that Dr. Sul- 
livan was the longer winded of the 
two. The fact was conclusively prov- 
ed stunt night when “Sully” spoke 
longer and louder than any other mem- 
ber of the faculty. The negative cinch- 
ed the argument when they introduc- 
ed the point that Dr. Watkins smoked 
a pipe and Dr. Sullivan, by chemistry, 
could prove that smoking ruined the 
lungs and shortened the wind. The 
debate was decided negatively by an 
almost unanimous vote. 

Because of the wide spread interest 
caused by the new ruling as to cuts, 
the question for next Friday night’s 
debate is “Resolved that the new cut 
svstem should be abolished and the 
o'd svstem reinstated.” The defense 
for both sides shows promise of be- 
ing spirited. 



The latest figures on enrollment 
show 274 as the number of students 
in Millsaps College. This is more than 
at any time last year. A larger num- 
ber than usual of. the new students 
are transfers from other colleges. 
Practically every school in this 'section 
■of the South is represented, and there 
are several students who have come 
from distant schools. 



Some like girls with golden curls, 
And some with hair dark brown; 
I like girls with bobbed hair and 
dresses, 

To put my arm aroun’. 



PREPS READY FOR 
SATURDAY’S CONTEST 



Under the leadership of Coach Hunt- 
ley, the Academy football squad has 
been training hard for what they con- 
sider their hardest game of the sea- 
son, the game with the College which 
is scheduled for Saturday, October 1. 
'The Preps are in good shape and are 
confident of victory. 

The team has been greatly strength- 
ened by the addition of D. D. Stanton, 
of Meridian. Stanton played several 
years with Meridian College. He is a 
substantial addition to the line. His 
position is tackle. Several other mem- 
bers of the team have had much ex- 
perience with other prep schools and 
academys in various states. In fact, 
there are only two or three men on 
the team who have not had one or 
more year's experience. Another prom- 
ising feature of the team is its excep- 
tionally high average of weight, which 
is approximately one hundred and six- 
ty-five pounds. 



Seven Student Instuctors 
This Year 

(Continued from Page 1) 

In the absence of Professor Hamil- 
ton at the University of Pennsylvania, 
plans have been made for the instruc- 
tion of only two classes in German. 
B. C. Boyd will teach the German I 
class, and Thomas Coursey, who has 
been studying German under Profes- 
sor Hamilton since first entering Mill- 
| saps, will have the beginning class, 
German A. 

Austin Joyner, an old Millsaps boy, 
i who is back this year, will assist Dr. 

! Mitchell in the mathematics depart- 
! ment and also take the place left va- 
cant by “Pope” Roberts in the chem- 
istry laboratory. 

These men, all of whom have proved 
their ability in the classroom and on 
the campus, may he expected to give 
good service in their responsible po- 
sitions. Their work, which is for Mill- 
! saps will at the same time be valuable 
\ to them ; and if they profit by the op- 
j portunity for some practical experi- 
j ence, they will learn while teaching. 



Y. W. C A. GIVES AD- 
VICE TO NEW GIRLS 


















“Pep” is the watchword and motto 
of the Y. W. C. A. If you don’t be- 
lieve it you should have been at our 
first meeting, which was held Thurs- 
day last week, at one o’clock. The 
devotional exercises were conducted 
by the president, after which she ex- 
plained the conditions of membership. 
The program had been arranged with 
the idea of giving the girls an insight 
into college life as well as the activ- 
ities of the Y. W. C. A. 

Grace McMullan told of the Tucker 
Medal which is open to girls who are 
candidates for an A. B. degree. Isabel 
Johnston made a short talk about bas- 
ket ball as an activity for the girls and 
urged them to show their interest by 
coming out for practice. Lucile Nail 
chairman of the house committee, read 
and explained the rules concerning the 
Hut. Then the girls who went to Mon- 
treat gave interesting accounts of their 
trip and proposed that we send an 
even larger delegation next year. Be- 
fore the meeting adjourned light re- 
freshments were served. 



So Convenient. 

Sign in Dayton, Ohio — “Ladies: 
j Save your back and rugs — let us clean 
! them for you.” 



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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription . 

Additional Subscription 

Apply to Business Manager tor Advertising 


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Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Saturday. 


STAFF 


























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REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Raj-, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer. 


MANAGEMENT 








Assistant Business Manager - _ 






a FT 





THE NEW “CUT” SYSTEM 

The recent action of our faculty in promulgating new rules in 
regard to cutting classes has aroused much criticism, chiefly hostile, 
on the part of the students. Some of this criticism has been in a 1 
spirit of jest and some in a spirit of earnest protest. And yet, al- 
most anyone is ready to admit that the old system was faulty, al- 
though it made things easy for the student. The protest comes be- 
cause the new plan is too harsh, and not because the old one is 
considered a fixed right. 

Naturally, the students liked the plan which allowed ten per 
cent cuts in every class, and naturally, many took advantage of this 
permission without suitable excuse. We think the old plan needed 
to be revised. 

The new idea of permitting only one absence without inquiry j 
in each class each term is a great improvement. But the additional 
rules in regard to excuses and extra examinations is burdensome in 
part. There are many legitimate excuses for absence besides sick- 
ness, and these should be recognized when presented to a faculty 
committee so as to satisfy them. Then, also, when a man’s absences 
have been excused, he should not be required to stand an extra ex- 
amination, which probably does not include any of the work for the 
days he missed. His regular examination grade should be applied | 
for the classes which were legitimately cut. 

Only in the case where a man’s cutting is wanton and without 
excuse should the extra examination, with its maximum grade of 
70 and its fee, be required. The fee might be left out even then. 



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We feel that all this will be worked out by the faculty soon, 
and that the new system will not be allowed to place an undeserved 
burden on any person. Any new plan has to be tried and then 
changed to suit conditions. The cut system will no doubt be ar- 
ranged satisfactorily, and when so changed will be much better than 
formerly in that it will raise the standard for work in the college. 



Correct Clothes 
for College Men 

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PURPLE JERSEYS AND FIGHT 



STORE FOR MEN 



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You wearers of the purple jersey, there is one thing that it 
takes to win glory. That is “fight”. Fight through every prac- 
tice, putting your best into it. Fight, then, in every splic second 
of every game. 

We know that you will fight and that you are fighting. That 
you may be sure that you are not in the struggle aloue, we tell you 
that every man and woman on the campus is squarely back of you 
to the finish. 

The school has confidence in you men who are working for the 
team and it has faith in the coach who is working with you. 

Success is within our grasp and we must reach out for it. The 
second season of football is here, and we must leave an ever-broaden- 
ing trail as our record. 

Every day’s practice makes the prospects for this year’s vic- 
tories brighter. All we need is to keep fighting. 

Remember we are going to show what we can do this year. It ’s 
going to be every ounce in the game through the last minute of play. 

Fight. 



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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 




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Academy Prayer Meeting 

A most helpful feature of the Aca- 
demy life is the evening prayer meet- 
ing which is conducted in the study 
hall each evening before the study 
period. The prayer meeting was be- 
gun last year, and was considered so 
helpful to the students that the old 
men determined to reorganize the 
meeting again this year. At the ficst 
meeting, V. E. Chalfant was selected 
to conduct the services for the current 
term. Prof. Ferguson and Mr. McCall 
from the college made interesting talks 
to the students. 



SEASHORE CLUB 

TO REORGANIZE 



The Seashore Club, which is made 
up of the former students of the Sea- 
shore Campground School of Biloxi, 
Miss., will have a meeting in the near 
future to reorganize. There is a large 
number of new men on the campus 
who will be asked to join. 

Some of the old members to return 
this year are: W, E. Campbell, C. L. 
McCormick, M. L. McCormick, T. H. 
King, F. W. McEwen, J. W. Moore, 
and R. H. Moore. The new men 
on the campus from Seashore are: 
Cotton Cambell, J. F. Hudson, Aus- 
tin Joyner, F. L. Martin, H. B. 
Sharborough, E. L. Traylor, and J.' 
E. Skinner. We grieve with the stu- 
dent body that two of our members, 
Peevy and Rouse, are not back this 
year. | f|' 



OOOCOOOOCOOOOOOOOOC)OOOOCOO 

OPEN FORUM 

OOCOOOOOOOOOOODOOOOOOOCOOO 

Ramblings From a Radical 

A freshman was wandering down 
the walk one day from classes and he 
had some very strange experiences — 
some that would have caused him to 
wonder what kind of a small animal 
he was, some that would have made 
his heart glad if he had been bright 
enough to wonder. But being a fresh- 
fnan, he took it for granted that it 
was as it should be. 

Strolling down the walk he came 
upon a bunch of jelly-beans by the side 
of the cars parked there. They look- 
ed as if they had stepped from a fash- 
ion plate. He wanted to speak to 
them, for some of them were among 
his idols, but they shunned him and 
caused him to sorrow. This hurt him, 
for he supposed college idols were gen- 
tlemen. 

Passing on, he came upon a group of 
what he thought were fellows that did 
not count in college; they greeted him 
with a smile and engaged him in a 
small conversation. This cheered him 
a little and he felt as if life might be 
worth living, after all. 

After this, unknown to him, old man 
| Nemesis approached. Walking on 
down past the library and science hall 
he started over to the book store. 
Gathered around in front was a bevy 
of girls, talking as though they were 
working against time. One of them 
he had known before and he thought 
he might speak to her. He tipped his 
cap and nodded; she at first thought 
to look clear through him; then tilted 
her chin in that inimitable way girls 
have and passed him up. He, poor boy 
instead of going on and offering her 
some cream or cakes, as he had in- 
tended, w'ent to his room with tears 
in his eyes and a breaking heart. 
Such is the manner of snobs. 

Speaking of that detestable breed 
of human beings, are you “it”? We 
have a few on -the campus; would that 
they were extinct. If you are too 
good to speak to some one you pass on 
the w-alk, you are elected to the Grand 
Order of Snobs. If, just because you 
are being rushed by some frat or sor- 
ority, you think you do not have to 
be nice to one of your former friends, 
you are “it”. If, just because you are 
a co-ed and have had better chances 
than some of the girls and can dress 
better than they can, you refuse to 
be nice to them, then you are “it”. If, 
just because you can ride in a car and 
some poor person working his way 
through college has to walk, you re- 
fuse to speak to them, then you are 
“it”. 

It doesn’t cost much to speak to a 
person. 

Any person who enters Millsaps Col- 
lege and refuses to imbibe the spirit 
of the school, refuses to be a Millsaps 
man. The spirit of this college is to 
be kind, and friendly. If you can’t be 
this way, then you had better begin 
to change or you will be appointed 
janitor of the House of Snobs. 

A fraternity is to make people friend- 
ly and not to promote rivalry and jeal- 
ousy. The college can exist without 
the fraternity or you, but the fraterni- 
ty cannot exist without the college. 
So, if you belong to the “elected”, you 
had better be sure which bunch it is 
that you are elected to. 

—PLUTO. 




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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



Boyd, from S. P. U., has entered 
Millsaps College for work toward his 
degree this year. 



mine* 

1 FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE § 

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JACKSON, MISS. 1 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



KAPPA SIGMA SMOKER 

i 

Alpha Upsilon Chapter of the Kappa ^ 
Sigma Fraternity entertained its 
friends and alumni with a delightful 
smoker Wednesday evening, Septem- 
ber 25th. The gathering upon this oc- 
casion was similar to those held every 
year at this time, except this one sur- 
passed all others in arrangement of 
detail and attention to larger interests. 

Everything that could be had in the 
way of appetizing refreshments and 
good smokes was on tap. Enthusiasm 
and good spirits (non-Volstead) fur- 
nished a proper atmosphere for the 
renewing of former ties of friendship 
and the making of new ones. Exper- 
iences of the past summer and of for- 
mer years were related by the active 
members returned and the alumni 
present. E. K. Windham and Horace 
Villee had many interesting things to 
tell of the National Conclave of Kappa 
Sigma held in Chicago last July, Wind- 
ham being the representative of the 
Chapter here, while Villee represented 
the Shreveport (La.) Alumni Chapter. 

Professor C. A. Bowen and Profes- 
sor G. L. Harrell, members of the fac- 
ulty and former initiates of Kappa 
Sigma at Millsaps, were present and 
furnished many interesting details of 
the fraternity life at Millsaps some 
fifteen or twenty years ago. Ed Stiles 
and his band of music makers were 
present and entertained with the latest 
jazz music. 

Among those attending this smoker 
were many of the alumni from Jack- 
son, all the active men in the chapter, 
and the following from among the new 
students: W. F. Cook, M. A. Sanders, 

and Lloyd Cunningham, of Booneville; 
Walter Galloway, J. C. Galloway, Eu- 
gene Tate, and R. J. Williams, of Mc- 
Comb City; Frank Stuart, DeWitt Mul- 
lins, Cotton Campbell, W. B. Gowdey, 
Jr., Robert Lilly, and S. D. Morrison, 
of Jackson; M. P. Lumpkin, of Tupelo; 
John Simms, of Brandon; and J. J. 
Dillard, of Roundaway, Miss. 

Professor Ferguson, of the Academy, 
was also among those present, and 
gave a very interesting talk. Hon. Jos. 
W. Power, Sec’y of State, Messrs. A. 
W. Garroway, Albert Green, Arch 
Owen, Carter Sterling, Charles Ven- 
tress, Howard McGehee, Bob Bryant, 
B. B. Graves, Boyd Edwards, Carroth- 
ers Sullivan, and others of the alumni 
helped to make this gathering one of 
the most pleasant occasions of its kind 
in many years. 



Wednesday’s Scrimmage 



The football gang got their first real 
uial on Wednesday, when two selected 
Millsaps elevens clashed in the first 
scrimmage. No scores were counted, 
nor was any time kept. One side was 
given a trial in advancing the ball, and 
then the other. A large number of 
interested spectators watched the 
work out. Coach Freeland was in the 
midst of affairs, observing the men 
as they really worked and giving them 
necessary advice. 

All members of the squad were given 
at least a few minutes in the play to 
show what they could do. Reeves, 
Fowler, Lilly, and C. Galloway demon- 
strated ability to gain ground. The 
strongest showing was made in the 
way of defense. Both teams seemed 
able to prevent long gains by the op- 
ponents. A number of forward passes 
were swooped up by defensive players 
several times for substantial gains. 
Campbell, Scott, Stovall, McEwen, 
Musselwhite, Davenport, and others 
uid strong line work. 



GIRL ATHLETICS 
ENTHUSIASTIC 



Millsaps Co-eds Feel Confi- 
dent of Winning 
Team 



The prospects for girls’ basket-ball, 
so far as can be judged so early in the 
year, are very good. There is quite 
a bit of interest in this sport express- 
ed by the co-eds. Many of the girls 
who last year could not be persuaded 
to come to the Y. M. C. A. f-r prac- 
tice are asking of their own accord, 
“When is basket-ball practice going to 
begin?” Two star, players from Mad- 
ison Station — one a guard and the 
other a forward — have enrolled at Mill- 
saps and ought to form the nucleus of 
a good team. Last year none of the 
girls had played ‘varsity ball previous- 
ly. Four of the girls who were on 
the regular team are back this year, 
besides many who came out all the 
time for practice and who may be by 
now better than the team. Out of 
seventy-nine girls, there ought to be 
material for two or more good teams. 

Miss Israel has promised to coach 
the co-eds again this year, and every 
one knows her ability along this line. 
The team will not play any big school, 
but it is hoped that a good schedule 
can be arranged with other schools 
that are of equal experience in ath- 
letics. 



KAPPA ALPHAS 

GIVE SMOKER 



On the night of Thursday the 22, a 
quiet but pleasant gathering was enjoy- 
ed by a number of freshmen and K. A. 
alumni, who were the guests of the 
active chapter of Kappa Alpha at Mill- 
saps. The party was held at the chap- 
ter house on West St., where several 
affairs of this kind are given every 
year. 

The festivities were in the nature 
of a smoker. In one of the front rooms 
the center table was covered with 
fruit, surrounded by several forms of 
the "deadly weed”. In another room 
across the hall was the punch, neces- 
sary for the rescue of those who were 
in a state of exhaustion from too much 
talk. On the front porch was a negro 
jazz outfit that furnished music for 
the occasion. About the hour of nine 
thirty sandwiches were served to the 
“revelers”, after which the entertain- 
ment again centered around the talk 
which flo-ws so easily from mouths 
that are at the same time exhaling 
smoke. About ten-thirty the guests 
departed and the party broke up. 

The K. A’s. present besides the ac- 
tive chapter were: Messrs. M. C. 

White, J. R. Lin, I. C. Enochs, Hank 
Hilzim, A. Y. Harper, Niles Moseley, 
Wilkes Henry, Boyd Campbell, and Dr. 
J. E. McDill. Other guests were: Mes- 
srs. Watts. Sullivan, Fontaine, Wil- 
liams, Lewis, Bill Watkins, Paul Wil- 
liams, C. Galloway, W. Galloway, Tate, 
Bowers, McNair, Stuart, Gillis, Stovall, 
Corley, Cook, Sanders, and Cunning- 
ham. 



“WHAT THEY SAY TO “DEAR 
EDITOR” 

Bet He’s An Angler. 

Dear Eitor: My little ooy has 

worms, what shall I do to help him? 

Answer: Feed him lots of fish, they 
like ’em. 



THE BELLS 

(Apologies to Poe) 



Hear the pealing of the bells — 
Naughty bells — 

Just another hour of class-work their 
echo now foretells! 

How they tingle, tingle, tingle through 
the corridors and hall, 

While their never-ceasing jingle 
With our deep groans seem to mingle. 
(We don’t like those bells at all!) 

But ’tis time, time, time, 

Though it be a sunny clime. 

To flock inward at that ringing which 
so constantly wells 
From bells, bells, bells. 

Bells, bells, bells. 

From the tingling and the jingling of 
the bells. 



JACKSON STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

WHEN CLOTHES ARE DIRTY 
RING SEVEN THIRTY 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 



Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

I)R. E H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Hear the ringing of the bells — 

Happy bells — 

Just another hour of freedom their [ 
melody foretells! 

How they tingle, tingle, tingle through 
the corridors and halls, 

While that very merry jingle 
With our happy smiles doth mingle. 
(We don’t hate those bells at all!) 

For ’tis time, time, time, 

Since it is a sunny clime. 

To rush onward at that ringing which 
so pleasantly wells 
From the bells, bells, bells. 

Bells, bells bells — 

From the tingling and the jingling of 
the bells. 



Will You Be Enlisted As a 
Student Volunteer 



Have you heard the stirring call for j 
soldiers — soldiers to brave the jungles ‘ 
of Africa — soldiers to cross the plains j 
of South America, China, Japan or j 
India — soldiers whose primary object 
is to carry the gospel of Christ to 
save entire continents? Would you 
be a missionary? Yes? Then listen! 

Here at Millsaps College is ^n or- 
ganization for YOU. The Student Vol- 
unteer Band meets once a week and 
discusses mission problems of the 
different mission fields. Last year we 
gave a program before the entire stu- 
dent body; we sent eight delegates 
to the State Convention and the state 
president and vice-president are mem- 
bers of our band. The entire Band 
paid a visit to Mississippi College and 
gave a splendid program. 

This year we are expecting to do 
even better. All of our work has not 
as yet been planned, but on December : 
the second the State Convention will ! 
meet at Millsaps College and we ex- 
pect to show you just what the Stu- 
dent Volunteer Movement is. 

If you are thinking of being a mis- 
sionary. come out and join us. We j 
will be glad to have you. You will 
do us good and the table talks and 
missionary addresses will do you good. | 
All students are welcome at the j 
meetings. 

A VOLUNTEER. | 

PRENTISS SOCIETY 

REORGANIZED 



On Friday night of the first week j 
of school, the Academy met in the J 
study hall for the purpose of reorgan- 
izing the Prentiss Literary Society. 
Prof. Ferguson presided at the first 
meeting and assisted the old men in 
reorganizing and making plans for the 
The students take a keen in- 
terest in the activities of the society. 
They are already planning to enter 
into debates with various academies 
and high schools provided arrange- 
ments for such can be made. 



Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

What Last Year’s Graduates 
Are Doing 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Otto Porter is in Emory University 
continuing his study for the ministry. 

C. W. Wesley is also in Emory Uni- 
versity as a ministerial student. 

A. J. Boyles is doing home mission 
work in a saw mill community near 
Hattiesburg. 

B. M. Hunt is pastor of the Sharon 
charge. 

B. C. Edwards goes to Emory Uni- 
versity to study medicine. 

J. O. Rutledgi is at Quitman, teach- 
ing. 

O. G. Daw-kins is teaching at An- 
guilla. 

A. M. West is teaching at Collins. 

H. H. Langford is teaching. 

W. C. Edwards holds the position 
of principal of the Leland High School 
this year. 

P. & W. Warriors Prepare 
For Preps 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Coach Huntley has had his men hard 
at work since the opening of school, 
and they ought to be in great shape for 
their initial battle. Although they 
have lost several good men, they have 
a bunch of new men who are showing 
up well. It has been rumored that 
the preps really believe that they will 
defeat the collegians on the gridiron 
to-morrow. 

The college eleven will use straight 
football against the academy and at- 
tempt no trick plays, while it has been 
talked around that the Academy will 
attempt to spring several surprises 
on the college team. x 

With the Howard College game at 
Birmingham on the eighth of October 
staring them in the face, the Ma- 
jors will have to work hard and put 
out all that is in them in order to be 
in shape for the Alabama boys. The 
game w-ith the preps will largely de- 
termine who will make this team. So 
far the team has not had a real test, 
but from the present outlook we will 
have a fairly heavy line and a fast 
backfield that has the “pep”. 



Help-Mate. 

Dear Editor: Would you marry a 

girl on ten dollars a week? 

Answer: Yes, if she nad a steady 

job. 



Dear Editor: When 1 sing I get 

tears in my eyes. What can 1 do tor 
this? 

Answer: Stuff cotton in ’-our ears. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 



JOKES 



Warning to Freshmen 

Do not eat your sandwiches until 
the bell rings on Sunday evenings. 



The good-looking co-eds dye young. 



WANTED — A hair dresser whose per- 
manent wave will last a month. — 
Co-ed. 



Dad Tumlin, Attention! 

Soph: Do you shave yourself? 
Fresh: Yes, why? 

Soph: I thought it would be a 3hame 
to spend fifteen cents on that face. 



Page The Dog Catcher 

Lady: Oh, Mister, I have lost my 
dog! 

Man: What are you looking at me 
for? 



Ducky might have said: “A lot of 
fish would starve if it weren’t for a lot 
of people trying to catch them.” 



Aquatics 

Were you married in the spring? 
No, it was too wet there. 



Freshman Hudson would like to know 
who owns the Insane Asylum'. 



Cruel Thrust! 

She: I got my complexion from 

my father. 

He: He must be a druggist. 



Bowen: What was the golden calf 
made of? 

Peroxide Blonde: Gold. 



The Sun Sets 

Edd: Prof. White is a self-made 
man. 

Co-ed: Why didn’t he put some more 
hair on his head then? 



Dr. Watkins says it is bad for the 
soul and for the body when you miss 
breakfast. 



It is rumored that at next faculty 
meeting a bill will be passed requir- 
ing all students to have permission 
from the president before taking the 
weekly cold shower. 



All who "roll their own” are entitled 
to honorary membership in the Bull 
Durham Club. A meeting will be call- 
ed for organization soon, and all pros- 
pective members should watch for the 
announcement. 



The Phi Mu Sorority entertained a 
number of its friends with a party at 
the sorority room on Tuesday after- 
noon. Sandwiches, punch, mints, and 
Welsh rare-bit were served to the 
guests. 



Mr. William M. McColgan, a million- 
aire resident of McComb, announced 
the gift this week of $400,000.00 to be 
used by that city in erecting and 
equipping an industrial high school. 
This institution will be the first of its 
kind in Mississippi, and practically 
the first in the South. Therefore, this 
new school will attract widespread 
attention, and the announcement of 
the gift has attained great publicity 
already. 



John R. Bane, a senior of ’20, was 
on the campus this week. 



Many former students of the college 
were present at the opening exercises 
last Wednesday morning, and it was 
a great pleasure to us to have them 
with us. 




COACH FREELAND 



RULES FOR PURPLE 
AND WHITE SHORT ” 
STORY CONTEST 



1. Any student in Millsaps College 
shall be entitled to enter the contest. 

2. Each contestant shall present an 
original short story (typewritten and 
double-spaced) to the editor, such 
story not to exceed 2,000 words in 
length. 

3. The editor shall print such stor- 
ies as are suitable in the Purple and 
White. 

4. Those stories published shall be 
judged at the end of the session by 
a competent committee, the award be- 
ing made for interest and literary 
quality, the chief stress being upon the 
former. 

5. The winner of the contest shall 
receive five dollars in gold at Com- 
mencement. 

6. Entries for this contest cannot 
be used in the Clark Essay Medal Con- 
test. 

7. One student may make several 
entries. 



CLARK ESSAY 

MEDAL CONTEST 



The Clark Essay Medal is offered 
each year for the best four articles 
published in the Purple and White. 
This contest is open to all members 
of the student body, but, in order to 
qualify for entrance, a student must 
have as many as six articles published 
in the paper in the course of the year. 
At the end of the session he selects 
any four of these and enters them in 
the contest. 

Competent judges pick the winner 
of the medal which is awarded at 
Commencement. 

Hand articles for the paper to the 
editor, and, if suitable for publication, 
they will be published and can be en- 
tered in the contest. You do not have 
to be on the staff to win the medal. 



Masonic Club Meeting 

The Millsaps Masonic Club, of which 
W. N. Ware is president, met on Wed- 
nesday evening for the first time this 
session. The purpose of the gather- 
ing was the discussion of plans for the 
year, and a survey of the number of 
members in school. M. M. McGowan, 
Modern language professor in the 
Academy, is secretary of the organiza- 
tion. This club was organized last 
year under the leadership of A. J. 
Boyles: and the present officers were 
elected at the last meeting of the 1920- 
21 session. 



Y. M. C. A. MEETING 



The goodly number of new men who 
were out at the prayer meeting of the 
Y. M. C. A. last Friday night was an 
inspiration to every heart present. 
Every seat in the hall was taken by 
the students, who entered heartily in- 
to the worship in song and prayer con- 
ducted by M. L. McCormick. 

W. N. Ware conducted the devotion- J 
al services, reading the 139th Psalm, 
containing those matchless passages 
concerning God’s all-seeing providence 
and concluding with David’s fervent 1 
prayer for sincerity. This psalm had 
a message for every student present. 

President Watson then took charge 
and spoke a few words on the purpose 
and plans of the Y. M. C. A., bringing 
out the plans for Bible study in the j 
dormitories and in the Student Volun- 
teer meetings. He also announced 
that there would be a students’ prayer 
service fifteen minutes before the reg- ; 
ular devotional meeting hereafter. 

Two members of the faculty were 
present and were given opportunity 
to speak. Dr. Sullivan urged that, as 
each student must preach a sermon | 
each day of his life, he come to the J 
“Y” and learn to preach it rightly. } 
Prof. Bowen expressed his interest in i 
the students and stated that he would j 
be glad to help solve any problem that 
might come up or to be of service in 
any way to the students. This con- j 
eluded the meeting. 



PI KAPPA ALPHAS 

ENTERTAIN 



The social activities of Alpha Iota 
Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha opened last 
Saturday night with a smoker given 
at the chapter house on Alexander 
Avenue. Refreshments consisting of 
punch, sandwiches, fruit and “smokes” 
were enjoyed by all. Later in the 
evening the boys were entertained by 
John Harris, who demonstrated the 
Jiu Jitsu and other feats of physical 
prowess. The bunch also tuned up 
and entertained the surrounding neigh- 
borhood by songs. Besides the mem- 
bets of the chapter and a number of 
alumni, the following men were pres- 
ent: Lewis, Ellis, C. Galloway, W. Gal- 
loway, Calhoun, Brumfield, Williams, 
Knoblock, Murray, Lester, Lumpkin. 



Rhodes Scholarships Open 
for Southern College Men 

Rhodes scholars will be appointed 
i by 32 states, including Tennessee, Vir- 
| ginia, Alabama. Arkansas, Georgia, 
j and Mississippi, December 3rd, to take 
I up residence at Oxford University in 
October, 1922. All applications, testi- 
monials, references, etc., must be in 
the hands of the respective state com- 
mittees before October 29th. It is 
practically useless for undergraduates 
j to apply for appointment. Young 
alumni under 25 years of age, who are 
doing graduate or professional study, 
or are engaged in teaching or are 
pursuing other intellectual pursuits, 
are the most likely candidates. Judg- 
ing from past observation, we should 
say that an athletic record and gifts 
for social leadership, along with schol- 
I astic and literary attainments, are es- 
sential to appointment. The scholar- 
ships pay 350 pounds sterling annual- 
ly and the appointment is for three 
years. Almost any line of study may 
be pursued with advantage. — Ex. 
l 



RULES OF FACULTY 
AS TO ATTENOANCE 
ON CLASSES 



1. Each student is permitted to 
have one absence in each class in each 
term of 12 weeks for which he shall 
not be required to account. 

2. A student absent for any cause ■ 
including sickness, more than one time 
from a class in any term shall be re- 
quired to stand an extra written ex- 
amination on the subject, which ex- 
amination shall be given at a time to 
be chosen by the professor, and at a 
period not included in the regular 
schedule of the student, provided that 
this examination shall take place with- 
in the half-term (six weeks) in which 
the examination becomes due. 

3. When absences are due to sick- 
ness the grade made on the extra ex- 
amination shall be recorded in the 
place of each absence and averaged 
in the student’s daily grade. For this 
no fee shall be charged. 

4. In the case of unexcused absen- 
ces due to any cause other than sick- 
ness the grade made on the examina- 
tion shall be recorded in the place of 
each absence and averaged in the stu- 
dents daily grades, provided that no 
grade made in the extra examination 
shall be valued at more than seventy 
per cent (70%). A fee of $2.00 shall be 
charged for .each examination given 
in such cases. 

5. Evidence of sickness shall be 
provided in the form of a physician’s 
certificate, filed with a petition for 
excuse, with the Secretary of the Fac- 
ulty, as soon as the student resumes 
attendance on classes. 

6. The secretary of the Faculty 
shall report at the hi-weekly meeting 
of the Faculty a list of names whose 
absences are covered by a physician’s 
certificate. 

7. Any student whose absences are* 
not accounted for by a physician’s cer- 
tificate shall be reported by the pro- 
fessors to the president at the bi-week- 
ly meeting of the Faculty. 

8. The penalty for absence from 
chapel shall be five demerits for each 
absence. 



CLIPPED FROM THE 
MISSISSIPPI* 



One Strike. 

“Mike,” said the judge sternly, “The 
testimony shows that you hit this man 
twice.” 

“I did not, y’r honor,” declared the 
defendant stoutly. “The fur-rest time I 
hit him I missed him.” 

— American Legion Weekly. 



She — “Mother said I should not wear 
this one-piece bathing suit.” 

He — “You ought to follow your moth- 
er’s advice.” 



She — What are you thinking about? 
He — Just what you are thinking 
about. 

She — If you do, I’ll scream. 



No Wooden Money. 

Sid Berry — “Have you any board 
money, Freshman?” 

Freshman — “Naw, I got paper 

money.” 



Dr. Bell, in economics class-“Is Mr. 
Alexander present?” 

Schwartz — “No, sir, he’s working.” 




Coming Friday and Saturday 

September 30 Oct. 1 THE MAJESTIC 

Richard Barthelmess and n in n n ■ 

Carol Dempem in D. W. Griffith S TIlB L0V6 FIO WGF 



The coolest and best ventilated 
Theatre in Mississippi 



Majestic Orchestra 



Three men and a girl are stranded on a desolate South Sea 
Island— Here is Romance and adventure and the storv of a <nri«’ 
supreme heroism. 6 



Shows 2-4-6-8 



! 



ISTRIONE 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY— 

Mack Sennett’s 

Big Five-Reel Comedy 

“A Small Town 
Idol” 



The most stupendous comedy 
production ever produced. 

Cast includes: 

Ben Turpin, Marie Prevost, 
Charlie Murry,' Phyllis Haver. 

PRICES 10c and 25c 

Coming Monday and Tuesday — 
October 3-4 
Lionel Barrymore in 
“JIM THE PENMAN” 



LOCALS 



Miss Katherine Howie has returned 
to Millsaps College after a short so- 
Jjoum at Agnes Scott College. 



Frank K. Mitchell, editor oi the Pur- 
ple and White in 1918-19 and recently 
an instructor at the University of 
| Michigan, visited some of his friends 
on the campus Saturday and Sunday. 
He was passing through Jackson on 
I his way to New York, whence he takes 
ship on October the fourth for Eng- 
land. Mitchell will enter Oriel College 
at Oxford University as one of Missis- 
sippi’s Rhodes Scholars. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery- 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR JOHN C. CARTER 

TRADE JEWELER 

FORD’S DRUG STORE " " 



Capitol and Mill Sts. The Gift shop 



Jackson, Miss. 



B. O. Van Hook, a graduate of Mill- 
saps, spent several days here last 
week, before he went to Vanderbilt 
to take up graduate work there. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 

Warburton Plumbir.g 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, <£ 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



Robert Cooper, a former student 
here, stopped in Jackson last week 
on his way to the University of Penn- 
sylvania, where he goes to enter the 
medical school. 



Miss Margaret Rowsey of Laurel, 
formerly a student at Newcomb, is ex- 
pected on the campus this week. 



Mrs. Clark, the assistant librarian, 
of the Millsaps-Carnegie Library, is out 
j after a recent illness. Her many 
^ friends on the campus are very glad 
j to see her again at the library. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

United States, Hinds County and City Depository 

Capital paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus earned 225,000.00 

Undivided profits, net 25,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Mrs. James Sells has been sick for 
1 several days. 



! 

♦V 



Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 
at the 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 



Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



The party of surveyors who have 
; been at work on the driveways of the 
campus for the last few days have at- 
j tracted much notice. Their activity 
gives promise of much needed improve- 
ment in the way of accommodations 
for the many automobiles that throng 
the space about the buildings during 
class hours 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



OR/HtC 



CherO'Cola! 






FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBER 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 



Dr. Sullivan has revived his out-door 
Sunday School class in Smith Park, 
after allowing it to fall into non-ex- 
istence for several years. This class 
should be very popular with the Mill- 
saps students, as a special class for 
them, because of the comfort of sit- 
ting in the park. This class became 
famous several years ago, and there 
is no reason why it should not again. 



A number of the alumni hr.ve 
attending football practice as inter- 
ested spectators and earnest support- 
I ers. These men are of great servics 
j to Millsaps, and their many good deeds 
jlast year and this year will long be 
remembered. 



“BARKER BREAD" 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



MEET ME AT THE 



CRESCLNTkBILLIARD HALL 



i iUnder New Management 

O. S. JOHNSON, Proprietor 

I 



Next to New Millsaps Bldg. 



I Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
| tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 
Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



ENGRAVED 



WEDDING INVITATIONS— ANNOUNCEMENTS j 
CRESTS — CARDS 



MONCGRAMMED STATIONERY FOR LADIES 
BUSINESS STATIONERY 

ONLY ENGRAVING PLANT IN MISSISSIPPI 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



V 




Jlurpl? mb 







QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



Vol. XIV. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCT. 7, 1921 



No. 3 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIA- 
TION ELECTS OFFICERS 



‘Pep’ Meeting Follows Elec- 
tion; Freeland Talks. 

The students met in the College 
Chapel Monday evening, Oct. 3, at 
7 o’clock to elect officers for the Ath- 
letic Association for the present ses- 
sion. The meeting was called to order 
by E. K. Windham, who read portions 
of the constitution of the Association, 
designating the offices to be filled and 
the duties of each officer. After he 
had read these extracts and made a 
few explanatory remarks, he an- 
nounced that nominations for presi- 
dent of the association were in order. 
Windham, Musselwhite, Stokes and 
Reeves were nominated, and after a 
rising vote Reeves was declared elect- 
ed. After making an excellent speech, 
pledging his best service to the asso- 
ciation and expressing his apprecia- 
tion of the confidence of the students 
in him, he took the chair. 

The business of election was con- 
tinued by the nomination of M. L. Mc- 
Cormick and James Campbell for vice- 
president. McCormick was elected. 
Then the chair heard nominations for 
the office of secretary and treas- 
urer. Collins was nominated and a 
motion was made to close the nomina- 
tions and make Mr. Collins’ election 
unanimous. The motion carried and 
Collins was unanimously elected. Then 
nominations for student manager were 
in order, and J. T. Coursey and Wind- 
ham were nominated. Coursey was 
elected. Then the business of election 
was continued by the election of stu- 
dent managers for the various sports. 
W. B. Fowler was unanimously elected 
manager of football, the nomination of 
Musslewhite having been withdrawn at 
his request. McEwen and Reeves were 
(Continued on page 6) 



KIT KATS AGAIN ACTIVE 



The Kit Kat Chapter of the Sigma 
Upsilon literary fraternity, has be- 
gun its year’s work with its usual use- 
ful and pleasant activity. This club is 
composed of men from the faculty, 
junior class and senior class — these 
men usually being chosen for some 
literary ability or scholarship record. 
Kit Kat has meetings regularly about 
every month or three weeks, some 
member entertaining and reading an 
original paper, which is criticized pro 
and con. 

The members of Kit Kat that re- 
turned this year are Prof. White, Prof. 
Noble, Prof. Ferguson, Prof. Huntley, 
Fred Lotterhos, and Mack Swearin- 
gen. The first meeting of the club this 
year will be with Lotterhos as host, en- 
tertaining at the Kappa Alpha house 
on West street. At this gathering the 
new men will be initiated. Those to 
become members are Henry Collins, 
Waiter Stokes, M. M. McGowan, and K. 
K. Windham. The whole club antici- 
pates a good meeting and a successful 
year. 




DUCKY SAYS— 

I suppose the courage of 
a bull dog will always be a 
mystery to a rabbit. 



McEWEN ELECTED Vice- 
Pres. OF Y. M. C. A. 



Jim Sells to Handle Funds 



Last Friday night a goodly number 
of the students attended the Y. M. C. 
A. in the college chapel. Those that 
went enjoyed .themselves and those 
that didn’t missed the finest part of 
the week. 

You want to know what was oh? 
You want to know what you missed? 

The first thing you missed was 
some mighty good mass singing. The 
halls rang with such songs as, “Take 
Time to Be Holy,” “He Will Hold Me 
Fast,” and “Stand Up for Jesus.” 

Jim Sells led the first prayer. Then 
Jesse Watson sprang something. 
Man, but didn’t it make your heart feel 
good, if you were there, to hear the 
male quartette, composed of M. L. Mc- 
Cormick, C. L. McCormick, Fred Mc- 
Ewen, and R. T. Hollingsworth, sing 
that glorious hymn, “God Never For- 
gets.” God forgives our sins and he 
rewards our righteous deeds, but he 
never forgets them. This was well 
expressed in a short talk by our 
President. 

In concluding his talk on the “Un- 
forgetfulness of God,” Watson asked 
us all to bow in silent prayer and ask 
God for the things that we need. Rev. 
G. E. Allen closed this prayer. 

Then after singing that song of the 
church militant, “Stand Up for Jesus,” 
the house was thrown open for nomina- 
tions for vice-president. Brooks, Mc- 
Ewen, and Lotterhos were nominated. 
On taking the vote, it was found that 
the race would have to be run out be 
tween Lotterhos and McEwen. The 
votes were cast, Lotterhos 29, McEwen 
29. The President was about to cas' 
the deciding vote when in marched 
some freshmen who cast their votes 
(Continued on page 2) 



I 






LAMAR SOCIETY 
CONTINUES GROWTH 

Snappy Program Rendered 
On Friday Night 

The Lamar Literary Society held its 
second meeting of the year on Friday 
night. Eight new members were add- 
ed to the Society. 

The president, W. E. Stokes, was in- 
stalled by F. J. Lotterhos, temporary 
chairman. Thereupon, Stokes took the 
chair and proceeded with the meeting. 
He delivered a stirring inaugural ad- 
dress, after which he installed the 
other newly elected officers. The list 
was as follows: M. B. Swearingen, 

vice-president; H. C. Young, secre- 
tary: J. B. Abney, treasurer; H. H. 

Knoblock, corresponding secretary; F. 
J. Lotterhos, critic; J. E. Tumlin, cen- 
sor; J. R. Hillman, sergeant-at-arms; 
and G. E. Clark, chaplain. 

The first number on the program 
was a declamation by E. E. Windham, 
(Continued on page 2) 



GALLOWAYS COMPARE 
U. S. AND GREAT DRIT. 



Committee to Revise Con- 
stitution of Society 

\t'hen the “Great White Chieftain" 
has given up his leadership of Missis- 
sippi’s easily led element, it will not 
be hard to find a successor. The 
Right Honorable Breezy Reeves, of 
the Galloway Literary Society will 
be the first applicant, at least he 
should be. At 'the last meeting of the 
said society he swayed his -hearers 
with his matchless oratory, making a 
plea for a decision in his favor. His 
speech was one of the special treats 
of the evening. 

The attendance was very good; the 
program was very well carried out; 
the spirit wash fine. Several new men 
were taken in, and the old men seemed 
to take a renewed interest in the 
work of the meeting. The unspoken 
theme of the meeting seemed to be 
that of making the literary activities 
as prominent as any activity of the 
college. 

The orator of the evening, Fresh- 
man M. S. Watson, spoke on the sub- 
ject “Who is an American?” His 
speech was fiery, though short. The 
declaimer, “S'enator” Gore, impressed 
the fact on the men present that there 
was something “Farther On.” At this 
time “Timberbarrel” Hollingsworth 
interrupted the proceedings and asked 
permission to absent himself so he 
might keep a date with his wife. Of 
course, this was refused. 

A preacher will preach no matter 
where you put him, and when the de- 
bate “Resolved: That the United 

States has had more influence for 
good than Great Britain.” was called 
several sermons were sprung on th° 
audience. Breezy convinced hi“ 
(Continued on page 2, top of column) 



COLLEGIANS DEFEAT 
PREPS IN FIRST TILT 



Fowler Intercepts Pass, 
Runs Twenty Yards 
For Touchdown 

Coach Freeland’s huskies defeated 
the Academy team on the college ath- 
letic field last Monday afternoon by 
the close score of 6 to 0. The game 
was hard fought throughout by the 
Preps and several times they made 
gains around the Collegians' ends. 
The college team put up a wonderful 
defensive game, the highly touted 
Reynolds, of the Prep School, being 
unable to make any gains against the 
Purple and White wall of defense. 
Chick Nelson played a great defensive 
game for the Preps, but he too was 
unable to rip the Purple line for any 
substantial gains. The Collegians 
lacked an offense. Several times when 
scores were in sight some back would 
fumble and the chance would be gone. 
The whole game was marred by fre- 
quent fumbles on both sides. There 
were no stars for the college team, al- 
though Fowler made the touchdown 
after intercepting a forward pass in 
the first quarter and made several 
broken field runs. The entire team 
were good on breaking down the Prep 
offensive but were very weak when 
called upon to run interference. 

Capt. Nelson, of the Academy, won 
the toss and chose to kick. He\ kicked 
far into the Collegians territory to Gal- 
loway, who returned the ball to mid- 
field. After three unsuccessful at- 
tempts to ram the Prep line, S’tovall 
was called back to punt. “Snow” punt- 
ed for forty yards, Reeves recovering 
the ball after Reynolds had fumbled. 
The Preps again held the College for 
downs. The Preps, however, were un- 
able to gain a yard and Nelson booted 
to Fowler, who was downed in his 
tracks by Reynolds. Reeves on an off- 
tackle play made eight yards. Tate 
lost four and again the College was 
held for downs. Stovall punted to the 
Prep ten yard line, Reynolds being 
downed in his tracks by McNair. The 
Preps then attempted to forward pass. 
Fowler intercepted on the twenty yard 
line and ran for a touchdown. Mussel- 
white failed to kick goal. This play 
ended the first quarter. 

The Preps again chose to kick to the 
College in the second quarter. This en- 
tire quarter was devoid of any spe- 
cially good football, both sides making 

(Continued on page 6) 



CHEER LEADER OF- 
FERS PRIZE FOR SONG 



At the PEP meeting Monday night 
W. E. Stokes, Cheer Leader, offered 
a cash prize of $3.00 to the student 
who would write the best college 
football song to the tune of “Mar- 
gie”. Everybody knows this snappy 
tune. Go to it. Try your hand. Win 
three dollars and above all things 
HELP YOUR SCHOOL AND TEAM. 







2 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



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LAMAR SOCIETY 

(Continued from page 1) 
hearers that he believed what he said, 
and consequently was the main factor 
in winning the debate. In fact out of 
the four speeches, his was the only 
one in which any points were clearly 
brought out and upheld. Sandlin 
helped Reeves uphold the affirmative, 
while Lee and S. E. Johnson held 
down the negative. It was the first 
time that some of them had spoken on 
the floor of the society; so, in view of 
this, they acquitted themselves well. 

A very comical impromptu debate 
followed in which Jim Sharp and Mc- 
Ewen tried to prove against Mussle- 
white and Ware that a chicken could 
roost on a square pole better than 
on a round one. The house decid- 
ed in favor of the negative. 

Mrs. Jim Sells was taken in as an 
honorary member of the Society. A 
committee was appointed to revise, if 
necessary, the by-laws and constitu- 
tion and have a reprint made, so that 
a copy can be given to each member 
of the society. So far thirty-five new 
men have been taken in. They are 
mighty fine material with which to 
work, so the Galloways are planning 
to do their part in defeating the de- 
bating opponents of Millsaps. 



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GALLOWAYS COMPARE 

(Continued from page 1) 
who rendered Burns’ poem, “A Man’s a 
Man for a’ That,” with a forceful and 
eloquent introduction. The next num- 
ber was a very spirited oration by 
J. B. Abney, who used as his sub- 
ject “The Need of Educated Men to 
Run the World.” 

The subject for debate was: Re- 

j solved. That the new cut system should 
be abolished and the old reinstated. 
The affirmative was upheld by Wat- 
son and Lotterhos; the negative, by 
Joyner and Knoblock. The affirmative 
maintained that the new system of 
cuts is impractical, unfair and unjust 
to the student. The negative insisted 
that the old system had been so abused 
that R was harmful to the student and 
that the new plan will promote better 
studying. The affirmative was ad- 
judged the winner. 

Much amusement was afforded by 
the impromptu debate, "Resolved, That 
co-eds with bobbed hair should be ex- 
cluded from Millsaps College.” The 
affirmative was represented by Collins 
and Sistrunk; the negative, by O’Fer- 
rall and Shearer. The affirmative tried 
to show that girls with bobbed hair 
are frivolous and do not make good 
students. The negative explained that 
bobbed hair is a great convenience to 
girls. They further asserted that 
bobbed hair is up-to-date and that the 
Millsaps co-eds who bob their hair 
are thus keeping Millsaps in the fore- 
front of progress. The negative won 
by an overwhelming majority. 



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McEWEN ELECTED VICE-PRES. 

(Continued from page 1) 
for McEwen, making the final score 
read, McEwen 33, Lotterhos 29. 

The next problem before the house 
was to find a man who could be trust- 
ed with the funds of the association. 
The names of Ross Moore, and James 
W. Sells were proposed. The assem- 
bly decided for the latter and so James 
W. Sells was elected treasurer. 

Each of the new officers announced 
that he would do his best. But we 
were not through with speeches. Wat- 
son made promises about some big 
speakers from town, and Dr. Sullivan 
said that the prospects for obtaining 
the Student Activities Building seemed 
to be good. 



THE VARDAMAN RALLY 



As Seen by Our Special 
Correspondent 

“In August of 1922 there will be an 
election in our commonwealth. Only 
ten short months, and the ‘good pee- 
pul’ of Mississippi will betake them- 
selves from the cotton fields and 
march to the polls to right the wrong 
that was perpetrated in 1918. Yes, the 
fair State of Mississippi will arise 
from the mire into which she sank 
three years ago and be cleansed, and 
even as the great State of Georgia 
has again honored her battle-scarred 
prophet, Tom Watson, likewise will 
we, the free white electorate of Mis- 
sissippi, once more place in the high- 
est tribunal of the nation our own 
James K. Vardaman. Yes, after three 
years of wandering in the wilderness 
under the guidance of such renegades 
as John Sharp Williams and Pat Har- 
rison we have at last heard the voice 
of inspired leadership and will once 
more repose our trust in the ‘Great 
White Chief.” 

These and similar utterances could 
be heard on every hand last Thursday 
at the Vardaman Rally. Although I 
realized that I was taking my life in 
my hands, I went. The Purple and 
White must have a representative at 
this epochal meeting, and if it was 
necessary for anyone to sacrifice him- 
self to this end I was willing to be 
the goat. So pulling my hat well down 
over my eyes, I sallied forth. But no 
sooner had I entered the Fair grounds 
than I found that my suspicions had 
been fully justified. I was in great 
danger. At any moment some fervent 
follower of James K. might suspect 
that I was an anti — and then the Pur- 
ple and White would have to go to 
press without an account of the fes- 
tivities, and the readers thereof would 
have to depend on the Daily News for 
their information. Desperate situa- 
tions call for desperate measures. Oh, 
if I only had the gift of black magic 
and could have summoned a full set 
of whiskers to spring, Juno-like, from 
my freshly shaved countenance! That 
would be a disguise par excellence, 
but as it was I had to adopt more 
prosaic and natural means of defense. 
At this juncture my thoughts were 
rudely broken by a noise not unlike 
that of water escaping from a fire 
hose. I gave a quick jump backwards 
and barely escaped being immersed 
in a stream of liquid nicotine which 
a big Vardamanite, forgetful of his 
surroundings in the heat of a politi- 
cal discussion, had sent in my direc- 
tion. This near calamity gave me an 
idea. I reached for my can of P. A., 
took out a goodly mouthful, and at 
regular intervals gave a perfect exhi- 
bition of being a bona fide member of 
the free white Democracy of Missis- 
sippi. I was now perfectly safe. 

First on the program was a short 
speech from Swep J. Taylor, master of 
ceremonies, at the conclusion of which 
they unveiled a flag-covered picture 
of Senator Vardaman. Swep pulled 
the strings as he has been known to 
do before: and after much tugging 
the flags reluctantly fell back, dis- 
playing to the worshipful audience 
the photographic likeness of the Sen- 
ator, while the Senator himself sat 
on the platform in modest approval. 
At this patriotic exhibition I thought 
I detected thrills running up and down 
my spinal column. Happening to 
glance around suddenly, I found that 
it was not thrills but a stick of red 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



PROF. BOWEN TALKS KAPPA DELTA 
TO Y. W. C. A. MEMBERS DINNER PARTY 



The Y. W. C. A. held its second 
meeting of the year at the hut on 
Thursday at 1 o’clock. Anna Belle 
Craft, the vice-president, presided 
in the absence of the president. She 
greeted the new girls, and welcomed 
them as regular members. 

After the devotional exercises, which 
were led by Nellie Clark, the meeting 
was turned over to the undergraduate 
representative. Belle Lindsey. A de- 
tailed explanation was given about the 
work of this office — why it was es- 
tablished and the relation of this chap- 
ter of the Y. W. C. A. to the National 
Board. This was the first of four pro- 
grams to be arranged by this office, 
which will show the girls how to fill 
the various angles of the triangle. The 
speaker at this meeting was Profes- 
sor Bowen, who talked on the angle of 
religious education as it is applied to 
a well rounded life of the college girl. 
This was. indeed, one of the most 
inspirational and enlightening talks 
ever made before this organization. 
All of the girls went away from the 
meeting, talking about taking work in 
the new department of religious ed- 
ucation. 

Following this talk, there was a 
short business session, after which 
the meeting was adjourned. 



The alumnae of Mu Chapter of 
Kappa Delta Sorority entertained the 
active Chapter and some of the new 
co-eds at a lovely dinner party at 
Frankinson’s on Tuesday evening. 
The table was beautifullly decorated 
with white roses, the sorority’s flower. 
At every plate there was a dainty 
corsage bouquet of white rose buds 
and white sweet peas, which added 
much to the beauty of the table. 

After each girl had found her place 
by the beautifully band-painted place 
card, the talented Miss Maynard Mc- 
Lean rendered a lovely solo dance. 
Little Miss McLean was quite charm- 
ing in her oriental costume and added 
much to the pleasure of the evening. 
A delightful menu was served, in 
between the courses of which many 
Kappa Delta songs were sung. The 
guests, aside from the active chapter, 
were Misses Wills, Bland, Remfry. 
Curtis, Smith, Watkins, Weeks, Buf- 
| kin. Tucker, Thompson, Morsen. 
Morrison, Pate, Craig, Morley, and 
Flowers. 

“Go to the aunt, thou sluggard!” 

He went — she would give him no 
more; 

So he had to go to his uncle 
Where oft he had been before. 

— Boston Transcript. 



and white striped candy propelled by 
the lusty hands of a future Vardaman i 
man, that was being rubbed up and 
down my back. Smiling sweetly at 
the dear little thing, I nevertheless 
moved my seat. The Uon. Swep was 
followed by the still more Hon. Lee 
M. Russell, known to some as the 
present Governor of Mississippi. Our 
Chief Executive said just what was 
expected of him and sat down. He 
was followed by several lesser lights 
from various parts of the State who, 
one and all, proclaimed their love, ad- 
miration. and devotion of the ex and 
future Senator in fervent, if ungram- 
matical, language. 

After having their appetites whet- 
ted, mentally speaking, by these pa- 
triotic utterances, the people adjourned 
to the south side of the Fair grounds, 
where they were satisfied in a more 
strictly physical sense with barbecued 
beef, pickles, bread, and coffee. This 
barbecued “bull” that was dished out 
was a very fitting entree for the still 
bigger dose of the same material that 
was dispensed in the raw form from 
the platform that afternoon. It is sad 
to relate, however, that the plans of 
the commissary department went 
awry and there was much meat left 
over. As a result of this miscalcula- 
tion, it was a common sight to see a 
great majority of the free white elec- 
torate of Mississippi, male and female, 
walking around with big hunks of bar- 
becued meat under each arm. We 
are afraid, however, that harm will 
result from this overdose of Vardaman 
bull. Joe Abney has been behaving 
queerly for the last few days, and 
whenever anyone mentions Vardaman 
a fierce light comes into his eyes and 
he expresses himself in terms that do 
not meet with the approval of the Y. 
M. C. A. or the Preachers’ League. 

Now comes the chef d'oeuvre of this 
great political festival. The Hon. Hol- 
stein Taylor, followed by Senator Var- 
daman and his secretary, mounted-the 
platform and bowed graciously to the 
cheering multitude. Grouped around 



the platform was a collection of no- 
tables and near notables who were 
quite willing to do their part in free- 
ing Mississippi from the clutches of 
the demagogue. Included in this group 
was every Vardaman man with a loud 
voice who is known two miles beyond 
| the confines of his native hamlet. One 
by one these faithful satellites were 
called to the platform, where each de 
livered a stirring address after the 
same formula. They each declared 
their unswerving devotion to the Sen- 
ator, said that they hailed from the 
strongest Vardaman county in the 
State, and came to a glorious close by 
declaring in prophetic tones that Var- 
daman would be elected to the Senate 
by a 50,000 majority. 

After two hours of these vocal fire- 
works, those who survived were treat 
ed to a forty minute speech by ex- 
Governor Bilbo. And let it be said 
to the Governor’s credit that he made 
a fine speech. Perhaps the most strik- 
ing part of it was that concerning 
Fred Sullens. As most of our readers 
are aware, the editor of the Daily 
News has several times been guilty 
of saying unkind things of Bilbo and 
Vardaman. Bilbo evidently believes 
in fighting fire with fire, for when he 
had finished he had left nothing bad 
unsaid about poor Frederick. He 
placed the unhappy editor in a dif- 
ferent category from mankind in gen- 
eral, saying that a special genesis was 
necessary to produce such a creature 
Joe Abney can supply the necessary 
details. 

In answer to repeated calls of Var- 
daman! Vardaman! that gentleman 
himself at last arose and very gravely 
and decorously thanked them for their 
support. Not a word of bitterness 
escaped his lips. It was not neces- 
sary. All the available mud had been 
slung. The victims were nicely plas- 
tered up, and it only remained for the 
Great hite Chief himself to speak 
to them in a fatherly tone and wish 
them much happiness — and to be sure 
to go to the polls. 



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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 ) 

Additional Subscription 1.00 | 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 


Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post { 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each ' 
Saturday. 

1 


STAFF 






















J. W. Sells 1 






REPORTERS— H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray. O. B 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, 
Shearer. 


Triplett, R. H. Moore, 1 
Leigh Watkins, J. B. | 


MANAGEMENT 










Cl TT TTphort ! 




THE HONOR SYSTEM 




The honor system as it exists here is one of 


the most valuable [ 



institutions in the college. One of the prime purposes of Millsaps 
College is to train its students into men and women of high charac- 
ter: and one of the first marks of high character is strict honesty 
with self and neighbor. Such strict honesty entails the standing of 
all examinations in an honorable way. 

There is where the honor system comes into its usefulness. It 
encourages the man who is trying to do right; and it makes things 
hot for the miscreant who trys to cheat. The whole purpose of j 
the system is good. Therefore, if anyone has any criticisms of it. 
he should use them to improve it and not to attack it. Every stud- | 
ent should be ready to support to the fullest a plan that has for its 
olvjeet the elimination of dishonesty and the development of high | 
character. 

The recent chapel talks of Prof. Lin on this subject have made 
the system very plain; and it is to be hoped that the honor system | 
will meet with universal support and approval this year. 



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PEP AND REP 



That man you heard about with that big “rep” got it because 
of his “pep”. He may be a preacher, a football “ram”, a crook, 
a lawyer, a head hunter, or a cheer leader. Pep gave him his rep. 

Whoever accomplished anything without enthusiasm, steam, vim, 
push, and all the rest? Nobody did. It can’t be done. 

Suppose a man lived a thousand years on this earth instead of 
fifty or sixty. That would be ideal, would it? But suppose he 
spent that thousand years in a state of cold, clammy, rest — no doing, 
no accomplishment. That would never do. 

Twenty-five years of living — real, strenuous, manly living — is 
worth all of time the other way. Is that right? 

Pep, pep, pep — that’s the stuff. Put it in everything. 

Let people know that you are interested in what you are doing. 
“Bust the line wide open if you are a football man. Pull down 
some high class marks, whoever you may be. Don’t be one of the 
crowd that looks on always. Get busy doing something. What is 
that thing that you can do better than anybody else in the world? 
Find it and do it. 

Maybe you lack confidence in yourself. Then, get it. Nobody 
will have it in you, if you don’t yourself. 

Be a man with a rep. The way to be that is plain. 

Put out the pep. 

Anybodv can do that. Are vou anvbody? 




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Unsolicited contributions to the paper are coming in now. 
That is just what we want. Unfortunately, we cannot publish all of 
them. Give us yours, though, and we’ll try to use it. If your article 
is not published, write another better one and turn it in. Make a 
try in the Clark Essay contest and the short story contest. Give us 
your poems, humorous sketches, short stories, jokes, and all your 
other literary efforts. We want them. 



Mississippi College’s victory over Tulane last week was a pleas- 
ant surprise to us. We congratulate our neighbors on their success. 



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1 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 



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IMPRESSIONS OF A 
FRESHMAN ON EN- 
TERING MILLSAPS 



Most upper classmen when they 
read the heading of this article — if 
they hark back to the first time they 
passed beneath the friendly oaks that 
adorn the campus of Millsaps — will no 
doubt say that no freshman can be 
impressed with anything but his own 
importance. Nevertheless, I was im- 
pressed in several ways on entering 
Millsaps. 

When I walked into the Administra- 
tion Building, the first person I met 
was Dr. Watkins, whom I afterwards 
learned to be the President He es- 
corted me into Chapel, where the stu- 
dent body was assembled for the 
morning exercises. The order there 
impressed me, as everyone was all 
attention, and scarcely a dozen were 
aware of the fact that a stranger was 
in the hall. 

After chapel exercises. Dr. Watkins 
ushered me into his office, where a 
talk with him gave me the impres- 
sion that he had the interest of every 
student at heart. He seemed to accept 
the role of father to every student; 
and I am sure that any student who 
has a problem pertaining to anything 
outside of school life and goes to Dr. 
Watkins for advice will receive the 
best counsel and aid in solving it. 

The faculty is composed of men 
who are well fitted morally and ment- 
ally for the positions they hold and 



ooooooooooctxyooooooooooooo 

OPEN FORUM 

OOCOOOCXDOOCOOOOCiOOOOCOOOOO 



MUSINGS OF A SOPH. 



It's all so queer. I mean this sudden 
landing on solid earth after my fresh- 
man year in college. The fact is, I 
can't take it in yet. I’ve always had 
a rep for taking in things pretty rapid- 
ly too, but maybe the only reason I’ve 
been taking things in so readily is be- 
cause it's all been light stuff. And 
now, when I come back to the same 
old school that I left only three months 
ago, I can just feel the difference. 
Maybe this difference has been here 
all the time, but in my freshman 
blindness of mind I just couldn’t see 
it. Freshmen use their eyes more 
than any other of their five senses 
anyway — unless it is their sense of 
taste — not along the artistic line, 
however, but the sense of enjoyment 
they get out of hearing a paper bag 
rattle or a “coke” bottle clink. As 
I have just said, freshmen use their 
eyes. Give one a text book full of pic- 
tures and he is satisfied. He loves 
pictures because he understands 
them. But watch his disgust when, 
upon opening a new text book and 
turning the leaves flippantly, he 
doesn’t find a few pictures to claim 
his attention. Enough said. 

Going back to the forlorn Soph. 1 
entered upon my second year at col- 
lege expecting to be rocked gently 
along by my superiors. Having had 
attention once, I expected it forever, 
No one waited to walk through the 
campus with me. No one exclaimed 
affectionately, "Oh, Sophie, do have 
same cakes.” It’s all so discourag- 
ing. I know the other day I heard a 
fellow Soph say, “Let’s go up the walk 
and talk to the freshmen. They're 
so cute and silly.” Then I had a 
thought (yes, I’ve learned a few 
points in that gentle art). Last year 
I was one of those cute, silly things 
called freshmen? and I didn’t miss 
thinking how cute I was, either. 

But, oh, the shudder that passed 
over me when I heard the term ap- 
plied to them — knowing that I hadn’t 
escaped it during the critical period. 
It was at this time, just ten days after 
entering on my sophomore year, that 
I did some tall thinking. Being cod- 
dled. petted, and having a “keen line” 
shot to me wasn’t worth all the at- 
tention in the world when I was noth- 
ing but a silly, cute thing. So here I 
am, very neglected and on my own 
hook — but still something — a Soph. 



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uitg 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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who stand ready and willing at all 
times to aid any student who seeks 
advice. 

The student body impressed me as 
being democratic in every sense of the 
word. Everywhere I was greeted 
with a smile of welcome, and the hand 
of good fellowship was extended. 
Snobbishness was marked by its ab- 
sence. The upper classmen impressed 
and welcomed me with belts wielded 
by their good right arms. 

I found co-eds whose beauty is of a 
type found only in the Magnolia State 
and equalled no other place on earth. 

The college spirit was everywhere in 
evidence, and one gains the impres- 
sion that Millsaps Is the best college 
in the state and that every student is 
loyal to the college. 



Soph: Do you like codfish balls? 

Fresh: Don’t know, I never attend- 

ed one. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




ALABAMA BOUND TODAY 



Majors Tackle Howard 
College 

The wearers of the Purple and White 
leave today for Birmingham where 
they meet the Howard College pig- 
skin handlers on the gridiron tomor- 
row. The team will leave for Birming- 
ham in excellent condition and in high 
spirits. Although they realize that 
Howard is in mid-season, they hope to 
spring a surprise on the Alabama hoys 
and bring home a victory. Coach Free- 
land is not over optimistic about the 
outcome of the tilt with Howard, for he 
realizes that Howard has a strong 
squad of men and will put up a stiff 
fight. However, he firmly believes 
that the Majors will give a good ac- 
count of themselves in tomorrow’s 

game. 

During this past week, the squad has 
shown a great deal of improvement 
since the Prep game. Signal practice 
has been running smoothly, and in 
scrimmages the entire team has been 
tackling and running better interfer- 
ence than ever before, and seem to 
have at last gotten the idea of block- 
ing fairly well. Coach Freeland seems 
well pleased with the way the team is 
taking hold of the new plays, although 
much more is needed in this way. 

The entire student body is behind 
the team this year. We are out to win 
or to make a hard fight. We have 
good coaching; we have good material; 
we have begun to get a good fight- 
ing spirit. With these qualities we 
hope to put out a team that will be 
a credit to Millsaps. 



Success Regrets 

“What is the secret of success? 
asked the Sphinx: 

"Push,” said the button. 

“Never be led,” said the pencil. 

“Take pains,” said the window. 

“Keep cool,” said the ice. 

“Be up to date,” said the Calendar. 

“Never lose your head,” said the 
match. 

“Make light of your troubles,” said 
the fire. 

"Do a driving business,” said the 
hammer. 

“Don’t merely be one of the hands,” 
said the clock. 

"Aspire to greater things,” said the 
nutmeg. 

“Be sharp in all your dealings,” said 
the knife. 

“Find a good thing and stick to it,” 
said the stamp. 

“Do the work you are suited for,” 
said the chimney.— Ex. 



PREPS MEET RAYMOND A. H. S. 

The Preps meet the Hinds County 
Agricultural High School today on the 
Millsaps athletic field. Their clash 
with the College on Monday revealed 
their weaknesses to them and their 
splendid playing inspires them with 
the hope that they will make a most 
excellent showing in football this sea- 
son. Here’s to you, Preps.' We are 
counting on you. 



COLLEGIANS DEFEAT PREPS. 

(Continued from page 1) 
fumbles when touchdowns were in 
sight. The best play was made when 
I Galloway intercepted a forward pass 
and wiggled his way thru the Preps’ 
defense for twenty yards. Neither side 
was able to gain ground, the entire 
quarter being given over to punting 
and fumbling. 

Combs went in for Tate in the 
last half and played good ball at quar- 
terback. Fowler got away for a twen- 
ty yard run in this quarter and McNair 
caught a pass for a fifteen yard gain. 
The Preps kept the ball in the College 
territory during this quarter. 

During the fourth quarter Fowler got 
away around the ends for several 
substantial gains, and Combs made a 
beautiful fifteen yard run around right 
end. Neither side had the necessary 
punch to put the ball over in this 
quarter. When the final whistle blew 
the ball was in midfield. 

Although the game was lacking in 
any real football thrills, the College 
team performed better than had been 
expected. The Collegian eleven was 
not in any form to play a game, but, 
owing to the fact that the Academy in- 
sisted upon playing. Coach Freeland 
allowed the squad to get a good after- 
noon’s work out by locking horns wit! 
"Reddies.” The “Bigun” (Coach Free- 
land’s nick name at Vanderbilt), has 
been having his troubles developing 
: anything that looks like a backfield. 
i but the line can be counted on to hold 
its own with any team in the State. 
Just give the locals another week of 
1 hard practice and watch the results. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCI ATON ELECTS. 

(Continued from page 1) 
then nominated for basket ball man- 
ager, and McEwen was elected. There 
were three nominations for baseball 
manager, C. L. McCormick, Stokes and 
W. W. Combs. Stokes name was with- 
drawn at his request, and C. L. Mc- 
Cormick was elected. There were four 
candidates for the assistant manager- 
ship in track, Collins, Ramsey, Wind- 
ham, and Maske. Collins was elected. 
The office of assistant manager of ten- 
nis had five candidates, Honeycutt, 
Stokes, Donald, W. W. Combs, and B. 
F. Coursey. Coursey was elected, after 
a second primary with Stokes. Next in 
order was the election of a cheer 
leader, and Stokes, who had shown his 
efficiency as a cheer leader last year, 
was unanimously elected. This com- 
pleted the business of the meeting of 
the Athletic Association. 

Then those present gathered at the 
front of the chapel and were led in 
some cheers by the cheer leader. 
Some new cheers were introduced and 
the old ones rehearsed with much 
“pep.” Coach Freeland made a short 
talk in which he discussed the football 
outlook for the season, stating that he 
had some good material which he ex- 
pected to have in proper shape within 
a few weeks. He also stated that the 
team was not ready for the game in 
which they defeated the Academy Mon 
day afternoon, but that they had played 
only after much urging on the part of 
the Academy. There was much en 
thusiasm manifested in the election 
and “pep” meeting. 



MASS ATHLETICS CLASS 
MEETS AND ORGANIZES 



Mass athletics met last Friday after- 
noon on the athletic field, and, 
though not over half the freshmen 
were out, yet the attendance was 
greater than that of last year, owing 
to the large number of sophomores 
taking it. After Coach Freeland had 
made out the roll, the student director. 
Combs, put the men through an hour 
of setting-up exercises, during which 
he had the men perform every possi- 
ble movement of the body except 
shoulder shaking. 

Plans are being made to give those 
taking mass athletics real systematic 
exercise, and not to have them go out 
on the field and w-alk about. Be- 
sides football, basketball, and base- 
ball, Coach Freeland means to have 
the men hurdling, vaulting, jumping 
and engaging in other sports. 

The purpose of mass athletics is 
twofold: first, to teach the student 
how to develop his body, and second, 
to unearth material for the teams. All 
freshmen are required to take mass 
athletics, and one hour's credit is given 
by the faculty to any one who desires 
to take it. 



The Preachers’ League — 

Purpose and Organization 

On Tuesday night last week, the 
Preachers’ League met for its first 
real meeting. The meeting the week 
preceding had been one in which the 
matter of organization and plans had 
been taken up. A. W. Bailey heads 
the organization this year. 

M. L. McCormick conducted the song 
service, after which President Bailey 
introduced the speaker for the even- 
inng. Prof. Bowen, who gave a heart 
to heart talk concerning the character 
of preachers. He was especially fitted 
for this, in that he has had several 
years of experience as a pastor and 
minister. All felt that his exhorta- 
tion Was one that he himself knew 
from experience to be practical. 

At the conclusion, the President ex- 
pressed the appreciation of the 
Leaguers to Prof. Bowen for his words 
and extended an invitation for him to 
be present again. 

The Preachers’ League consists of 
all ministerial students in college, 
whether licensed or not. The fellow- 
ship of all such students will do much 
to confirm and strengthen the preach 
ers of our college. It is the purpose 
of the President to secure, from time to 
time, speakers to deliver words of ex- 
hortation and admonition to the mem- 
bers. Such an organization naturally 
.as in view service to the student body. 
As an organization, it has plans to- 
wards the evangelization of all stu- 
dents who do not know Christ in the 
forgiveness of sins. As individuals, 
the members of the Preachers’ 
League stand ready and eager to 
spend and be spent in service to their 
fellow-students. 



“Fish” Donald says: “When oppor- 

tunity knocks, many a man is out buy 
ing his hops.” 



Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



JACKSON STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

WHEN CLOTHES ARE DIRTY 
RING SEVEN THIRTY 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 
Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DIC E. II. GALLOWAY - 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

’JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

CITY SHOE SHOP 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 

GOOD NEWS FOR 

PIE LOVERS 



At the last regular meeting of the 
Y. W. C. A. it was decided to sell 
sandwiches, cakes, and pies every 
Saturday morning at the Hut. Every- 
thing sold will be in keeping with col- 
lege boys’ and girls’ tastes and pocket- 
books. An appetizing sandwich, a de- 
licious cake, or a home-made pie may 
be purchased for the small sum of ten 
cents. 

The money thus made will go into 
the Y. W. C. A. treasury to be used 
in completing the furnishings of the 
Hut, in giving parties, and sending del- 
egates to the annual Y. W. C. A. Con- 
ference. But after you spend your 
first dime, you will cease to remind 
yourself that you are helping the Y. 
W., and will think only of how that 
apple pie tickles your palate. 

It is to be hoped that Millsaps folks 
will avail themselves of this opportu- 
nity to get good eats “like mother used 
to make.” So bring your dimes to the 
Hut every Saturday morning; you'll 
surely get your money’s worth — and 
then some. 



J. T. COURSEY NEW 

PUBLICITY AGENT 



J. T. Coursey has recently been ap- 
pointed publicity agent for Millsaps 
College. The duty of the publicity 
agent is to furnish reports to the city 
papers of the various activities of 
Millsaps College and her students. 
These reports are to embrace the 
activities of the literary societies, local 
happenings, and athletic news of inter- 
est. 

On account of his experience in ath- 
letics, his good work with the Liter- 
ary Society, and his pleasing person- 
ality, he is exceptionally well qual- 
ified for this place and its responsibil- 
ities. 



The Kappa Delta Sorority enter- 
tained at the sorority room in the 
Administration Building during the 
chapel period on last Saturday. De- 
lightful refreshments were offered to 
*he happy guests. 





THE PRESIDENTS OF 
MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



and Jackson. He has been prominent- 
ly connected with Millsaps College 
ever since it was planned, having 
been a member of the committee to 
whom the charter of Millsaps College 
was granted, and having been a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. In 1889, 
Dr. Watkins was appointed a special 
agent to co-operate with Bishop Gallo- 
way in matters pertaining to the en- 
dowment of the institution. 



M. C. Overall of Houston is among 
the late registrants. 



The Preachers’ League, which for- 
merly met in the afternoon, now meets 
on Tuesday nights. 



The first session of Millsaps College 
opened in 1892 under the presidency 
of Rev. W. B. Murrah, now one of the 
Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Bishop Murrah served 
as president from 1892 to 1910. 

From 1910 to 1912 the college was 
under the presidency of Professor D. 
B. Hull, who Is now president of the 
Mississippi A. & M. College. 

Professor Hull was succeeded in the 
presidency of Millsaps College by Rev. 
A. F. Watkins, D. D., who is serving as 
its president at the present time. 

Dr. Watkins is a member of the 
Mississippi Conference of the M. E. 
Church, South, and has held pastor- 
ates in various parts of Mississippi, 
among them being Natchez, Vicksburg, 



Skirts will be longer this winter. 
What will we do for jokes? 



The faculty held its regular meeting 
on last Tuesday afternoon. A number 
of petitions were passed on. 



I don’t see how they expect a fellow 
to get a bachelor’s degree with all 
these co-eds here. 



Since Dr. Watkins came to Mill- 
saps as president, the student body has 
made a vast increase in size, new de- 
partments of instruction have been 
added, and the number of faculty mem- 
bers increased. 



Messrs. Bufkin and Broom of the 
Alumni Association were at the dor- 
mitory one day last week for dinner. 



Bowen: Where was Abram from? 

Fresh. Chunn : He was from — e 



The college band is yet in the em- 
bryonic stage. In fact, no sounds of 
its approaching outbursts have been 
heard. This organization is of great 
importance, and it should be started 
as soon as possible. 



Bowen: Yes, Ur is correct. 



Moore: Prof. Harrell, may I take 

my lab. yesterday? 



Dr. Sullivan and Prof. Bowen went 
to Memphis on last Monday night, to 
the great sorrow of their classes. 



Prof. White: What is the plural? 

Miss It: The same thing only more 

of it. 



Will someone please try to convince 
Fresh. Fletcher that the holes in the 
fence are knot holes? 



Prof. Harrell: What is the best 

thing about modern inventions? 

Senior : That the electric fan 

doesn’t blow out the electric light. 



Drunk: Get me a drink, I am 

thirsty. 

Friend: Of water? 

Drunk: Naw, I said I was thirsty 

not dirty. 



Sign at Restaurant. 

Don’t divorce your wife because sh< 
can’t cook. Eat here and keep he: 
for a pet. 



Coursey: I am out of luck, I thought 
I was cutting lab. this evening and i: 
comes tomorrow. 



'Did you vote for the honor ?y 



Yes, twice. 



Ducky might have said: A man is 

not a shining example when he is lit. 



When in doubt they once hesitated 
now they toddle. 



A Gateway — Electrical 



Windham says: “The modern girl’s 

hope chest contains an alimony re- 
ceipt.” 



a sJLY a forty -foot gateway bounded Through this gate messages and repre- 
by two brick pilasters and oma- sentatives from a score of other factories 
mental lamps, but it is unlike any other and over fifty branch offices come and 
gateway in the entire world. go every hour— an endless chain of co- 

ordinated activities carrying on and en- 
For back of it is the General Electric i^ging the scope of over a quarter cen- 
Company’s main office building, accom- tury > s work f or t h e betterment of 
modating 2300 employees. And just ma nkin d 

next door is its main laboratory with the what a story ^ gate wou i d te ll, if it 
best equipment for testing, standardiz- could; of the leaders of the electrical fil- 
ing and research at the command of ca- dustr y and of ambassadors from other 
pable engineers. Then down the street a industries and institutions — and from 
mile long — are other buildings where foreign lands. The story would be the 
electrical products are made by the history of electric lighting, electric 
thousands of electrical workers who transportation, electrified industrials 
daily stream through. and electricity in the home. 



It may seem peculiar, but a horse 
can eat best without a bit in his 
mouth. 



A Fresh, went to Hades once. 

A few things to learn; 

Old Satan sent him back again 
He was too green to burn. 



Loyalty kept men at their tasks 
through the dark ages. And prohibi- 
tion has kept many a man at his cask 
in a dark cellar. 



Man is made of dust; along comes 
the water wagon of fate and his name 
is mud. 



Fresh: “Prof. Bowen, are there any 

men angels in heaven?” 

Bowen: “Why, certainly, so.” 

Fresh: “But, I never saw any pic- 

tures of angels with whiskers.” 
Bowen: ■ “No, son, men get in heaven 
by a close shave.” 



She: “Is your girl fond of an argu- 

ment?” 

He: “I say she is. S’he won’t even 

eat anything that agrees with her.” 



General Office 






8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



A Romance of Broadway and Southern Seas. Of a hectic race for pleasure, stilled in the peace of a lonely isle. Of a life unworthy, cleansed by trial and wreck 

that taught a man and worn m how to lice — and loce. 

Friday and Saturday, October 7th and 8th— “The Woman God Changed ” 

With SEENA OWEN AND E. K. LINCOLN A Cosmopolitan Special Production THE MAJESTIC 



ISTBIOWE 

Fri. and Sat.-- Oct, 7-8 

CONSTANCE BINNEY in 

“Such a Little Queen” 

WATCH OUT 

“ Peck’s Bad Boy ” 

PLAYED BY THE KID 

JACKIE COOGAN 

is on the way. See it 
MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

October 10th, 11th 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 

Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 

S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Style* 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 

EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 




D/tMfC 



hero'Colaf 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBER 



FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 



THOUGHTS FROM A 
BOOK-LOVER 

He who wastes time and opportunity 
j is a thief, and anyone squandering 
these things when they belong to him- 
self is a fool. Let the students of 
Millsaps College take thought, as they 
i pass by the gray brick building be- 
tween the dormitories and the admin- 
istration building, if they belong in 
this class. For in that building there 
are books; good books and bad books, 
and some indifferent ones, just as 
there are good people and bad, with 
J some who do not come under either 
class; books with their vices and 
j weaknesses but still with their many 
merits; books from which we can learn 
something. 

The fool says, “I don’t need to read 
books to learn things. I can get more 
profit from studying life and people, 

| and that way learn to meet the world. 
I’ll live in the world of things, and 
j leave those who will to live in the 
| world of books.” Thus sayeth the fool, 
high in his own regard but of small im- 
j portance to the world with which he 
| strives to become acquainted in a few 
j short years. The mind of a Plato can 
| learn the ways of the world from look- 
ing at it; to an ordinary observer, the 
world is a confusion of sights and 
sounds, a Tower of Babel from whose 
roar no word can be distinguished. 

Student of Millsaps, if you do not 
know what the inside of our Library 
looks like, walk in some day and look 
around. Glance through the maga- 
zines, read the headlines in the daily 
paper, and walk back between the 
shelves of books. Surrounded by in- 
animate things, of no use to them- 
selves, will be a creature throbbing 
with life, but (if you are such) of no 
more value than an ingenious and ver- 
satile machine capable of a variety of 
uses. The scheme of creation, if at all 
wise, does not provide for a being 
equipped with intellectual powers, rea- 
soning ability, and a sense (however 
slight) of moral duty, who will serve 
as a mere machine. That human 
mind, a thing possessed by none of the 
lower animals and the exclusive gift 
of man, was furnished for a purpose. 
The development of such a treasure 
is a sacred responsibility; it is the 
duty of every man and every woman 
to make the most of their natural gifts, 
so that they may be useful to their fel- 
low-humans and worthy of themselves. 

Now, in your position within reach 
of hundreds of volumes, reach out 
and take down a book. Close your 
eyes, if you wish, and pick at random; 
a bad book is improving and is better 
than none. Sit down and read fifty 
pages; then, with a fair and open mind, 
think of what you have read. Did you 
learn anything of practical value? 
Was some idea brought home to you 
which would cause you to have a more 
perfect understanding of your relation 
to the things around you? Or, if it 
was a work of fiction, did you enjoy 
the time spent reading it, and were 
your eyes opened to new possibilities 
for men? The chances are that you 
can answer “Yes” to all of these ques- 
tions. Did you never have this expe 
rience? Then try it, and you will find 
a new world, larger than the one yo-> I 
know. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. D O X E Y 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR JOHN C. CARTER 

TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE JEWELER 



Capitol and Mill Sts. The Gift Shop Jackson, Miss. 



* .♦. 

CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




United States, Hinds County and City 


Depository 


Capital paid in 


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Stockholders’ liabilities 


200.000.00 


Surplus earned 


225,000.00 


Undivided profits, net 


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ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 






Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 

at the 

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t 



“BARKER BREAD” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



MEET ME AT THE 

CRESCENT BILLIARD HALL 

Under New Management Next to New Millsaps Bldg. 

O. S. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



ENGRAVED 

WEDDING INVITATIONS— ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CRESTS— CARDS 

MONOGRAMMED STATIONERY FOR LADIES 
BUSINESS STATIONERY 

ONLY ENGRAVING PLANT IN MISSISSIPPI 

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JACKSON, MISS. 





QUAE HAN'T EX HOC COGNOSCES 

VolTxiV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY OCT. 14, 1921 No. 4 



A FOOT BALL KICK 



When is a football kick needed most? 
It is when the team has its back to 
the wall and is endeavoring to hold 
its own with the enemy. It is then 
when the fullback is called back and 
kicks the ball hard. That is going to 
be a hard kick. If it hurts you, ‘hol- 
ler”. The team is against the wall. 
Coach Freeland is giving his level best 
in order to put out a winning team; 
the faculty, alumni, and the student 
body are behind the team from first 
till last. All that the coach, students, 
or anybody else wants is that every 
man give his best. We may not win 
many games, but there is not a man 
in the student body who will not back 
the team till the final whistle of the 
season. This is really our first sea- 
son in football and, as it is, we are 
going to have a rough way, but if we 
do our best who can blame us. Are 
you doing your best, football man? 
Coach Freeland says, “If a man does 
his best he must be in good condition. 
He cannot be in good condition if he 
breaks training.” By breaking train- 
ing we mean smoking, late hours, 
sweets, etc. There are some men on 
the football team that are not keep- 
ing training. Coach Freeland does 
not want any student to be a tattle-tale 
but he wants the student body to form 
such an unpleasant atmosphere that 
a man will be ashamed to break a 
training rule. You know who you are. 
Those that do keep training rules 
surely will have no kick to make be- 
cause of this article, and those that 
are breaking rules will be ashamed to 
kick. Football Man! you are not 
treating your team, college, coach, or 
yourself fairly. It takes a strong char- 
acter to keep fit to fight. Make these 
sacrifices for your alma mater. Be a 
man of Character. 

SCIENTIFIC LECTURER 
OPENS LYCEUM 

Strange Experiments With 
Electricity Puzzle 
Students 



Bang, Pop, Bang, Pop and such like 
sounds came from the stage as the 
Lyceum lecturer kept his audience en- 
raptured with his display of experi- 
ments. 

Louis Williams of the Edwards Ly- 
ceum Bureau gave on Thursday night 
one of the most thrilling, if not en- 
thralling, lectures that has been given 
on the stage of Millsaps College in 
some time. It was supposed to be a 
lecture on electricity and its strange 
qualities, but he gave more than was 
called for by introducing his main 
lecture with a few experiments in 
chemistry. He made the statement 
that most college people had a higher 
intelligence than most audiences, but 
he did not think from the looks of 
the freshmen on the front row that 
they knew much about the subject, 
so he would confine himself to its 
more simple aspects. 

“If you can devise a means of sep- 
(Continued on page 2) 




Trade with the Purple and 
White Advertisers. 



HIGH SCHOOL CONGRESS 
MEETS IN JACKSON 



Y. M. C. A. of State Wel- 
comes Picked Boys of 
Mississippi 

The High School Congress which 
met in Jackson last week was com- 
posed of ninety-one young men, who 
represented eighty-five of our Second- 
ary Schools. These were the picked 
boys of the State, and great things are 
expected from them. 

Mississippi is the first state to have 
a Hi-Y Congress of this sort and is 
showing many new phases of this 
work, which is conducted by Miss Ella 
McIntosh. Mr. B. L. Burford. and their 
assistants. Mississippi is one of the 
leading states in both Boys' and Girls’ 
Hi-Y work. 

The banquet Friday night was a 
great success. The Mississippi Col- 
lege Band furnished the music and the 
Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs, the money 
to pay the expenses of the banquet. 
Mr. J. W. Broom and Dr. L. T. Larsen 
both made splendid addresses, and 
they were well received by all pres- 
ent. 

Talks were given at different meet- 
ings by Dr. Zeno Wall. Dr. Hayes, 
B. L. Burford. Hon. T. Weber Wilson, 
and Herbert L. Crate, all of whom are 
outstanding leaders in the State. The 
boys seemed to enjoy every minute 
of these instructing talks, and will 
be able to go back home and do more 
successful Hi-Y work. 

Several cf the Millsaps College boys 
attended these meetings and met a 
great number of these high school 
boys. They told the boys of the “Ole” 
Millsaps spirit, and how they would 
be welcomed in Millsaps when they 
finish high school. Boys like these in 
this congress will be an asset to any 
college which they may attend. 



MAJORS SWAMPED BY 
HOWARD ELEVEN 

Score 45-0 — Case of Terri ei 
vs. Elephant 

The Millsaps Majors met with dis 
aster in Birmingham last Saturday, 
when they were completely swampec 
by their much heavier opponents, the 
Howard Collegians. The Purple and 
White warriers were not only out 
played by the Birmingham boys but 
were out weighed 45 pounds to the 
man. the How'ard team averaging 19S 
pcunds. Although out played and 
given a severe licking, the Major' 
returned to the campus without any 
serious injuries and with the same 
old spirit of try. try again. Coach 
Freeland is putting the squad through 
regular practice this week in an ef 
for: to put the squad in condition for 
the "Ole Miss" game tomorrow. 

There were no stars in the game 
(Continued on page 6> 

EXTENSION DEPT, WANTS 
HIGH SCHOOL DEBATES 



Millsaps to Lie Host for De- 
haters from Schools 

of Mississippi 
% % 

The Extension Department of Mill 
saps College has sent letters to the 
high schools of the state in an effort 
to stimulate interest in high school 
debating. The plan is xor Millsaps 
to assist the various teams in secur- 
ing data for the debates and then to 
offer entertainment to the teams par- 
ticipating The debates will be held 
at the college about the time of the 
State Teachers’ Meeting. The letter 
which has been sent out is as fol 
lows : 

Will you be interested in sending 
a debating team of two members to 
contest with teams from a selected 
number of accredited high schools in 
a state meet to be held at Millsaps 
this spring about the time of the 
State Teachers’ Meeting? Millsaps is 
prepared to take responsibility for the 
management of the debate, give free 
entertainment for all speakers, and 
furnish an appropriate award to the 
winning team. 

We have been endeavoring for sev- 
eral years to promote debating among 
Mississippi high schools, and are 
anxious to avail ourselves of every 
opportunity to be of service to the 
schools along this line. We are now 
collecting debating materials, informa- 
tion. and references on a number of 
current questions open to debate. 
These materials we are prepared to 
lend to high school students who are 
working up debates. We furnished 
such materials to about ten high 
schools last year. 

In a short time we shall send you 
a Bulletin setting forth our debatin' 
proposition. We may call on you tr 
take the lead in organizing a county 
(Continued on page 2) 



BOBASHELA STAFF 
PLANS GOOD ANNUAL 

'on tracts Already Signed 
and the Work is Under 
Way 

The management of the 1922 Bob- 
hela has been busy ever since its 
tetion last month. As a result, the 
irk on the annual is well under way 
present. Last week a contract was 
gned with the Alabama Engraving 
impany for the engraving work for 
e annual. This company did the 
obashela work last year, and for a 
imber of years before. A contract 
as also signed last week with the 
snson Printing Company of Nash- 
file, Tenn. for the printing of the 
nnual. This concern has printed the 
Jobashela every year for a long time. 
Prof. Sanders, the faculty member in 
charge of the year book, says that the 
:ontract this year is the best that has 
leen secured in several sessions. 

Although none of the pictures have 
been taken yet, the management has 
nade definite plans for the annual 
irograin this year. Much of the ad- 
vertising section has been filled al- 
ready, and this is an important item 
in the work to be done. On Monday 
morning, an appeal was made to the 
students to sign up for the book and 
to make a two dollar deposit to guar- 
antee delivery. About one hundred 
and fifty signed the pledge slips at 
that time. Many other students will, 
>f course, sign up later, when they 
■ealize just what the Bobashela is to 
be. The students in the Millsaps 
Academy have not had opportunity yet 
(Continued on page 3) 

JJNIOfl CLASS 
ELECT OFFICERS 



Windham Again President 
McCall On Honor 
Council 



The Junior Class met in the chapel 
Wednesday morning, Windham presid- 
ing, and elected officers for the year. 
5’ells, McCall and Windham were nom- 
inated for president, and Windham 
was elected. Then Gus Ford was nom- 
inated for vice-president and a motion 
was made to make his election unani- 
mous. This motion carried. Then 
Miss Belle Lindsey was unanimously 
lected secretary and treasurer. Nom- 
nations for representative on the 
-Jonor Council were then in order, and 
McCall and Shearer were nominated. 
McCall was elected. The class then 
adjourned, the purpose of the meeting 
having been accomplished. 

PREPS wmp A. H. S. 



In a hard fought football game on 
the Millsaps Athletic Field last Friday 
the Academy eleven administered a 
’rushing defeat to the famous Hinds 
County Aggies. The score was 27 to 0. 
The Preps showed their customary 
fight and lots of real football ability. 
The visitors were handicapped by the 
oss of their regular quarter early in 
the game. 




2 



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Extension Dept. Wants 

High School Debates 

(Continued from page 1) 

debating league of the larger schools 
in your counts'. 

Let me hear how this strikes you. 
By all means we want your team 
here at the state meet this spring, 
and are speaking early in order to 
assert a claim on you. 

Cordially yours, 

Extension Department of Millsaps 
College. 

This project is another example of 
the good work done by t'ae Extension 
Department, of which Dr. S. G. Noble 
Is the head. Among the other things 
done ret entiv is the plan of offering 
he use of the library to preachers 
crd ethers over the stale. A corres- 
pondence course in certain subjects 
was inaugurated last year, although 
the plan has never been followed up 
very closely. The present plan is a 
gcod one. and offers a great oppor- 
tunity to the debaters of our high 
schools. 



ECHOS FROM 

THE Y. W. C. A. 



Last Thursday at 1 p. m. the Y. W. 
C. A. held its regular weekly meeting, 
vhicli was called to order by the popu- 
lar and able president, Daley Crawford. 
A short business session was held, dur- 
ing which the president announced 
that 40% of the dues this year would 
he sent to the National Board, in or- 
ler that the “Y" may become affiliat- 
d with it and thus put Millsaps on 
he map as far as Y. W. work is con 
:erned. Committees were appointed 
:o clean up the Hut each week and 
nake it as attractive as possible. Each 
Saturday morning the girls ar* going 
:o sell sandwiches, pies, and cakes at 
he Hut. and they hope these refresh- 
nelits will be tempting enough and 
raiatable enough to entice many a 
hungry wanderer to the door. It is 
:he reputation of college folk that 
obey are the proverbial ‘ big eaters” 
if a community, so the girls are confi- 
lent that the Millsaps students will 
live up to their reputations every 
Saturday from 8:30 to the noon hour. 

After the business session, the girls 
enjoyed an interesting and, inspiring 
program, based on that wonderful state 
ment of Charles Kingsley: “Jesus 

Christ is absolutely indispensable to 
my life." Mrs. Sells showed how Jesus 
is indispensable to our lives as the 
Ideal of Duty: Mildred Brashear talk- 
ed cn “Jesus as a Revelation of God”; 
Dorothy Carroll proved that Christ is 
ndispensable to our lives as a Saviour 
from sin; while Lucille Nail conclud 
.d the program by showing how Jesus 
is absolutely necessary as a teacher of 
those principles which make for the 
salvation of society. 

All of the talks were helpful; and, 
as the girls seem to be taking such an 
active interest in Y. W. affairs this 
year, you may be privileged to “watch 
them grow, and glow, and go”! 



SEASHORE CLUB 

WILL MEET 



All the former members of the Sea- 
hore Club and the new men who 
wish to join are asked to meet ~ in 
he chapel at 10:30 Saturday morn 
ng to organize for the year. A presi- 
'ent. vice president, and secretary 
reasurer will be elected and dates set 
for future meetings. 



Scientific Lecturer 

Opens Lyceum 

(Continued from page 1) 

arating the gases in water you will be 
a millionaire”, was one of the strong 
statements Mr. Williams made. He 
said he had been trying it for some 
time but like all the others had fail- 
ed. He. after several experiments, 
gave quite a demonstration of what 
could be done with hydrogen and oxy- 
gen. He put a practical application 
to most of his experiments; in one, 
showing what would happen If you 
went in a room or down a well that 
was filled with carbon dioxide — then 
he showed how to bail the carbon di- 
oxide out of the well. 

He gave a new stunt of blowing 
bubbles that almost completely routed 
his audience. They were afraid to 
tay for fear that he would blow up 
the house. He blew regular soap bub- 
bles, only he filled them with a mix- 
ture of oxygen and hydrogen, which 
made the bubbles rise. Then he placed 
a lighted candle close to them and 
thus exploded them. They made some 
racket, too. 

Then he called for volunteers to 
demonstrate the effect of hydrogen 
on the vocal cords. After several min- 
utes of instruction, he .made Fred Mc- 
Ewcn recite his star speech “Mary had 
a little lamb”, then exhale all the air 
from his lungs and inhale a big 
draught of hydrogen. Then Fred tried 
to recite his little poem and found that 
his vocal cords failed to respond in 
the proper manner. They made a 
sound resembling that of a resined 
string being drawn through a tin can. 

Mr. Williams demonstrated a few 
of the practical uses of electricity 
around the house; giving also a short 
lecture on wireless and its uses. The 
main feature was passing 250,000 volts 
of electricity through McEwen and 
Chatoney and causing the current to 
light a Mazda globe held in their hands. 
Then he also had them hold the trans- 
former, turned the current on, and 
made sparks fly from the knuckles of 
their hands. After this, they felt that 
they were lucky to escape with their 
lives. 

Mr. Williams has been giving lec- 
tures of this kind for twenty-five 
years. Friday night he gave his lec- 
ture at the Methodist Orphanage. 



Y. M. C. A. MEETS 

FRIDAY NIGHT 



The meeting of the Y. M. C. A. open- 
ed with the singing of “True Hearted, 
WTiole Hearted” and “Near the Cross.” 
Then Prof. Bowen led in prayer. 

Pres. Watson then took the floor and 
expressed his regret that the speaker 
who had been announced for the even- 
ng did not come. Watson spoke of 
the good influences of the “Y”, its pur- 
poses, and its hopes, and he exhorted 
those present to line up with it He 
?ncouraged them to refrain from ail 
evil influences that might come and 
to fulfill the purpose of their coming 
to Millsaps. 

The President announced the song 
“He Leadeth Me”. The music of un- 
accompanied male voices singing this 
ong was an inspiration to all present. 
McCall dismissed the meeting with a 
rrayer after which those present re- 
paired to their respective literary soc- 
ieties. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



THE GALLOWAYS HOLD 
REGULAR MEETING 



Good Sample of Oratory 
and Smooth Debating 
Are Heard 



The Galloway Literary Society met 
in regular session last Friday night 
and a tine program was rendered. 
Owing to the absence of Sells, the 
president, Bailey, the vice-president 
took charge. The house was called 
to order by the chairman and Mc- 
Call, the chaplain, led the house in 
prayer. The minutes of the previous 
meeting were read and adopted. Then 
the program for the night was read 
and the declaimer, Mr. Allen, took 
the audience back to the days of the 
Civil War and placed them on the 
great battle field at Gettysburg before 
the great president while he made his 
famous oration. "The Gettysburg Ad 
dress.” The speaker so interested 
the audience in what he was sayin_ 
that they barely noticed him, but 
after he had taken his seat they 
realized that Mr. Allen knew his busi- 
ness. 

The next thing on the program was 
the oration by Mr. Traylor. He gave 
his speech on "Our Opportunities at 
Millsaps”, and, indeed, when he had 
finished, the audience was more deep- 
ly than ever impressed with their 
Alma Mater. It was great to hear 
Traylor, a new man here, give so 
well the facts of our school, and to 
have our freshmen get a glimpse of 
what our college really means. The 
orator could not help making his 
speech a haart-tc-heart talk to the 
students of Millsaps. 

After the oration the debate was 
on. There was an array of good 
speakers on both sides and they made 
it very interesting, although quite 
often too deep for an idle brain tc 
comprehend. The subject that fur 
nished the battle ground was, Resolv 
ed: That the Parliamentary Form of 
Government is More Favorable to 
the Democratic Ideals than the Presi 
dential Form. Mr. Brown, the winner 
of last year’s Freshman Debate, was 
the first speaker on the affirmative, 
and he held high his record he gain 
ed last year. He advanced the argu- 
ment that England, the best example 
fcr fcim, was the mother of our gov 
ernment and all the rest that held 
out for true democracy, and that she 
was so stable that she could live on 
a small island in the sea and rule 
more territory than any nation cn the 
globe. Jones, the first speaker on the 
negative, brought out some smooth 
arguments for his side showing that 
some of the faults of the Parllamen 
tary form of government were detri- 
mental to a democracy. Ware, winner 
of the Commencement debate of la't 
year, arose to defend the affirmative 
and bore heavily on his opponent’s 
argument, at the same time showing 
how “log-rolling” and partial legisla- 
tion were impossible in England. Then 
the last speaker on the negative. Phil 
ips, Brown’s colleague in the Fresh- 
man Debate of last year and also co- 
winner of it, gave some of -his time 
to overthrowing the argument of his 
opponents. This he did in as smooth 
a talk as was ever heard in the soc- 
iety hall. Indeed, it was very interest- 
ing to have all these famous debaters 
meet in a single debate, and many of 
their points have been heard on the 
campus many times since that night. 
The affirmative side won. 

This ended the program for the 



Bobashela Staff 

Plans Good Annual 

(Continued from page 1) 
to contract for annuals, but they will 
have a chance soon. 

•The Bobashela is to sell for four 
dollars this year, whereas it cost each 
student four and a half last session. 
The book is a complete picture of the 
year at Millsaps College. Every im- ! 
portant organization cn the campus 
has its section, and the important 
events are recorded. These things 
are familiar now, as they happen; 
)ut in the years to ccme the memory 
0 ^ them will grow faint, unless the 
?obashela is present to revive it. The 
happy days of college are of enough 
mportance to be properly recorded 
n such a publication as the Bobashela 
to that they will not be forgotten. 

The editor and business mauager 
>re confident that 'the Bobashela r lus 
year will be one of the best ever ; 
aublishtd. The annual is published 
by the Senior Class, and the eu ire 
staff will be drawn from that body. 
”he members of the c'ass form a stock 
ompany which puts up a lepofit to 
guarantee the publication of the book. 



GIRLS, BOB YOUR HAIR 

I have been called upon for an 
estay on some subject of general in- 
erest. Xo special theme has been 
assigned. Being at liberty to select 
he subject nearest my heart, I am 
going to put down my ruminations I 
ipon bobbed hair. It is a tning of 
beauty and a joy until its owner 
’eases to be a flapper. Of course, a 
beautiful bahv doll with bobbed mir 
bins a few years makes a fright, 
which will scare away the jellies who 
formerly came to worship at her 
hrine. Wrinkles and bobbed hair go 
ogether just about as well as a straw j 
bat and a summer shower. A grown- 
up girl with hair cut short is out of 
he race altogether until she lets her 
‘hatching grow out a little. But while 
they last * * * * 

When the fair flappers with cbbre v i- 
ied hair matriculate at ccll?ge, the - 
are received in various ways. They 
ire not unwelcome to the masculine 
■nrt of the student body, and the other 
’o eds are only moderately jealous 
ut one part of the college which is 
lot to be thought of as absolutely 
negligible is the unmarried professor 
no has been crossed in love and 
vbose milk of human kindness has 
oured in his milk-cans. This type o” 
ircfessor is not to be tamed by bobbed 
hair either b'onde or brunette. To 
him bobbed hair is like a red fi g 
‘o a bull, but t his rage must be ex 
iressed in a more quiet way than b;) 
‘be roars which would relieve his 
’eelings. Therefore the offenders re- ! 
eive low grades and sometimes have 
be distinction of hearing allusive re- 
narks made in classroom or chapel [ 
’n the subject of brains, ambition, or | 
anity. 

Hair cut short has certain indisput- 
ble advantages. It does away with 
‘he necessity of hair nets, and elimin- 
ates to a great measure the need for 
(Continued on page 6) 

bight, and the president nske-1 Dr. j 
Key for a word to the society. He 
gave an interesting talk on the bene- 
fits of the literary society, bringing 
in some humor to rest the minds 
weary from the debate. At the end 
'f the talk he reminded the society 
hat It was time to elect our Triangu- 
lar Debaters. After this the house 
attended to a little business, elected 
W. S. Phillips as monthly orator, and 
ajotfrhed to meet the next week. 



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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




Editor-in-chief - -Fred Lotterhos 

Athletic Editor Walter Stokes 

Associate Editor-— E. K. Windham 

Associate Editor Mack Swearingen 

Associate Editor Miss Daley Crawford 

Associate Editor * J. W. Sells 

Associate Editor M. M. McGowan 

REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore 

Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 

Shearer, J. D. Mullen. 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager- 
Circulation Manager 



H. B. Collins 

Geo. Wjfiitts 

G. K. Hebert 



THE EMPORIUM 

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They meet every requirement of qual- 
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workmanship. 



ARE WE DOWN-HEARTED? 



Well, Howard College beat us last week. That was too bad. 
We didn’t want to lose the game; but we did. 

That’s all right, team. We know you fought hard all the way 
through. There are plenty of other chances, and we can plan to turn 
things around next time. 

The student body is not in the least down-hearted as can be | 
readily seen. Everybody is pulling together for success. 

When we meet “'Ole Miss” tomorrow, we can let them know I 
that we are putting everything into the game. The purple team is | 
a fighting machine, and, when it gets beat, somebody knows tha. I 
there has been a battle. 



OUR LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



For a number of years, a favorite topic with some of our stu 
dents has been the dying state of the literary societies. We were 
inclined to begin to believe that there was a large amount of truth 
in this deadly belief, until we noticed the change that has occurre^ 
this year. 

The new student activities fee collected by the college includes 
the fee of the literary society. Consequently, every male stuaen 
in Millsaps College has now paid his literary society dues. Most of 
us are unwilling to pay for a thing and then not get it. Therefore 
most of us are going to take part in the literary society work thi: 
session. 

And yet, there are numbers and numbers of students who ari 
yet unaffiliated with either society. These men are losing a valu 
ble opportunity for training and cultivation in public speaking 
There is no course in oratory offered in our curriculum, but th 
literary society completely fills the need. 

Any- student may- join, and enjoy the same consideration as the 
oldest senior. The meetings are conducted in strict parliamentary 
form. Thus, training in the working of public bodies is a part of 
the benefit offered to the new members. 

The renewed vigor of the Lamar Literary Society- and of th< 
Galloway Literary Society- is a good sign. The only thing to b 
desired is that all the students who are not members shall join one 
or the other at the first opportunity. 



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We note with satisfaction that The Kangaroo (Austin College) 
praises Prof. White and Coach Freeland very- highly in a recent 
issue. 



Don’t forget the old saw: The man worth while is the man with 
a smile. 



The Millsaps Academy deserves a word of praise for the sys- 
tematic way- in which its team piled up scores against the Hind 
County Aggies last week. 



Don’t forget to write that short story for the Purple and White 
contest. You may be the man with the winning idea. Remember 
that the idea and the liveness count rather than the literary per- 
fection. 



Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 




| When you see well dressed men ] 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
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: Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
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NEW FRATS AT VANDY 



The following article is a clipping 
from the Vanderbilt Hustler. 

“Additions to the ranks of the 
Greeks this fall number three. Two 
of these are fraternities, while the 
co-eds have organized a local. 

The Phoenix Club is not entirely 
new to the campus, having been or- 
ganized during the past year. They, 
however, stand upon the beginning 
of a new status. The informal peti- 
tion of this group has geen granted 
by the Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. 
There remains only the formal pas- 
sage of this petition before the con- 
vention of the fraternity in Decem- 
ber, until the Phoenix Club will he 
welcomed to the group of other na- 
tional fraternities now here. 

This fraternity has taken a house 
next to the Deltas. 

We may also welcome the revived 
Pi Kappa Alpha chapter. This chap- 
ter, although for a number of years 
defunct, has been called back and 
promises to be . with us permanently. 
The “Pekes” have taken up their 
abode as the neighbors of the Kappa 
Sigs. 

Not to be outdistanced, the girls 
have also a local to offer. Headed 
by Miss Elise Walker, a sorority local 
has been formed. It is understood 
on good authority that the organiza- 
tion intends to petition Delta Gamma. 
If this be the case we may soon greet 
the wearers of the anchor to the list 
of Hellenes.” 



OZOOOCCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

OPEN FORUM 

OCOODCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOO 

AN UMBRELLA’S SO- 
JOURN IN MILLSAPS 

The other morning, my fair little 
mistress was busily making prepara- 
tions for another hard day’s work. She 
attired herself in her very best array 
and flaunted out, leaving me, a nec- 
essary but neglected umbrella, in my 
solitary rack. As she reached the 
front door, a great big raindrop splat- 
tered down on the side-walk, making 
her very suddenly change her mind 
(as most women have a way of doing) 
changing it to such a degree that she 
hugged me quite, quite closely to her 
heart, and carried me away for my 
first day at Millsaps. 

People frequently labor under the 
false impression that umbrellas 
haven't much sense- and that sometimes 
out of pure contrariness they refuse to 
stay open when they ought. But I’m an 
umbrella, and I’m guessing that I can 
give those critics a piece of my mind. 
Therefore I'm going to record some of 
my observances on that eventful day. 
***** 

The 8:30 bell clanged its grim warn- 
ing to all tardy students. We rushed 
in and secured a seat directly in front 
of the nicest little man! He sat way 
up in the clouds and boasted of a 
most shining countenance; it shown as 
far back from his forehead as 180°. 
Presently he began the recitation; all 
eyes turned toward the rostrum — and 
what do you suppose he said? “He was 
a verray parfit gentil knight”! — then 
I knew that we had harkened back to 
ancient England and were journeying 
to Canterbury with Chaucer and his 
pilgrims. 

That hour having been profitably 
spent, we were in a fitting mood to 

drink in thousands of words which 
flowed constantly from the mouth of 
another man of little height, but great 
latitude I w'as so amused at his funny 
manner — eyes’ winking, mustache twit- 
ching first at one end, then at th° 
other, and nose glasses constantly 
perched on the chubbiest little finger 
you ever saw! I just laughed myself 
to death when he told those college 
people about “dogs going to Europe 
and coming back dogs”; but I didn’t 
3mile when my mistress (poor dear!) 
had forgotten to remember whether 
Louis XVI had 200 horses or 2,000. 

The clouds outside took on such a 
gloomy aspect that I was kept closely 
In hand. I “balked” when chapel time 
came. But how glad I am I went! Dr. 
Mitchell “warbled his roundelay” in 
which everyone joined at frequent in- 
tervals. On the rostrum sat “Prep” 
and “Crayon”, “Red” Harrell, Coach 
Freeland and all the rest — “a most im- 
posing spectacle.” Dr. Watkins made 
a talk that inspired the Co-eds to 
cast sneaking glances toward the 
“Aisles Beyond”, only to win stern 
frowns (?) from the college men. 
Such a pleasant intermission ceased 
all too soon, for I seriously objected 
to serving a term in the vicinity of 
H- S. Professor Sullivan expanded 
and propounded until I gathered that 
T.N.T. is not to be played with by 
little boys and girls. As I came out, 

I saw some fellows who looked like 
“Chemical K. P.’s,” yet who resolved 
into the very dignified assistants that 
inhabit the campus. 

Professor Bowen was lucky enough 
to escape to Memphis, and Dr. Key 
was telling a lot of folks who were 
going to teach Latin how it ought to 
(Continued on page 6) 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association ^ 

Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
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and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



6 




MAJORS MEET “OLE 
MISS” ON GRID FIRST 
TIME IN HISTORY 



The Majors leave for Oxford today 
where they meet the “Ole Miss” grid- 
ers tomorrow afternoon in the second 
clash of the season, for the locals. 
It was doubtful today just who Coach 
Freeland would carry with him, al- 
though most of the men who made 
the Birmingham trip will likely go. 
The team has been working hard this 
past week and will give the Oxford 
bunch a run for their money tomorrow. 

In Barbour and Montgomery the lo- 
cals will meet two of the best broken 
field runners in tbe state. They hope, 
however, to pierce the “Ole Miss” line 
for gains and also to work forward 
passes. It is not known who Coach 
Freeland will use in the backfield 
against the University, but we are 
looking for some changes to take 
place. 

If the Majors can defeat the Uni- 
versit}' or even hold them to a close 
score, they will come back in high 
spirits for the Normal game next Fri- 
day. 



CROSS COUNTRY 
TEAM INVITED 

TO EMORY 



Dr. Key announced at chapel Tues- 
day that Emory University has again 

invited Millsaps College to take part 
! n a cross country run to take place 
in December. Last year, a team rep- 
resenting Millsaps went to Atlanta to 
participate in a similar event. A 
creditable showing was made, al- 
though the team did not win any 
points in the scoring. 

H. B. Collins, track manager this 
year and a member of the team of 
last year, will take the matter in 
charge, and get, our representatives 
ready. Twelve or fifteen men have 
announced that they would try for 
the trip, and as only four can go there 
will probably be some sharp compe- 
tition. 



Majors Swamped By 

Howard Eleven 

(Continued from page 1) 
for the Majors, although Stovall fea- 
tured the game by running eighty 
yards after intercepting a forward 
pass. He was downed by a Howard 
back on the Howard five yard line. 
Millsaps fought hard to put the ball 
over, but the heavy Howard line held 
them for downs. Fowler got away 
'or several pretty broken field runs 
and Campbell and McNair each 
caught a pass. It was simply a case 
of a bull terrier trying to fight an 
elephant. 

Although on the defensive during 
the entire game, the Purple and 
White line held the Alabama boys 
during the first quarter for a nothing 
to nothing score. During the second 
quarter, however, the strain began 
to tell and Howard crossed our goal 
line twice. The third quarter saw the 
downfall of the locals, for Howard 
j piled up twenty one points. Then in 
the last quarter the Alabamians ad- 
I -led two more touch downs to their 
i list. 

On the face of this defeat the out- 
look doesn’t seem so very promis- 
ing for a successful team this year 
But when you take into consideration 
that we were not prepared for a 
game and that we were greatly out 
weighed, and up against a team of 
experienced ball players, the outlook 
j brightens up a great deal. By tbe 
time play Mias Normal during 

the State Fair, we are going to have 
a fast, hard working team that will 
begin to show up some real football. 

The following men made the trip: 
Windham (Capt.l, Cull ;y. Scott, King 
Peeves. Campbell. McNair. Combs 
Tate, C. Galloway', King. Mussilwhite. 
Lilly. D ovall, Fowler and McEwen. 



GIRLS GET CHANCE 

TO PING PONG 



The tennis court for girls has been 
put into good shape this week, and 
everything is ready for the co-eds to 
prepare themselves to meet some of 
the lady champions. Year before last, 
tennis was very popular with the girls 
of Millsaps, but last year other in- 
terests supplanted this sport. 

Under the direction of Manager 
Coursey, a number of boys helped to 
repair the girl’s court, and now there 
is no reason why tennis should not re- 
gain its position of honor. 



SEASON TICKETS FOR 

GAMES ON SALE 

The Athletic Association finds it 
necessary to raise additional funds 
this year, and so a plan has bean 
adopted by which season tickets will 
be sold to th? friends, alumni, and 
patrons of the college. Many of tbe 
alumni are willing to buy season tick 
ets to the games, because it will 
really be cheaper for them than pay- 
ing admission at the gate. 

A committee was selected by the 
Association for the purpose of put- 
ting these tickets on sale, and that 
committee is busy at present In get- 
ting the ticke's into the hands of a.l 
'nterested parties. Every student who 
was not required to pay an athletic 
fee and every loyal alumnus should 
buy a season ticket. 



“Do you believe in love at first 
sight?” 

“Well I’d hate to believe that some 
people married after a second look.” 
—Ex. 

“I told her that I was going to kiss 
her once for every step of the way 
home.” 

“And what did she do?” 

“She went up stairs and put on a 
hobble skirt.” — Ex. 



Continued from page 3. 
brushing. But while a few rapid 
flourishes of a comb will suffice to 
straighten out the kinks, more time 
than just that is required for the 
care of decapitated hair. Observe the 
motions of any wearer: every few 

minutes she puts both hands up be- 
hind her neck and makes a few little 
qui' k upward motions with her hands 
against the ends of her hair, this with 
the purpose of fluffing it up. But they 
never get it quite fluffy enough to’ 
suit them. 



THE LAMARS HAVE 
UNUSUAL MEETING 

Initiate a Galloway — Debate 
Strange Question 

The Lamar Literary Society met 
in the Lamar Hall last Friday for the 
third meeting of the year. Although 
it met at the usual time in the usual 
place with the usual crowd, it turned 
out to be a very unusual meeting. 

The first victory cf the annual mem- 
bership conflict between the Lamar 
and Gallo vay Societies was claimed 
bv the Lamars, when a Galloway was 
duly initiated into the secrets of the 
Lamar society, said Galloway being 
Walter Galloway of McComb City. He 
was not so much a loss to the Gallo- 
ways as he was a gain to the Lamars. 

Due to various reasons, (including 
unpreparedness and absence) the ora 
tor and tte declaimer did not per- 
form. Though this broke up the regu- 
lar program, it was one of the things 
that befell to make it the unusual 
meeting. 

When the roll was called for the 
debaters, there was another hitch in 
the program. Ford md Sheerer an 
swered for the affirmative, but only 
Applewhite answered for the nega 
tive. Lotterhos was appointed to 
‘ake the absentee’s place on the nega 
live side. 

The subject for dis ussicn by the e 
embryonic politicians was: 

Resolved. That the disarmament* 
conference should not have been call 
ed. 

Ford opened the guns for the gffir 
mative by declaring that heretofo~e no 
good had come from such conferen- 
ces: therefore they must be harmful. 

Applewhite in defending the nega 
ive brought forth conclusive proof 
and also statistics to back his state 
■nents. Shearer next proved conclu- 
Tvely that the United States should 
not disarm. Lo terhos noxt«'a*”e fo _ 
vard with a resume of his co lea ur’r 
beech and a rebutia’ cf hi oepa 
ctent’s speeches. 

The judges decided the deb ta in 
favor of the regativ? Vy the smal’ 
majority of one vote, there beiug only 
Ihree judges. 

During r 11 this heavy disci’S-’on the 
new members seemed sor. ev- hat dis 
concerted and worried ’’ he- acted 
and looked as if some awful c’Dmit 
vas about to be’all th“ i. T’”> eau-m 
f or this uneasiness was , oon learned 

President Stokes announced th' 
names of ti e i-rproirut: defer terc 

They were: T'lmlin a-i di n V - 

mative. and Carr and Sharbcroveh 
negative. A sigh of rclie” ca — e from 
‘he unchosen others 

The apple of discord was thrown 
’nto the midst of the i ucromutu de 
haters when President Stokes announ- 
ced the subject. After seeiev and 
hearing the turmoil pud confusion 
caused by this terribl- 1 t’’-' ”h tim' 
ly subject we deemed it i-’preper and 
unwise to publish it. Put we will 
say this much, that, should, by any 
possible chance the coeducational 
curiosity be aroused. W. E. Stokes 
will furnish any information wanted 
on the subject. 



OIL Cuv\ 



Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



JACKSON STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

WHEN CLOTHES ARE DIRTY 
RING SEVEN THIRTY 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 
Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

CITY SIIOK SHOI* 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

m. .1. Walthall, i*r«p. 

Continued from page 5. 

be dun. 1 , so my impressions of them 
were too vague to be true ones. 

The spirit up there is so fine and 
uch a fri ndly, int rested atmosphere 
pervad s th 1 campus that me thought 
would pr f r day of school routi le 
in Millsaps to all the harrowing ex- 
periences of an umb ella that has b-en 
lugged around all day, become a nuis- 
ance, and been til own into th : corn r 
at night. ***** 

I shall tell my mist ess of what ' 
have done an I if she reproves me f r 
a poor memo y or a lack of fo~e- 
fhought I hall rsn-im-nd h : f r 

having purchased : n umbrella with an 
ivory head! 



STJ 7P* c aters JAUNT 

^0 observatory 



The cl ss in astronomy made its 
irst pilgrimage to the observatory 
"c- day ni -It. The experience was 
eew to most of t u e members, and they 
earned several things about the moon 
rd stars. Prof Harrell was in charge 
cl minted out many things of in- 
erest to the class. 

The Observatory is open to the gen 
ual public at eight o’clock on Mon- 
lay nights, and several visitors were 
there to look through the giant tele- 
scope on the night in question. Prof. 
Harrell announced that there will be 
an ealipse cf the moon on the night 
of Sunday, the sixteenth of Octobe a. 
This announcement was, of caursa, of 
treat interest to the class. 

The James Observatory contains one 
of the two real telescopes in the state, 
and is therefore a point of special 
interest to people who know anything 
about astronomy. 



Heard in Freshman Bible. 

"How far are you in Biblical litera- 
ture?” 

“AA’e’re in the middle of original 
sin.” 

“Huh, that’s nothing, we are past 
redemption.” 




I never knew that I had such a big 
mouth, but the dentist says that he 
could put a bridge in it. 



Visitor: Well, I must be off. 

Jones: So I have noticed for a long 
time. 

We wish someone would compile an 
index to. a dictionary. 



Red: Did you ever shave a monkey. 

Dad: No, but get in the chair and I 
will try. 

Bill: I have a brother who is crazy; 
he goes around telling every body that 
he is President Harding and that I 
am General Pershing. 

Mike: Sure he is crazy. 

Bill: 0£ course he i3, I am President 
Harding and he is General Pershing. 



Broke: I have got to get me an- 
other overcoat. 

Broker: Which restaurant do you 
get yours at? 



Prof. Harrell : Ivory is the most elas- 
tic thing known. 

Blount: That’s why they make Ivory 
Garters then, is it? 

Co-ed: What do you think I am? 
Edward: I don’t know, I am not 
good at puzzles. 



Dr. Noble (in economics class): 
What is the most unsettled class of 
people? 

Fish: Traveling men. 



“Help”! she cried, as the salt water 
in her tub began to get fresh. 



Fresh: Was George Washington 

honest? 

Soph : I don’t know, they always 
close the banks on his birthday. 



Ducky might have said: Blessed be 
he who expecteth nothing, for he will 
not be disappointed. 



Junior (walking up to freshman): 
Honeycutt .is my name. 

Freshman: Shanks is mine. I’m a 

freshman too. 



Scott (at football practice) : Hey, 
somebody sit on that Davenport there. 



Red Harrell in astronomy class: 
Where is the vernal equinox today? 

Stokes: Let me look on the globe 
and I’ll tell you. 

Red: Look in your own globe. 



Chancellor says that the girls "tear 
up more paper in chapel than the boys 
do. 



She: The man who marries me 

must be brave and daring. 

He: Yes, he certainly must. 



Red Carr says, “The line of least 
resistance is sometimes the waist 
line.” 



“Music is the sunshine of the soul;” 
jazz, the moonshine. 



Fresh: What is Galloway’s credit 
rating? 

Mgr. College Store: So low he can’t 
even get a battery charged. 



7 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



A giil should not kick when a fel- 
low lays his heart at her feet — Ask 
Stokes, he knows. 



"There's the guy I’m laying for,” 
said the hen as the farmer crossed 
th i farm yard. 



J. CT-- r- 




Freshman at the Lyceum Course: 
Shall we all squeeze in the front seat? 

Co-ed: John! Can't you at least wait 
.ill we get home? 



The young man led for a heart, 

The maid for a diamond played, 
The old man came down with a club. 
And the sexton used a spade. 



“At your service,” said the burglar, 
as he jimmied the family sideboard. 



Prof. White: What is there to sub- 
tantiate the opinion that Shakespeare 
was a prophet? 

Gus Ford: He was foretelling the 
era of home-brew when he wrote the 
ecipe for Witches’ Broth in “Mac- 
beth.” 



Some Heat 

Fresh Brown : Boys, it was so hot out 
in Arkansas this summer that I saw 
a hound dog chasing a jack rabbit and 
they were both walking. 

Fresh Moss: Shucks, it was so hot in 
Atlanta this summer we had to feed 
our hens cracked ice to keep them 
from laying hard-boiled eggs. — Ex. 



CHOICES. 



1 like a girl with dark bobbed hair, 
Your coat buttons then will not catch 
there ; 

A hair nejt she does not wear 
As those darn things are sure to tear. 

I like a girl with lots of sense; 

This is more than a coincidence, 

A miracle I would say 
’Cause pretty girls don’t need sense 
today. 

The show girls appeal to me, 

The reason you can surely see; 

You wonder why the men are wild. 
Well anyway they wear a smile. 

Of all the girls I’ve had and held 
I know of none I love so well 
As the one who has a big six car. 

It takes that to be popular. 



THE FLAPPER’S SONG 



When mother was a little girl, 

Yes things were different tlmn. 
For girlies in those days you know 
Never went with men. 



Prohibition 

A Freshman from Alabama tells one 
of the professors it has been so dry in 
his state that there are bullfrogs down 
there eight years old who haven’t 
learned to swim. — Ex. 



We’ll Say So 

M.: Red tried to put his arm around 
me three times last night. 

F.: Some arm!' 

—Ex. 



Retort Courteous 

What would you do if you were in 
my shoes? 

Get ’em shined. That’s what I’d do. 
—Ex. 



Very Good Reason 

“This isn't a very good picture of 
your little baby brother, is it?” said 
the visitor. 

“No, ma’am,” replied little five-year- 
old Alice. “But, then, he ain’t a very 
good baby.” — Ex. 



Should He 

If a body meet a toddy, 

And a body’s dry, 

Should a toddy treat a body 
Cornin’ through the rye? 

—Ex. 



Generous Boy. 

f • 

Dear Editor: After taking my best 

girl to dinner, theatre, supper and a 
taxi home, should I kiss her good- 
night? 

Answer: No, you did enough for 

her. 



Seven Wonders of the World 

I wonder who — 

I wonder what — 

I wonder why — 

I wonder where — 

I wonder when — 

I wonder how — 

7 wonder which Ex. 



And when a boy would call on them 
They never kissed at all. 

The lights were never dim and low 
Cause dad stayed in the hall. 

Their beaus they always left at^ten 
And called just once a week. 

If “jellies” now had this to do 

Oh wouldn’t it make you weep? 

• 

When mother was a little girl 
The girls wore lots of clothes. 

But in this present day of ours 
We’ve all disposed of those. 

We wear our hose of purest silk 
And dresses to bur knees. 

And yes the waists that now we sport 
Would make a bull dog sneeze 

But we should worry little “flap” 
We’U go on as we will. 

For as they loved in days of yore 
The men will love us still. 

— D. F. M. 



THOSE GOOD DAYS 



It used to be when fir3t I came 
To Millsaps on the hill, 

That life was free and calm and gay; 
Of joy we had our fill. 

In those good days we know right well 
We had of cuts full three. 

But now, oh woe! I hate to tell 
What they have said to we. 

Those cuts have gone up in the air, 
Of them we’ll see no more. 

The question is, now is it fair. 

Or was it fair before? 

“Be down to breakfast every morn” 
This is their latest rule. 

I cannot gues3 what next they’ll do 
To change up this old school. 

But as for me the best I’ll make 
Of life as it I see. 

For college profs are hard old eggs, 
And do as darn they please. 

— D. F. M. 



THE WOODLAND CALL. 



In the silence of the woodland ere the 
sun has risen high. 

And Nature lies all glorified beneath a ( 
cloudless sky, 

I like to feel beneath my feet the moist 
and springy ground, 

And breathe the fragrance of the 
woods, and catch the slightest 
sound. 

My soul seems then to soar aloft; I 
feel myself to be 

In tune with God's great universe — in 
perfect harmony. 

There’s something kindred in each 
note the feathered songster 
sings. 



And my soul is deeply thankful for the 
comfort that it brings. 

Just to stretch myself beneath the 
shade of some old moss-hung 
oak; 

And revel in the solitude and watch 
the woodland folk. 

To lay behind me for a while all 
thoughts of care and pain 
And enjoy the healthful splendor, of 
Nature’s great domain. 

Where human footsteps seldom pass 
to mar the natural charm 
And primal forces work God’s plan — a 
still but potent psalm. 



AND THAT SOMEHOW JUST TAKES 
WITH ME 



He’s awful tall and awful slim, 

But still he has a way with him. 

That seems somehow to take with me. 

He isn’t handsome, not a bit. 

But still there’s something ‘bout him 
yet 

That seems somehow to take with me. 

He’s not a “Jelly-Bean”, I know 
And people think him awful slow, 

But still somehow he takes with me. > 

He doesn’t go a speedy gait, 

But dear, -his loving is so sweet! 

That he somehow just takes with me. ' 
-D. F. 11. 



Dr. Sullivan has given the orchestra 
a start this year by taking the initia- 
tive in securing a leader and getting 
the musical members of the student — 
body together. They met at the Doc- 
tor’s house Monday night for the first 
session.* Many students have offered 
for the orchestra, and it should be 
easy to find enough members in the 
crowd. The leader will probably be 
Prof. Pitard, a prominent musician of 
Jackson. Prof. Pitard was the leader 
of the band which Millsaps organized 
in 1918 and which was broken up 
just when it was beginning to work 
well together. 

There is no one thing which the 
college needs more than a good live 
musical organization of some kind, 
either a band or an orchestra. The 
success of Dr, Sullivan’s plans will be 
a great asset for Millsaps. 



Sure Trick. 

Dear Editor: I would like to be an 
orator. What is the best way to 
acquire a flow of language? 

Answer: Well, you might try tread, 
ing on a tack in your bare feet. 



ORCHESTRA SEEMS 

TO BE REALITY 



$ 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Best Place to Spend that 
Idle Hour 



The MAJESTIC THEATRE 



Mississippi’s Largest and 
Most Comfortable Theatre 



Friday and Saturday, October 14-15 

Norma Talmadge in 
“THE SIGN ON THE DOOR’’ 

from Channing Pollocks famous play 

The Majestic Orchestra 



Monday and Tuesday, October 17-18 
“BURIED TREASURE” 

A story of today with all the thrills of the 
old-time adventure 

PRICES TO ABOVE PROGRAMS 10c AND 25c 



Wednesday and Thursday, October 19-20 

Thomas Meighan in 
"THE CONQUEST OF CANAAN” 

from the novel by Booth Tarkington 

5 Shows Daily — 2 to 11 P. M. 



ISTRIONE 



Monday and Tuesday, October 17-18 
Elsie Ferguson In 

“SACRED and PROFANE LOVE” 
(A Paramount Special) 



Wednesday & Thursday, Oct. 19-20 
Douglas McLean in 
“PASSING THROUGH” 



Friday and Saturday, Oct. 21-22 
TOM MIX 
in 

“THE BIG TOWN ROUND-UP” 



ORCHESTRA 



SHOWS DAILY 



Clip this Out — You'll Need it— 



Galloways Elect Triangular 
Debaters 






At a special meeting on Monday 
morning, the Galloway Literary Soc- 
iety elected its triangular debaters 
for this year. W. S. Phillips was elect- 
ed to debate against Mississippi Col- 
lege at Millsaps; while J. W. Sells 
was chosen to meet A. & M. debaters 
at Starkville. These men will have as 
colleagues the debaters to be elected 
from the Lamar Literary Society. 

Both of these men are experienced 
debaters, so that Millsaps College will 
stand a good chance for success in 
the triangular debate this year. Last 
year Millsaps was the winner, its 
teams defeating those of Mississippi 
College and A. & M. 



Glee Club Meets for Regular 
Practice 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

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T. B. D O X E Y 

YOUR PATRONAGE "EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYR1CII & CO. 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR JOHN C. GARTER 

TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE JEWELER 

Capitol and Mill Sts. The Gift shop Jackson, miss. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



On Monday night at seven-thirty, 

| the Glee Club met for its regular re- 
! hearsal. The club has an excellent 
{ prospect for this session, because a 
| very large number of candidates are j 
trying for places on the aggregation, i 
Dr. Mitchell is in charge, and he has 
had plenty of experience in glee club 
training. 

Many good voices in addition to 
those already on the club from pre- 
vious years have been discovered. 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 



Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



Bill Combs had as a week end guest 
last week his brother, John Combs, 
who was on his way to A. & M. 



J. W. Shanks of Sumrall is a new 
student. 



C. G. Cook visited friends in Crystal 
Springs last Sunday. 



J. P. Jones went to Brandon last 
Sunday to visit his family there. 



I. E. Williams spent the week end 
with his brother in an interesting 
:amp meeting at Wortham. Miss. 



R. T. Hollingsworth has returned 
from a visit to Dover. 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



DRM/C 

hero-Cola 



E. 0. Baird spent last week end at 
Brookhaven. 



T. J. Ray was absent from school 
last Wednesday and Thursday on ac- 
count of sickness. 




Miss Mary Ella Evans went to Can- 
ton recently to be present at the 
wedding of her brother. 



gSBBBBili 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBER 



W. E. McQuaig, a student here in 
1919-20, has returned to the college 
to continue his studies. 



Fatty Noblin, who was a student 
of Millsaps part of last year and lives 
at Forest, visited his friends on the 
campus Tuesday. 



FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 



W. A. Scott, Jr„ has returned to 
Jackson after a visit to Vanderbilt and 
Ole Miss, at both of which schools 
he was unable to secure accommo- 
dations, on account of crowded con- 
ditions. We hope that Scott will cast 
in his lot with Millsaps again this 
year. 



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Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCT. 21, 1921 No. 5 



MILLSAPS ACADEMY TO 
BE IN SOUTHERN ASS'N 



Graduates May Now Enter 
All Colleges Unques- 
tioned 



The Millsaps Academy began last 
week its new schedule which was 
necessarily adopted In order to place 
the school on the list of accredited 
ichoola of this state. This important 
step has been long neglected, as the 
Academy has been deserving of the 
rank since its founding; but no action 
had been taken to have its name en- 
tered upon the lists. The necessary 
changes in curriculum were very 
slight. However, it became necessary 
to extend classes until 3 o’clock in the 
afternoon. 

Of far greater importance was an 
additional advantage for which the 
slight change of curriculum placed the 
Academy directly in line. This was 
its admission as a secondary school to 
the Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools of the Southern 
States. 

Last week Profs. Ferguson and 
Dearman of the Academy had several 
interviews with Mr. H. M. Ivy, Direc- 
tor of State Accredited High Schools 
and also a representative of secondary 
schools in the Association. Air. Ivy 
indicated the fact that the same 
changes necessary for securing state 
affiliation, with the other excelling 
qualities of the Academy, would also 
place it on the lists of the Southern 
Association. The very great advan- 
tages of such classification were quick- 
ly seen, and the necessary changes 
of schedule and curriculum were 
quickly worked out and put into effect. 

After the Academy secures such 
classification, its graduates will be 
able to enter any college Or university 
in the country, not excepting th^ 
greater universities of the North and 
East. Mr. Ivy showed reports of the 
Association’s Commission on Accredit- 
ed Schools which contained testimon- 
ials of practically all the large uni- 
versities to the effect that graduates 
from the Association’s secondary 
schools will be admitted unquestioned. 

There are thirteen high schools and 
academies in this state which now en- 
joy this distinction. 



Kit Kat Club Holds First 
Meeting 

The local chapter of the Sigma 
Upsilon literary fraternity, the Kit 
Kat Club, met on Tuesday of last 
week for the first meeting of the 
year. The organization met at the 
Kappa Alpha house, where it was en- 
tertained by F: J. Lotterhos. 

H. B. Collins, M. M. McGowan, W. E. 
Stokes, and E. K. Windham were 
initiated into the club at this meeting. 
Plans for the year’s work were dis- 
cussed, and a short story was read 
and criticized. 



Fresh — (Writing a theme) : “Say, 

does a prune grow on a tree?” 

Soph — (Room-Mate) : “Nope, it 

grows on a vine, like a banana.” 



GALLOWAYS HAVE G. MONHOE PATCH 
HEATED DISCUSSIONS IS NEW PROEESSOR 



New Phase of Cut System 
Discussed 



Florida Man to Have Over- 
flow Classes in Chem- 
istry and Math. 



The meeting opened with the usual 
introductory exercises presided over 
by the president. Then an old Gallo- 
wayan. Prof. Bowen, was called on to 
speak of his former days as a member 
He told, among other things, now that 
when he went to Emory, some of the 
boys would get sore when he told 
how much “pep” there had been in 
his society at Millsaps. He also cau- 
tioned the men that they must look 
to their laurels in debating and the 
like on account of the newly enfran- 
chised women. 

The regular program oe;an ith 
a declamation, “Love of Country,” by 
J. L. S’kinner. J. S. Warren followed 
with an interesting oration on "Char- 
acter”. Then four promising new 
members, I. E. Williams and J. F. 
Waites against F L. Martin and Quin- 
ey McCormick, discussed whether or 
not the president should be elected 
by direct vote of the people. It was 
decided that we should change our 
(Continued on page 2) 

LAMARS DISCUSS 
KU KLUX ALAN 



Debaters for Inter-Colleg- 
iate Debates Selected 



As a new addition to her faculty 
Millsaps is glad to have Mr. G. Monroe 
Patch, B. S., M. S., from John B. Stet- 
son University in DeLand, Florida. 
Mr. Patch comes to us with the high- 
est recommendations and will devote 
his time to classes in mathematics and 
chemistry. 

•This new assistant professor, who 
will no doubt soon be irreverently 
referred to as “Dan", is a young man 
in his early twenties. Besides taking 
two degrees at his Alma Mater, he 
was also an assistant in the chemistry 
department there for one year. John 
B. Stetson University has selected 
him as its candidate for the Rhodes 
Scholarship in Florida, and with his 
remarkable grades and other outstand- 
! ing records his chances for election 
are excellent. 

Air. Patch is recommended to us 
both for his ability and his stalwart 
t Christian character. We predict for 
him success, and we hope that his 
work here will be a pleasure to him. 

GEOLOGIST ENCOUNTERS 
A PLIOCENE HORSE 

Strange Adventures Come 
to Groot’s Class on 
Recent Trip 



Last Friday night the Lamar Liter- 
ary Society held its regular weekly 
meeting with a fair attendance. The 
absence of the football team, however, 
thinned the ranks of the faithful La- 
mars. The feature of the evening was 
an oration by Mack Swearingen. In 
a short, but to-the-point address he 
spoke of the spirit of Alillsaps when 
under the disadvantage of defeat on 
the athletic field. He also touched 
upon our relations with Mississippi 
College — a rather delicate problem, but 
one which is being solved by the fair- 
ness and sensibility of the student 
bodies of both institutions. 

The debate was upon a very live 
subject, and one which is still grow- 
ing — the Ku Klux Klan. The question 
was. Resolved: That the Ku Klux Klan 
should be abolished. The affirmative 
was upheld by H. B. Collins and H. C. 
Young; the negative, by Carter O’Fer- 
ral and Austin Joyner. The gentle- 
men of the affirmative brought out the 
utter uselessness of such an organi- 
zation and the evils which are actu- 
ally and necessarily to come with a 
secret society of such character. The 
defense based their arguments large- 
ly upon the source from which the 
opposition got their arguments; they 
said that the reports of the New 
York World were absolutely unreli- 
able and prejudiced, therefore no fit 
evidence. Then they proved from the 
World’s expose that the Klan is not 
so bad as it is painted. The judges, 
(Continued on page 3) 



Six o’clock and all is well. Not a 
sound can be heard save the faintly 
audible snores of the young Geologist. 
Presently the air is pierced with the 
gong of one of those $1.79 sunrise 
specials. He ceases sawing wood and 
turns over muttering “first bell” and 
then falls back to the monotonous 
snoring. But hold. Sunrise repeats, 
be is fully awake this time, and be- 
gins to realize that he is only half 
dressed and the class leaves the sta- 
tion at 6:40 o’clock in search of elusive 
contours. 

Thanks to “Sunrise Special” he 
makes the train on time. He finds 
all the class aboard and conversing 
in quite a scientific manner. One 
hears such terms as “Cretacious, Co- 
manchean, Pterodactyl" and the young 
Geologist wonders if he hasn’t fallen 
into a school of Scandinavian Bolshe- 
vists. Their vocabulary being limited 
in this direction they soon settle down 
to more pleasant topics or at least 
topics two or three million years 
more modern. Soon the city of Flora 
is announced and the class betake 
themselves to terra firma once again. 

Groot is at once lost among the 
skyscrapers hunting transportation to 
the scene of our forefathers’ antede- 
luvian peach orchard. The young Geo- 
logist finds that he and his .compan- 
ions have a few minutes in which to 
squander a little change in the great 
metropolis. He saunters over to the 
drug store to purchase a smoke. He 
recognizes none of the brands but 
(Continued on page 2) 



THAT "OLE MISS" GAME 



A Defeat is Now a Victory 

Saturday October 15th the wearers 
of the Purple and White were defeat- 
ed at Oxford by the team representing 
“Ole Miss”, score 49 to 0. No not 
swamped; because there was not a 
minute during the game that the P 
& W lightweights were not fighting 
“with a blooming stout heart”, and 
that “Ole Miss” was not worried. 

October 15th_can always be remem- 
bered with pride, by supporters of 
Purple and White; for the Team made 
a good CLEAN fight. 

The line-up follows: 

Left End — Brooks. 

Left Tackle — Stovall. 

Left Guard — Honeycutt. 

Center — Windham (Capt.). 

Right Guard — Musselwhite. 

Right Tackle. — McEwen. 

Right End — Campbell. 

Quarter Back — Culley. 

Left Half — Fowler. 

Right Half — Galloway. 

Full back — Reeves. 

P & W Substitutions: first quarter — 
Combs for Culley; third quarter — Mc- 
Nair for Brooks; fourth quarter — Stott 
for Honeycutt, Carr for Reeves. 

“Ole Miss” scored the first touch- 
down in the first 5 minutes of play, 
by a series of line bucks. Two min- 
utes later Culley was injured, Combs 
taking his place. “Ole Miss" failed 
to score again in this quarter. 

In the second quarter, P & W cut 
loose a barrage of forward passes 
and fake plays, which had the “Ole 
Miss” team looking like a bunch of 
school boys; only the lucky intercep- 
tion of a forward pass by an “Ole 
Aliss” player kept Millsaps from scor- 
ing in this quarter. “Ole Miss” start- 
ed using her reserves, and scored an- 
other touchdown. 

The third quarter netted “Ole Miss” 
3 more touchdowns; and the fourth, 
2 more. In this last half it was sim- 
ply a case of using new and untired 
weight on the lighter, Millsaps line. 

“Ole Miss” was penalized several 
times for fouling; one of their play- 
ers was disqualified for kicking an 
opponent who was down. 

Galloway did excellent passing; 10 
forward passes being completed, Fow- 
ler receiving 4, Campbell 2, Combs 2, 
Reeves 1, and Brooks 1. 

“Ole Aliss” kicked all seven goals. 



$100 REWARD— LOST, 
STRAYED OR STOLEN 



A man about the size of a woman; 
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shoes on. Pink eyes and sunset-col- 
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former cut darker. He wore a ham- 
burger overcoat with a hot-dog lining 
and had an empty sack on his back 
containing a barrel of skylights and 
one dozen assorted railroad tunnels. 
When last seen he was following a 
crowd of Millsaps College students 
who were headed for the football game 
between the Majors and the team from 
Alississippi Normal College. Be on 
hand and try to win the reward! 



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Galloways Have Heated 
Discussion 

(Continued from page 1) 
present system and elect our president 
by popular ballot. 

By this time the air had become 
laden with heat and the society was 
well prepared to enter into the dis- 
cussion: Resolved, That the president 
of Millsaps College should be forced 
to attend college with only one cut 
per term even as the students. This 
was done from a purely impersonal 
standpoint with the office of president 
and not any particular person in 
view. However, our present one was 
taken as a model one. The affirma- 
tive held that the president should 
stay here and give the student body 
his personal attention, and he was 
likened unto a pilot of a ship who 
must always be on duty. “We need 
his kindly beaming countenance to 
inspire us daily to higher things * * 
etc.’’ The negative first asked the 
question "If the president stayed here, 
what would he do?” Then they argu- 
ed that if he was penalized as the 
student body is, he would soon get 
shipped. They emphasized his great 
influence in helping to gain the goal of 
the "Four Hundred Club.” Also if 
this officer be constantly absent, there 
will be no one to intrude on “mine 
and Ducky’s” time. 

The decision was made in favor of 
the affirmative by the society as a 
whole. The decision of the debate 
having been for the affirmative, the 
following committee was appointed to 
enforce it: M. H. McCall, Chairman; 
J. W. Shanks, T. J. Ray, committemen. 
There being no other business, the 
society adjourned. 

Owing to College Day falling on 
Friday, it was decided to have the 
regular meeting on Thursday. Plans 
were laid to have an extra good 
program. 



F. H. Lotterhos Addresses 
Y. M. C. A. 



The Y. M. C. A. was honored and 
delighted by an address by Hon. F. H. 
Lotterhos last Friday night. Mr. 
Lotterhos is well known by most of 
the students and was heard with a 
great deal of interest and apprecia- 
tion. 

The subject of the address was, 
“Why Most Men Never Rise Above 
Mediocrity.” Mr. Lotterhos spoke of 
the necessity of a definite purpose and 
chosen profession as probable paths 
to success. He also emphasized 
thoroughness and perfection in our 
daily accomplishments. 

The musical treat was in the form 
of a solo by Miss Katherine Tucker. 
Miss Tucker is a very accomplished 
singer, and the members of the Y. M. 
C. A. were delighted to have the privi- 
lege of hearing her. 



Preps Worsted By A. H. S. 



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In a hard fought game of football 
the Preps lost to the Summit (Pike 
County) A. H. S. last Saturday. The 
game was played on the College Ath- 
letic field. The score was 19-7. 

Their easy victory over the Ray- 
mond team last week caused un- 
wanted confidence among the Preps. 
The fast efficient playing of the visi- 
tors in the first quarter gained them 
an advantage that coultn’t be over- 
come. 

However, the Preps have been 
strengthened by the addition of one 
or two good men, and the team is 
training hard for its next game. 



Geologist Encounters Pliocene 
Horse 



(Continued from page 1) 
finally chooses a cigar that looks not 
quite as bad as the rest. After bor- 
rowing a match, he steps outside to 
light up, but soon returns for another 
match. After four or five such at- 
tempts, he decides that such a cigar 
is too valuable to smoke and marks 
it as Exhibit “A” of his Geological 
specimens. 

Groot soon returns with a car, 
but, as he can carry only a few, the 
Young Geologist decides to walk. This 
proves quite a diversion, as Groot is 
walking also; and soon the Young Geo- 
logist becomes so facinated with the 
Doctor’s talk that he does not realize 
the rate of speed he is traveling. The 
first stopping place is reached in ap- 
parently a few seconds. Here a rest 
is taken, while the car catches up. 

From here on the class walks, be- 
cause the traveling is very rough on 
account of the contours. These are 
found to be scattered over the country 
in quite a tangle. This seems to be 
due to the fact that for seventeen 
years the class has annually attempt- 
ed to establish a separate set of con- 
tours. 

The Young Geologist and the class 
under the guidance of Groot success- 
fully wander out of this labyrinth and 
soon find themselves wandering in and 
out many deep and narrow gullies. 
These, they are informed, were caused 
by Erosion. The Young Geologist is 
at loss as to what period this monster 
lived in, but takes note of it and keeps 
moving. He begins to wonder about 
the petrified forest which he expected 
to see. He questions one of his com- 
panions as to its location and learns 
that it is a good many miles to the 
rear of the party, and that, owing 
to the amazing speed at which they 
are traveling, no one has been able 
to get more than a glimpse of it. 

A short rest is made in a little 
pine grove. This does not last long, 
however, on account of the wild 
Pliocene Horses, of which Dr. Sulli- 
van says he has found traces and 
which are known to roam in this 
region and to be very dangerous.. 

After about two hours of traveling 
in which the Young Geologist has 
lost all recollection of distance or 
direction, the class returns to the place 
they started from. Here, the first 
creature under a million years of age 
is encountered in the form of a young 
fried chicken. With this, there is a 
delicious lunch prepared by the co- 
eds of the class. 

Time is still flying fast and on con- 
sulting their watches the class find 
that they have 20 minutes in which 
to walk five miles to catch the “Sun- 
down Special”. Dr. Sullivan sets the 
pace and the class is soon at the 
station, ready to catch the train, 



Prentiss Literary Society 

The Prentiss Literary Society held 
its regular meeting on Friday night, 
and a very interesting program was 
carried out. The subject for the de- 
bate was: “Resolved: That students 
making an average of ninety should be 
exempted from examinations.” Messrs. 
Wheat and Willey of the negative 
won the decision over the affirmative 
contestants, Messrs. Price and Weis- 
inger. Mr. Hooker delivered the 
declamation. 



A number of A. & M. men were 
visitors on the campus last Friday 
and Saturday. They had come down 
to witness the football clash with 
Mississippi College, and came out to 
see some of their friends. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



The Y. W. C. A. held its weekly 
meeting in the Hut last Thursday at 
1 o’clock. Nellie Clark, the Devo- 
tional Chairman, presided. The scrip- 
ture lesson was taken from John 3. 
Readings were then given in order, 
each one beginning with one of the 
letters of the word “Gospel,” and the 
entire list of readings eventually spell- 
ing the word. Then sentence prayers 
were made by several of the members 
present. Marguerite Voight, Grace 
McMullen, Ruby McClellan, and Doro- 
thy Carroll each made talks on friend- 
ship, showing what Jesus did for His 
friends and what some of them did 
for Jesus. 

After the regular program was com- 
pleted, Isabel Johnston told of the 
prospects for a co-ed basket-ball team, 
composed of girls who are willing to 
come out and work for Millsaps. 

Belle Lindsey then talked about the 
need for an advisory committee for 
the Y. W. this session, and announced 
that Professor and Mrs. Bowen and 
Mrs. Watkins haVe been selected as 
that committee. 

The meeting was adjourned after 
the girls had been exhorted to bear 
in mind the pie and sandwich sale 
which is staged at the Hut each Sat- 
urday morning. 



CLOTHES AND THE MAN j ft 



LAMARS DISCUSS KU KLUX KLAN 



(Continued from page 1) 
however, saw fit to render a decision 
in favor of the affirmative. 

In the impromptu debate four fresh- 
men were given an opportunity to 
show their mettle and they all made 
a really good showing. The subject 
was. Resolved: That all freshmen 

should be required to have their heads 
clipped. Freshmen Flowers and Gal- 
loway spoke for the affirmative — 
whether or not their hearts were in 
it is not known. Harris and Gunn 
opposed the clipping of hair, and it 
seemed that they were all sincerity. 
The Anti-hair Party won the decision. 

Among the business matters settled 
at the meeting was the election of 
debaters for the inter-collegiate con- 
tests. Those selected were: E. K. 
Windham for the Emory University 
debate; Mack Swearingen, University 
of Mississippi; Austen Joyner, Bir- 
mingham Southern; J. F. Watson and 
H. C. Young, Triangular Debate. All 
tried men. these are expected by the 
Lamars to win honors for their socie- 
ty. 



Possibility of including Harvard on 
the Tulane debating schedule was an 
nounced by the varsity debating team. 

— Tulane Hullabaloo. 



Thirty-seven per cent of the co-eds 
at Oglethorpe this year are red head 
ed. There are different shades of 
red from the “bull-fight” to the red- 
dish brown. — The Petrel. How many 
bobbed-haired ones have we got? 



The enrollment at L. S. U. this year 
is expected to be more than 1100 when 
it comes to completion for the entire 
year. The freshman class is the larg- 
est in history. Six new additions 
have been made to the faculty. — The 
Reveille. 



The students and alumni of the Uni- 
versity of Georgia have begun a drive 
for a million dollars, the purpose in 
view being the erection of a million 
dollar memorial to the Georgia men 
who lost their lives in the war. — The 
Red and Black. 



Some say they make him; but, in 
our humble opinion, they as often mar 
him. Apollo would pass for a green 
freshman if he were properly ragged. 
Let him take as little pride of appear- 
ance as some men seem to take, and 
Apollo would be quite unrecognizable. 
Good form, well muffled, gets little 
praise. 

There was a time when certain 
clothes made a man, whereas those 
same clothes would now ruin him. How 
about peg-tops, yellow shoes, colored 
silk collars, etc.? We would almost re- 
frain from mentioning the ancient and 
venerable brown derby — verily, a 
manly piece of furniture. Said derby 
gave no cause for worry through grad- 
ual change to a sickly green, as does 
the modern and less hardy derby. 

But let us hark back yet farther in 
the annals of styles. We skip with 
glee when we ruminate on the graceful 
and comfortable fashions in the 
knightly age. Furthermore, a tailor’s 
bill must have been a rare luxury 
then, when men disported themselves 

in iron suits. The tailors only chance 
was to slip up behind some unsuspect- 
ing gallant and spill the acid on his 
Sunday garb, or else wait for nature 
to rust out the offending pants. Sneak- 
ing of pants, we often wonder whether 
a Highlander wears bloomers beneath 
his skirts. 

Who invented clothes? Is the 
prime idea beauty or comfort? At any 
rate, we are very glad that some old 
philosopher did discover man’s need 
and tell him about clothes. For we can 
imagine many embarrassing situations 
which might arise otherwise. 

Did you ever think how necessary 
our clothing stores are with their al- 
luring advertisements? If it were not 
for them, we would not buy half as 
many clothes as we do, for w T e would 
not know that new styles come in 
each season and year. We would prob- 
ably be content to go about in 
patched clothes of a very old vintage. 

While we are' mentioning patches, 
we wish to give them jjroper praise. 
Patches are good things in pants. The 
pants look much better with them than 
without them. That is, if they need 
them. A real, artistic half-sole on a 
pair of care-worn pantaloons is a thing 
of beauty and a joy forever. 

Hurray for the jelly. He serves a 
purpose in keeping us impressed with 
the proper way to dress. That pur- 
pose is a noble one, too. To be w ell 
dressed is an advertisement for any 
man. 

The well dressed man can reasona- 
bly expect to be more successful in 
life than the poorl}’ dressed, other 
things being equal. Is there an excuse 
for the man who deliberately allows 
himself to be shabby? None. If hs in- 
sists on wearing ill-fitting and out-land- 
ish clothes, it is all right; but let him 
refrain from ill temper and rage when 
he finds himself unable to make a hit 
with the queen of his dreams. When 
she submits to the charms of the rival 
who is tastefully dressed, it isn’t her 
fault. It is natural. 

It is always admirable to be inde- 
pendent, but if you express your inde- 
pendence by looking different from 
what is considered well dressed, then 
you are likely to let your liberty be 
your death. 

Clothes help a man wonderfully if 
they are the right kind; but, candidly, 
we believe they can ruin him just as 
easily. 



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| The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. 

NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 

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4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909. at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Saturday. 



STAFF 

























.... j. w Sells 


Associate Editor 


— - M. M. McGowan 



REPORTERS— H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, j 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour. Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, A. L. Joyner. 



MANAGEMENT 

Business Manager ___ — 

Assistant Business Manager— — _ — 

Circulation Manager 



ABOUT THE MILLSAPS MAN. 



Every man is affected a great deal by an organization to which j 
he belongs. If he remains a part of the organization for any con- 
siderable length of time, he definitely takes on the marks distinctive ! 
of a member of that organization. At the same time, the group is 
affected by the individual, but in a smaller degree. 

So it is with a college and its students; so it is with .Millsaps 
College and Millsaps men. 

If you remain here for four years, it is to be expected that you 
will be what you are. largely because of your stay here. If you 
remain here only three months, people will judge Millsaps College ( 
by you. They will know that you have been here, and they will ! 
hold the school responsib'e for your good and your bad qualities. 

- ^^Tlliirei'ai'e, consider what yxiifc do. Yap ha\ie uot t merely your 
own good name to uphold now. You have that of Millsaps College, 
and of its past, present, and future students to guard as well. 

There is a definite standard set for you to live by. It 'is not 
written down anywhere, and it may not have exactly the same terms 
in the minds of any two Millsaps men. but it exists just the same. 
You can discover that standard bv searching for what is highest 
and best in every possible phase of your life. 

Try to be clean, manly, helpful, friendly, earnest. Put your 
best into what you undertake. Stand by your friends. Meet de- 
feat and victory in the same way — with your mind on the future. 

These are a few of the rules. Search for the others until you 
find them. Then live by them ; and you will be the true Millsaps 
man. The heritage that is yours as a Millsaps man is a noble one. 
But its enjoyment brings with it a responsibility. 



H. B. Collins 

Geo. W£tts 

G. K. Hebert 



:❖ 



THE EMPORIUM 

We are Featuring This Season 

Two-Pants Suits 

► 

— for Young Men 

$35.00 

ALWAYS FRESH 

ALWAYS PRESSED 

Young men who like to practice econ- 
omy and at the same time get satis- 
factory service combined with style 
and snap, will be delighted with these 
two-pants suits. 

They meet every requirement of qual- 
ity clothes---ln style---ln fabric- --In 
workmanship. 

SOLD WITH OUR SPECIAL GUARANTEE 
OF ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION 





Pantaze 
Cafe.; 



t r* — t 



Jackson’s Pride 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

CLEANLINESS 

WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 



SOME FOOTB.AIL REMARKS. 



The reports that came back to us from the “Ole Miss’’ game 
last week made us feel good over the game, notwithstanding the 
one-sided score. We know that our team played good foothal'. and 
we know that the score-card results do not rccurately show the 
relative merits of the teams. 

Our team need not be ashamed in the least for the result. We 
are not either. 

And now comes the Normal game. It is the first game this 
season on the home field. We are not over confident, after our two 
defeats, but we feel that the team is ready to take care of itself 
today. In other words, we are baek of the team to win. 

Go to it, you men of the Purple Team. Millsaps College is with 
you all the way. Hit the line hard, and remember that your suc- 
cess is our success. 



Now that the Pair is nearly over, we want to take a census 
of all the students who can show a pocketbook containing as much 
as thirty-nine cents. 



Don’t be a knocker. If you can’t boost, then keep quiet. 



Which is the more unhappy — a lazy man with something to do. 
or a worker with nothing to do? 



Correct Clothes 
for College Men 

Harris ’ 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



All kinds of 
Sea Foods 
in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



- - - — = ■ 

Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE . j 

PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, j 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI j 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE" 








THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 



*> 



if 



I yi 
i'M 



■» 1 OOOOOOOOOOOOOODOD3DODOC003 ! 




m 

ftrolforO Cloth”*- 

When you see well dressed men 
you Instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

&tratforb Clothes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




The Journalism Department of L. 
S. U. has been reorganized, and now 
offers five thorough courses in news- 
paper theory and practice. — The Rev- 
eille. 



First Flea— “Been on a vacation?” 
Second Flea — “No, on a tramp.” 

— Tar Baby. 



Peek-a-boo! 

You can see through her Georgette 
waist 

And though her flimsy skirt; 

You can see through her stockings, 
too. 

And more — if you’re alert. 

But still you hear some people say — 
That is, the ones that knew her — 
When speaking of my Mabel dear: 

“I never could see through her.” 

— Pennsylvania Punch Bowl. 



“You cannot shake your shimmie here,’’ 
She saw T upon the sign. 

She pouted, shook the blame thing out 
And hung it on the line. 

— Sun Dodger. 



OPEN FORUM 

OOOOOOCXXXXXXXJOOOOOODOOOOD 1 



DORMITORY NEEDS 

A TELEPHONE 



Dear Editor: — 

There is a question before the boys 
of the dormitory that is of vital in- 
terest to each and every one of them. 
It is the question of providing a tele- 
phone for the use of the dormitory 
boys. All last year this question was 
agitated and nothing was accomplish- 
ed. Dr. Watkins refused to consider 
the question last year because there 
were two telephones in the dormi- 
tories. But he failed to consider that 
these were private lines belonging to 
Dr. Mitchell and the matron, Mrs. 
Joyce. This year we have but the 
one in Mrs. Thompson’s room. 

We have shown the facilities, now 
let us consider using the matron’s tele- 
phone as our President proposes. 
First, there are more than 100 boys in 
the dormitory that would have to in- 
vade the privacy of a lady’s boudoir 
every time they wished to us° the 
phone. Our very courteous President 
must have overlooked this fact when 
he again denied us this privilege for 
1921-22. 

We could use the phones in the 
fraternity houses but they are very 
far and are also private lines. There 
is one thing that the college man de 
spises (in the way that Ducky defines 
the word) ; that is a SPONGE or 
PARASITE. Are w r e expected to 
sponge on the fraternity houses? They 
are willing for us to use their phones. 
It is a privilege they extend to us 
knowing that we have no phone cf 
our own. We cannot abuse their hos 
pitality; we cannot abuse the privil- 
ege they have extended us. What is 
the thing to do? Have a phone of our 
own. 

But we cannot have a phone of our 
own because it costs too much. There 
are already too many phones on the 
line that ours would have to be at- 
tached to. Have a private line. Dr. 
Mitchell and the matron were not on 
a party line. It costs too much? If 
there is no other way out we will be 
willing to pay the bill ourselves. But 
that is not necessary. The telephone 
is a necessity and should be furnish- 



Girls used to stay at home because 
they had nothing to wear, — now look 
at ’em! — Ex. 



Gentleman ( at the door) : “Is May 

in?” 

Maid (haughtily): “May who?” 

Gentleman (peeved) “Mayonnaise!” 
Maid (Shutting the door): “Mayon- 
naise is dressing!” 

(Business of falling down steps.) 

— Voo-Doo 



[ ed us. It can be done. It should be 
done. But, if the administration will 
I not foot the bill, they can at least 
divide the bill among the 150 boys 
in the dormitory and it would not 
hurt the pocket-book of any one of 
them. 

1. Courtesy keeps us from invad- 
ing the privacy of a lady’s boudoir. 

2. We cannot abuse the hospitality 
of the fraternities. 

3. It is within the power of the 
college to furnish a phone. 

4. If there is no other way of rais- 
ing money, the expense may be so 
divided amoung 150 boys as not to 
touch the pocket-book of the individ- 
ual 

Respectfully, 

150 Dormitory Dwellers. 

A hearty AMEN. 

Matron and Fraternity men. 



“Say, I m stuck. Do you know any- 
thing about a flivver?” 

“Nothing but a couple of funny 
stories. — Ex. 



That the rooters of Vandy shall be 
accompanied by the snappiest of 
snappy bands was the moving spirit 
of an informal meeting held Tuesday. 

—The Vanderbilt Hustler. 



SMART CLOTHES 

FOR 

YOUNG MEN 

MADE BY HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 



They’re finely tailored by hand in the 
finest all-wool fabrics — exclusive pat- 
terns and NEW Styles. Satisfaction 
or money back. A hearty welcome 
awaits you at — 



“Jackson’s Best Store” 

KENNINGTON’S 

WALK-OVER AND HANAN SHOES 




He T* Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 1 

s S 

S Property of Athletic Association ;; 

| Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



iiiMiuiiiiimiiioiiiiimiiiiiiimimmc* 

I FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE 1 

! Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. j 

JACKSON, miss. 1 



1 South State Street 



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1 




6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




AGRICULTURAL LOAN 
AGENCY FORMEO 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 



Representative 



War Finance Corp. Prom- 
ises Aid to Farmers and 
Live Stock Breeders 



Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 



ft. & M. WINS THE 
GRIDIRON CLASSIC 



Thousands See Struggle at 
Fair Grounds 



The band from Mississippi College 
was rendering the best of music, and 
loyal students were gallantly cheer- 
ing the boys in Blue and Gold; but 
all to no avail, for the hard plunging 
Maroons tore through the Choctaws 
defense and snatched victory from 
seeming defeat. This game between 
Mississippi College and A. & M. was 
the drawing card for three thousand 
football enthusiasts, and proved to be 
one of the closest and hardest fought 
battles seen in Jackson in many years. 

As the whistle blew for the play 
to commence, there was an intense 
silence in the stands, which was 
broken by the thud of Gatchell’s boot 
as it met the pigskin, driving it to 
Mississippi’s thirty-five yard line into j 
the waiting arms of “Goat” Hale. 
Then followed a punting contest be- 
tween . Hale, and Davis of A. & M„ 
which was brought to a close by Hale’s 
brilliant fifty yard run through the 
entire Maroon team for a touchdown. 
Hale kicked goal from placement, and 
the score stood 7 to 0 in favor of Mis- ' 
sissippi Within . the first ten minutes 
of play. Then the Maroons started a 
drive towards the Choctaw’s goal and 
were not checked until they had reach- 
ed the twelve yard line. At this point, 
the Preachers stiffened their defense, 
and held the Farmers for downs. Hale 
punted the ball forty yards to safety, 
and the quarter ended with the pig- 
skin in A. & M.’s possession on their 
35 yard line. 

The second quarter opened favor- 
ably for A. & M. when Davis went 
aroung left end for 27 yards before 
he was stopped by Hale. After sev- 
eral incomplete passes, the Maroons 
lost the ball to the Choctaws on 
downs, and Mississippi started a 
march toward A. & M.’s goal that was 
marked by the brilliant running of 
Tyler and Lambright. Upon A. & M.'s 
20 yard line, Hale pulled down a 
forward pass and went over the line 
for Mississippi’s second touchdown. 
He failed to kick goal. The west end 
of the grandstand, which was occupi- 
ed by the Mississippi College rooters, I 
went wild at this stage of the game. 
Several Maroon attempts to get with- 
in striking distance of the Choctaw’s j 
goal failed, and the first half ended 
with the score 13 to 0 in favor of | 
Mississippi. 

During the interval between halves, 
about one hundred A. & M. men form- 
ed a snake-dance in front of the grand 
stand, and cheered loudly. Then. | 
Charlie Borum, trombone artist for- j 
merly of Jackson, who was in the Mis- 
sissippi College band, led them in that 
mournful melody, “How Dry I Am.” 
This was answered with much cheer- 
ing and yelling from the A. & M. root- 1 
ers in the east end of the grandstand. 
While the band was playing “A Hot 
Time In The Old Town Tonight”, the J 
whistle blew for the beginning of the 
second half. 

Hale kicked off to Davis who re- 



turned the ball to their 40 yard line. 
For the next ten minutes the play was 
fast and furious, marked by several 
good gains by the A. & M. backfield, 
which were checked by Mississippi 
with difficulty. McGowan, of the 
Maroons, did very effective line buck- 
ing. finally breaking through the Choc- 
taw’s defense for a touchdown ten 
minutes after the half started. Mc- 
Gowan kicked goal — and Mississippi 
College’s goal line had been crossed 
for the first time this year. Then 
Gatchell kicked off, the ball sailing 
through the Choctaw’s goal posts; and 
play was resumed on Mississippi’s 
20 yard line. The quarter ended with 
the score Mississippi 13, A. & M. 7. 

Play was resumed in the forth quar- 
ter with the ball on Mississippi’s 20 
yard line, Hale punting to Clark who 
returned the ball to the 45 yard line 
before he was downed. From this 
point, play was marked by the con- 
sistent line bucking of the Maroons. 
McGowan, Davis and Cameron made 
steady gains through and around the 
Choctaw’s defense — an onward march 
that stopped only when McGowan 
plunged over tackle for the last four 
yards, and a touchdown. The crowds 
in the grandstand became almost un- 
controllable at this stage of the game, 
and many of them gathered on the 
side lines, some cheering, others plead- 
ing — all keyed up to the highest pitch 
of excitement. McGowan kicked goal 
from placement, and the game was 
won. This half was marked by the 
earnest efforts of Hale to break 
through the Maroons defense; but it 
seemed as if two or three men were 
on him the minute he took the ball, 
and he lost ground several times. 
Play ended several minutes later with 
the ball in A. & M.’s possession on 
their 40 yard line, the final score be- 
ing Mississippi 13, A. & M. 14. The 
entire game was marked by clean 
I playing on the part of both teams, 
i Hale was easily the individual star 
of the game, tho McGowan did excel- 
lent work for the Aggies. 



THE GIRL QUESTION 



I call on Ruth because she has a 
piano with lots of new music which I 
enjoy playing. 

I call on Emily because her father 
tells me funny stories. 

I call on Henrietta because I am 
kept warm — by the glow of her hearth. 

I call on Evelyn because I like the 
brand of cigarettes her brother 
smokes. 

I call on Flora because I like to hear 
her dad and mother argue. 

I call on Mary because she always 
asks me to stay for dinner. 

I call on Lillian because I love dav- 
enports. 

But I’m looking for a girl — she 
doesn’t need to have a piano, a hearth, 
a davenport, or even a mother and 
father, as long as she plays papa to 
me and comforts me when I am long- 
ing for my old girl back home. — Ex. 



An English dancer says sleeping 
outdoors makes one beautiful. At 
last we are able to account for the 
charming appearance of the average 
hobo, — Seattle Times. 



At a meeting of the members of the 
Committee named by the War Finance 
Corporation, held in Jackson, Monday 
October 3rd, the Agricultural Loan 
Agency for Mississippi perfected or- 
ganization by electing Oscar Newton 
of Jackson as Chairman, J. T. Thomas 
of Grenada as Vice-Chairman and 
Oscar Newton, J. T. Thomas and 
Frank W. Foote as members of the 
Executive Committee. Senator Leroy 
Percy of Greenville and Oscar G. 
Johnston of Clarksdale, the other two 
members of the committee, were in 
attendance. 

The organization of this Loan 
Agency is another indication of the 
desire of the War Finance Corpora- 
tion to extend its aid and it is very 
are directing its affairs are interested 
gratifying to know that those who 
in helping the agricultural and live 
stock interests. They have already 
rendered substantial aid and encour- 
agement in Mississippi and are ready 
to do more along that line. 

Under the plan of the War Finance 
Corporation, operating through the 
Agricultural Loan Agencies, banks that 
have lent money for agricultural pur- 
poses, including the growing, harvest- 
ing and marketing of agricultural pro- 
ducts or the breeding, raising, fatten- 
ing or marketing of live stock may, 
in turn, borrow money from the Fin- 
ance Corporation, provided their ap- 
plication are acted on favorably by the 
Loan agency in their own State. The 
Loan Agency can deal only with 
banks direct, the purpose of the plan 
being to aid banks in carrying their 
agricultural loans. No advances will 
be made for a longer period than pne 
year; and may be extended at the 
option of the Finance Corporation. 

At present the interest rate on such 
advances is 6% per annum; however, 
on advances for six months, not sub- 
ject to renewal and secured by Lib- 
erty or other Government bonds or 
warehouse receipts a rate of 5%% is 
offered. 

The Mississippi Loan Agency has no 
authority to grant or reject applica- 
tions for advances but will make its 
recommendations to the War Finance 
Corporation. 

Mississippi Banks that are now car- ( 
rying agricultural loans can secure 
funds from the War Finance Corpor- 
ation that will enable them to make 
further agricultural loans or loans of 
other kinds and thus promote the in- 
terests of their community and of the 
state. 

George B. Power was named as Sec- 
retary of the Committee and the of- 
fices of the Agency will be on the 
Fourth Floor of the Capital National 
Bank Building. Any inquiry address- 
ed to Agricultural Loan Agency, Jack- 
son, Mississippi, p. o. Box 344, will 
receive prompt attention and full in- 
formation will be given in reply. 




Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



CITY SHOE SHOP 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. .1. WALTHALL, Prop. 

1 : 



A 

.. [ jewf i.fh ; 



I 



Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Busy 

(The following report is somewhat 
delayed but is nevertheless of interest) 



The members of the Y. M. C A. cab- 
inet met for the formulation of vari- 
ous plans on Wednesday night at the 
reception room in Galloway Hall. Pres- 
ident Watson was present, and presid- 
ed over the meeting. Among the top- 
ics discussed were: nightly prayer 
meetings, Bible study courses, forum 
discussions, weekly programs for Fri- 
day nights, speakers for the near fu- 
ture, and printing of stationery. In 
regard to the forum meetings, it was 
announced that the faculty had order- 
ed them discontinued. The cabinet 
came to the conclusion that this was 
unfortunate, and so decided to peti- 
tion that they be reinstated with some 
additions. The cabinet wishes that on 
a certain day each week the chapel 
period be given over to the Y. M. 
C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. jointly. Stu- 
dent members of these organizations 
would lead the devotional exercises, 
conduct the singing, read, the announce- 
ments, call the roll, and offer either 
a well-prepared program of some kind 
or a forum discussion. 

Chairman Baird reported good pro- 
gress in the prayer meeting work, and 
urged that the system be gradually 
made broader so as to reach all the 
boarding students. It was decided that 
at least one out of every four Friday 
programs should be conducted entire- 
ly by the students. 



As reformers see it, there’s too 
much latitude in woman’s dress and 
not enough longitude. — Norfolk, Va., 
Pilot. 



And Now She Won’t Bow to Him 

She — “The book is perfectly hor- 
ried. It ought not to ba sold ! ” • 

He — -“How do you know?” — Ex. 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



/ 




The world is old, yet likes to laugh; 

New jokes are hard to find; 

A whole new editorial staff 
Can’t tickle every mind. 

So if you meet some ancient joke 
Decked out in modern guise, 

Don’t frown and call the thing a fake ; 
Just laugh — don’t be too wise. 



Kissing a girl is like a bottle of 
olives. If you can get one, the rest 
come easy. 



G. Ford; I flunked that English 
Ek: What was the matter? 

G. Ford; I had vaseline on my hair 
and the answer slipped my mind. 



Prof. Linn: What is the Ancient 

Order of the Bath? 

Freshman (puzzled) : I don’t know, 
Johnny usually comes first, then Wil- 
lie, then the baby. 



He: Did you know that they could 
make shoes out of all kinds of skins? 
She: How about banana skins? 

He: Oh, they make slippers out of 
them. 



A young girl whose last name was 
G inter. 

Got married in Jackson last winter. 
Her man’s name was Wood, 

And now, as they should. 

The Woods have a cute little splin- 
ter. 

Prof: Will some one explain to the [ 
class how liquidation of bills affects 
the banking system? 

Bright Soph: Yesser. After a duck 
goes in the water and liquidates his 
bill he always comes out for a run on 
the bank. 



Soph: Have you ever done any 

public speaking? 

Fresh: I once proposed to a girl 

over the telephone in my home town. 



Prof. White: Give me a short com- 
position on Geese? 

Freshman: Geese is a heavy set 

bird with a head on one side and a 
tail on the other His feet is set so 
far back on his running gear that they 
nearly miss his body. Some geese is 
ganders and has a curl on his tail. 
Ganders don’t lay or sit. They just 
eat, loaf and go swimming, I would 
rather be a gander. Geese do not 
give milk, but give eggs, but for me [ 
give me liberty or give me death. 



W. Galloway (at supper) : Shoot the 
butter. 

Ed Campbell: Aw, let it live. 



When in doubt about an experiment 
get somebody else to try it first. 



Balloons and tramps have no visible 
means of support; this also applies 
to socks. 



Ducky might have said: Most of 
those who tried short cuts to wealth 
are in jail. 



DEAR JACK 



The following letter was just hand- 
; ed to the editor of the Purple and 
White. It was returned to the college 
on account of inadequate address, and 
is printed here so that the writer may 
claim it. 

[ Dear Jack: — 

You & Squinty sure did make 1 
mistake & no lie by not comeing here 
to collidge. I didn’t aim to come with 
no eyes shut so my room was already 
took by me before I got here, so all 
I does is walk up and park, & here 
it is fore days and I aint been to no 
classes yet as I'm a wise bird & my 
name aint on no teacher’s role, so I 
just study down at Mr. Palace’s pool 
room etc. witch is pretty soft with 
no classes nor chapel etc hey Jack. 
And I dont aim to let these birds romp 
on me with no stick or no belt like 
some of these new freshmen, sos to 
be sore & etc. So I just parks up 
town most of the time except at meel 
time, and meel is right for we dont get 
fancy grub like I thote we wood but 
mainly grits and gravy & so forth. 

Yestidday I sure met one swell 
little dame an no jokeing, and she is 
some class and her folks have got 
plenty of jack, for she says so herself 
& she is working just for fun, and 
sure does look good to me & some 
class to, & all jokeing to 1 side. You 
aught to see her smile when she 
brings me my order, wether its oys- 
ters or soup, it dont make no differ- 
ents on the bill, witch is generlly 
thirty cents when the boss aint look- 
ing and that’t pretty soft aint it, and 
| I aim to go up to her house but she 
| wont let me yet but we drop in on 
them moving pictures sometimes but 
i I aint carried her home, witch they 
says here for see her home, either 
that or eskort, witch is stylisher, 
onley they aint any use in wasting 
style on you eh Jack. 

But all joking to 1 side, you aught 
to be here and see me stepping out 
& I aint nobodies fool, as they says 
and they aint any use in studying to 
hard yet hey Jack? 

Well I will write you b4 long 
Your Pal 

SLIM 

Some class to that b4 eh .Tack? I 
picked it up from a letter I got. 



Bowen (in Bible class): The lice 
that plagued the Egyptians were not 
like the lice we have today. 



Bailey (knocking on door) : Is Ford 
in there? 

Coursey: Xaw, What do you think 
this is, a tin shop? 



The best beauty hint we can offer 
is to mind your own business. 



Marriage is no joke: you don’t see 
married people laughing about it, do 
you? 



Watson: What do you play? 

Phillips: Nothing. 

Watson: I though you were a mem- 
ber of the Volunteers Band. 

Prof. Bowen says Moses taught the 
toddling nation to walk. We need 
another Moses. 




LOVE’S VERITY 



Oh sweet, oh sweet, I feel somehow. 
That love's grown cold, that even now 
The form that once I held divine, 

] Has lost its fragrancy as wine. 

The features that I once caressed, 

No longer now seem still possessed 
Of all that love would have them be, 
Of all that love would have one see 
In them of lasting purity. 



Oh sweet, oh sweet, when love was 
spring, 

About my heart love wove a ring, 

A glowing bond of golden hue 
That bound my own soul’s soul to you; 
That bond of love I could not break, 
Love giving all would nothing take, 
But now, alas! too late, I see 
That love as I would have it be. 

Is different full in verity. 



LOCHINVAR SMITH 



Oh, Loehinvar Smith has come out of 
the West, 

With press-agent notices all of the 
best; 

And Loehinvar Smith was extremely 
la mode, 

Instead of a horse, a Fierce-Arrow he 
rode. 

He hit her on sixty and drove through 
on high. 

Ignoring the cops as they watched 
him whiz by. 

He stayed not for brakes and he stop- 
ped not for gas. 

He shot through the traffic where 
none else could pass; 

But ere he slowed up at the mansion 
of stone, 

The bride had accepted another by 
phone. 

For a laggard in golf and a dastard 
in war 

Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave 
Loehinvar. 

So boldly he ventured, and cut all the 
wires. 

And boldly he punctured the bride- 
groom’s new tires. 

Then spoke the bride's father — the 
bridegroom stood numb — 

Demanding the reason for which he 
had come. 

And Loehinvar, dauntless, replied that 
he came 

To drink just one cup and to dance 
with his flame. 

The bride passed the home brew but 
first kissed the cup, 

The knight kissed it too, and then 
drank it all up. 

The jazz band tuned lively; he led the 
bride out 

And left the groom watching them 
both in great doubt. 

So stately his figure, so lovely her 
face 

That never a hall such a toddle did 
grace. 

One touch of her hand and one word 
in her ear; 

They soon reached the hall door: the 
motor stood near. 

So light to the car the fair lady he 



Freshman Martin (at post-office): 
Must I put this stamp on myself? 
Clerk: No put it on the letter. 

Co-ed: Do you approve of the Vol- 
stead Act? 

Fred: No I never attend vaudville. 



A Sharp Reply 

Tourist — What’s that beast? 

Native — That’s a razorback hawg, 
suh. 

Tourist — What’s he rubbing himself 
on the tree for? 

Native — Jest stropping hisself, suh, 
jest stropping hisself. — Widow. 



swung 

And light to the wheel right beside 
her he sprung — 

The Director yelled “Great” and ex- 
citemet ran keen. 

For Loehinvar Smith, the delight of 
the screen! 

— Selected. 



THE SENIOR’S SONG TO THE 
VAMPY COLLEGE VAMP 



She wears her hair in latest style. 
She always shows her luring smile 
Her eyes are large, and softly brown 
To make the heart go round and round. 
Oh! yes we’ll have to give the lamp 
To the vampy, college vamp! 

The Freshman is her easy meat. 

And with her little dancing feqt, 

She leads him just an awful chase 
Until some Soph usurps his place. 

And then we'll have to give the lamp 
To the vampy. college vamp! 

But of the Soph she also tires — 
Love cannot last, it soon expires 
And then she turns her eyes around 
And Lo! a Junior now r is found. 

And so we’ll have to give the lamp 
To the vampy, college vamp! 

But everything must have an end. 

This as a law' has always been; 

And soon the Junior lad is gone 
A Senior now takes up the song. 

And so we’ll have to give the lamp 
To the vampy, college vamp! 

L’ENVOI 

Oh! you vampy, college vamp. 

Oh! you sticky, postage stamp, 

I want to tell you just one thing 
Before you get a wedding ring. 

Don’t ever take a Freshman 
He’s just a foolish fool. 

Don’t ever take a Sophomore 
He's like a stubborn mule; 

Don’t ever take a Junior 
You’ll surely rue the day, 

But if you take a Senior 
You’ll go happy on your way. 



OUR CAPITOL 



There stands in stately poise on yon- 
der green 

The temple of our free and sovereign 
state, — 

A building to look on with humble, 
mien, 

As the dwelling of a government 
good and great. 

With marble dome raised into the 
skies, 

Above the puny, lowbuilt homes of 
men, 

I see the birthplace of our laws up 
rise, 

Just as the soaring haw'k flies o’er 
a wren. 

The pride of Mississippi, built by us 

How far it stands above its makers 
weak ; 

Its greatness seems to be miraculous 

And of a nobler power than we be- 
speak. 

The home of all our justice and our 
mercy — 

Each noble Mississippian to it clings. 

Like an ancestral, priceless legacy, 

With life and joy beneath its eagle’s 
wings. 

But what is there to reverence in 
this pile 

Of stone and marble blocks? Oh, 
there is naught 

Due to its earthly substance, form, or 
style; 

But of the hearts of millions it is 
wrought. 

It is but the emblem great and strong 

Of Mississippi’s host of noble men 

And women; and shall only stand as 
long 

As each of us makes a good citizen. 





8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



The Best Place to Spend that 
Idle Hour 



The MAJESTIC THEATRE 



Mississippi's Largest and 
Most Comfortable Theatre 



Friday and Saturday, Oct. 21-22 

Anita Stewart in 
“SOWING THE WIND” 
Clyde Cook in “THE TOREADOR” 



Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 24-25 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven in 
“THE GIRL IN THE TAXI” 

A Farce Comedy DeLuxe 



Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 26-27 

Ethel Clayton in 
“WEALTH” 

Dollar Marks and Hearts 



COMING SOON— Cecil B. DeMille’s Greatest Production, “THE AFFAIRS OF ANATOL”— with the greatest All-Star cast ever assembled 



ISTRIONE 



Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 24-25 

Thos. H. Ince Special 
“MOTHER O’ MINE” 

A drama of To-day 

Wed. and Thursday, Oct. 26-27 

“HABI T” 

A dynamic drama; a train wreck 
you’ll remember and a style 
show of unparalleled beauties. 

Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 

Charles Ray in 
“A MIDNIGHT BELL” 

A real Ray thrill with spooky 
chills. 



ISTRIONE ORCHESTRA 

Show Continues 2 to 11 
p. m. Daily 



I 



Ramblers Club Organizes 



I 



During a short rest taken by the 
Geology Class on their trip last Sat- 
uray, the Ramblers Club was organ- 
ized. The following officers were 
elected : 

President, Leigh Watkins; Vice 
President, Daley Crawford; Secretary, 
Austin Joyner; Rambling Rek, Dr. 
Sullivan; Cor. Secretary, Walter 
Stokes; Treasurer, N. E. Applewhite. 



Mr. Garland of Mississippi College 
was a visitor here last week, when 
he came over to sell tickets to our 
students. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICII & CO. 



J °H N C. CAR lffi 

i JEWELERj ; miS‘, 



Walter Stokes was sent to Clinton 
Thursday morning to do unto the 
Mississippi men as Mr. Garland did 
unto us. 



Red Herlong was on the campus 
last week. He is a student at A. & M. 
this year. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 
Wholesale 
Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 

EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



George Jones of Crystal Springs has 
been at home for the past several 
days, on account of his illness. We 
are glad that he is back with us now. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

United States, Hinds County and City Depository 

Capital paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus earned 225,000.00 

Undivided profits, net 25,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



The Kappa Delta sorority has sent 
out invitations to the following effect : 

“Mr.JL 

“Will you meet the Kappa Deltas at 
the ‘Black Cat’ in- Greenwich Village 
on Tuesday the first at eight o’clock?” 



O. L. Ellis visited relatives at Ellis- 
ville last week end. 



The students of the college and of 
the academy enjoyed a respite from 
class work on Monday after twelve 
o’clock. The occasion was the open- 
ing of the fair. 

“Ole Miss gets five new Instructors. 
— The Mississippian. 



"Dere Teacher” of The Spectator 
says “bobbed hair is bobberous.” 



Construction work on the University 
Radio Station is being rushed, and It 
is expected in a few days to be in 
operation. — The Mississippian. 



* 



Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 

at the 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 



-<• 



(t 



BARKER BREAD ” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



OB/MC 



IherO'Cola 



Out of fifty applicants .for the Van- 
derbilt Glee Club, only eight qualified. 
There seems to be a wealth of mater- 
ial. — The Vanderbilt Hustler. 

The beauty of bobbed hair is that 
it can be put back in place before 
the door to the parlor is opened. — The 
Mississippian. 



MEET ME AT THE 

CRESCENT BILLIARD HALL 

Under New Management Next to New Millsaps Bldg. 

O. S. JOHNSON, Proprietor 






z* 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBE 



R 



FOR YOUR— 



POPULAR FICTION 

1. “Let Bygones Be,” by Jones. 

2. “Eyes,” by George. 

3. “Rock A,” by Baby. 

4. “The Fly,” by Night 

5. “Man Cannot Live,” by Bread A. 
Lone. 

6. “Not,” by A. Jugful. 

7. “Missed,” by A. Mile. 

8. “How to beat Wall Street’ 
Hooker Crook. — The Spectator. 



by 



Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 



The rooster, like a lot of men. 

Can crow to beat the deuce; 

But when you crowd him for results. 
You find he can’t produce. 

— Puppet. 



ENGRAVED 

WEDDING INVITATIONS— ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CRESTS-— CARDS 

MONOGRAMMED STATIONERY FOR LADIES 
BUSINESS STATIONERY 

ONLY ENGRAVING PLANT IN MISSISSIPPI 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 





©Ije fhtrplp mb Mljtt? 



Vol. XIV. 



QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

MILLS APS^OLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1921 



No. 6 



FAIR NO! DEMORALIZ- 
ING SAY GALLOWAYS 



Sells and McCormick versus ' Collins is Associate Editoi 



EDITOR Majors Defeat Yellow= 

SELECTS STAFF j ac kets With Aerial Attack 



Honevcutt and 
Villee 



“You’re on the wrong side of the 
debate, Mr. Musslewhite,” spoke the 
president of the Galloway Literary 
Society as the first speaker on the 
negative of the impromptu debate was 
sweeping the society into a gale of 
laughter. “You were appointed on 
the negative and now you are arguing 
for the affirmative”, explained Mr. Bai- 
ley, acting president, “and I thought 
you wanted your side to win.” 

This was one of the many inter- 
esting and amusing incidents that hap- 
pened at the last meeting of the G. 
L. S. The program was varied in 
interest and was in keeping with the 
time of the meeting. On account of 
the holiday for the fair Friday, the 
meeting was held Thursday night 
Quite a large attendance was shown 
considering the time and circumstan- 
ces. 

W. S. Phillips, the declaimer, gave 
in good form the “Eulogy on Henry 
W. Grady”; he held his hearers’ at- 
tention for something like ten min 
utes and finished with more applause 
than has been given in many a day. 

State Fair Debated 

The subject for the debate was “Re- 
solved, That attendance upon the 
State Fair is demoralizing to Mill- 
saps College Students.” James W. 
Sells and M. L. McCormick were on 
the affirmative and M. L. Honeycutt 
and H. L. Villee were on the negative; 
all the speakers were interested in 
their subject and had prepared good 
speeches. 

The attack opened up with a broad- 
side against the gambling devices that 
infested the Pike, the main arguments 
of the whole debate hinging upon 
these “play pretties” of the rich. M. 
L. McCormick displayed quite a bit 
of composure during his speech when 
the lights went out. He kept right 
on speaking until they were turned 
on again. Honeycutt gave a rich dis- 
play of oratory which almost resem- 
bled Gordon’s pyrotechnic display. But 
the climax came when Horace Villee 
took the floor. As usual, he was pre- 
pared within an inch of the limit. His 
arguments were logical, his speech 
and language smooth, and all in all 
well ordered and fitting. A vote of the 
house gave the decision to the nega- 1 
tive, seventeen to nine. 

Nicknames for Profs 

The fun of the evening came with 
the impromptu debate. The subject J 
proposed was “Resolved, That the j 
nicknaming of the college professors 
should be abolished” — Hollingsworth ^ 
and R. C. Bailey, on the affirmative, 
and Musslewhite and Senator Gore on 
the negative. 

The cause of the fun was the pass- 
ing of a motion limiting the speakers 
to one minute each. This caused the 1 
snappiest debate that has been seen 
in a long time. All went well and j 
smoothly until Friend Musslewhite 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Crisler Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager 



The editor and business manager of 
the "Bobashela” have recently an- 
nounced the appointments of the 
whole staff. The editor and manager 
have been busy ever since their elec- 
• tion at the first of school, and are 
now ready, with their assistants, to 
get the book ready for the press. 

The first pictures for the year-book 
will probably be taken next week at 
Daniel’s Studio. 

The complete staff is as follows: 

•Mack Swearingen Editor 

Henry Collins Associate Editor 

Burton Ford Bus. Manager 

Bert Crisler Asst. Bus. Manager 

Fred I.otterhos Class Editor 

Walter Stokes .Athletic Editor 

Isabel Johnston Literary Editor 

Daley Crawford Art Editor 

Ada McDonnell Fraternity Editor 

Nellie Clark. Club Editor 

Warren Ware Humor and Statistics 

Although the “Bobashela" is pub- 
lished by the Senior Class, it belongs 
to the whole school. Every student 
has an equal interest in seeing it 
made a success. Therefore, the en- 
tire student body should be ready to 
help in any way in the preparation of 
the annual. Those who can draw pic- 
tures and cartoons are especially in 
demand. But every student, talented 
or untalented. chn help by being 
prompt in making his payments when 
they are due. and by being present for 
the taking of every picture in which 
he is supposed to appear. 



Mrs. John L. Ferguson, As- 
sistant in French and 
German 

Mrs. John L. Ferguson, a daughter 
of our president, Dr. Watkins, wife of 
the headmaster of the Academy, and 
a graduate of Millsaps College, has 
been chosen as the assistant in French 
and German. She will have both sec- 
tions of French I, one section of 
French A, and the class in German I 
and German II combined. Mrs. Fer- 
guson is well qualified for this place 
and we hope for her much success 
with her work this year. She was a 
member of the faculty of Randolph- 
Macon College last year. 



PREPS PLAY LAUREL 
TOMORROW 

The Prep eleven will clash with the 
team from Laurel High School to- 
morrow. The game will be played on 
the College field, and all college men 
are urged to attend and root for the 
Preps as they have so loyally done in 
the previous games of the season. 

The Laurel High team is considered 
one of the strongest junior teams in 
the state. Their defeat of the Louis- 
ville team two weeks ago indicates 
that the Preps must be wide awake 
if they expect to win out over the 
visitors. 



PASSING AND BROKEN FIELD RUNNING OF GAL- 
LOWAY FEATURES GAME 



PURPLE & WHITES 
SCORE FOUR 

TOUCHDOWNS 



GREAT THRONG 
WITNESSED FIRST 
LOCAL CONTEST 



We WENT twice and were con- 
quered twice; they came and were 
conquered. Yes, we won our first 
victory of the season last Friday 
morning when we defeated the Miss. 
Normal Yellow Jackets by the de- 
cisive score of 29-0. It was a game 
that was not filled with any thrills, 
but occassionallv some real good 
football was evident. The Majors at 
times played flashy football, but the 
whole game was marred by the fre- 
quent fumbles on both sides. The 
locals led the Hattiesburg hoys in 
this fault, however. If the Purple 
and White backfield had been able to 
hold on to the pigskin, they would 
have run up a much larger score on 
the Normalites, but usually when a 
touchdown was in sight and the ex- 
citement was so very tense the ball 
would become “slippery” and Mill- 
saps would lose it. 

Too much cannot be said of thi 
good coaching that the team has been 
receiving. for they put up one of the 
best defensive games that has been 
seen in Jackson for a long time. The 
feature of the local offense was the 
aerial attack, which they resorted to 
throughout the entire game. Gallo- 
way did all of the passing, and so 
accurate was his work that Millsaps 
completed ten out of twelve attempt- 
ed. He showed great coolness and 
judgment in his passing, and never 
seemed in a hurry even when sur- 
rounded by the opposing defense. 
Galloway, Fowler and Carr made sev- 
eral good broken field runs, while 
Musselwhite plowed the line several 
times for good gains. The defensive 
work of the entire team was excel- 
lent. 

Majors Receive First 

Capt. Windham won the toss and 
chose to receive. McEwen fumbled 
the kick off and it was Normal’s ball 
on our twenty yard line. The Majors 
tightened, however, and held the 
Teachers for downs. Stovall punted 
out of danger. Again the Majors held 
for downs, and by a series of passes 
and line plunges carried the ball to 
the Normal five yard line. Here Mill- 
saps fumbled and Normal recovered 
the ball. On an attempted punt the 
ball was blocked, a Normal man be- 
ing thrown behind his goal line for 
a safety. With the ball back on the 
thirty yard line, after a series of line 
plunges mostly off tackle plays, the 
ball was put on the Normal ten yard 
line. Here Galloway threw a perfect 
pass to Stovall who crossed the goal 
line for the first touchdown of the 
game. Musselwhite failed to kick 
goal. The first quarter ended with 
hall on the Teacher’s thirty yard line. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



The first home game of this season, 
which was played Friday morning at 
the State Fair Grounds with the State 
Normal, was witnessed by a very 
large crowd, many of whom were out 
of town guests. It was School and 
College Day at the Fair; therefore, 
a great number of students from all 
over the state took advantage of the 
occasion, not only to see the Fair, 
but also to witness the clash between 
the Yellow Jackets and Coach Free- 
land’s huskies. The Normal College 
was well represented, for some hund- 
red and fifty students led by their 
Cheer Leader came to Jackson by 
special train. The Normal bunch 
showed unusual “Pep” and came to 
take away the “BACON”, which prov- 
ed too hot to be handled. 

Both teams took the field amid the 
cheering of the students from both 
institutions. The Millsaps Royal 
Rooters, led by Cheer Leader Stokes 
and Villee, pulled a snake dance at 
the beginning of the game that com- 
pieteiy “rattled” (although it was not 
a rattle snake) the visiting rooters, 
who spent most of the time singing 
hymns in order to try to put a sting 
in the Yellow Jackets play. It was 
to no avail for the Yellow Jackets 
played like DIRT-DOBBERS. 

We have been asked by Mr. Stovall 
who made the first touchdown to re- 
mind the Alumni Association that he 
needs the new Hat. “Atta” hoy 
“Snow”, we jyiew your head would 
win out. “Pat” McNair is still won- 
dering whether he won a neck tie or 
a cravat. ALL THAT ANY OF US 
KNOW IS THAT WE WON A FOOT- 
BALL GAME AND THAT IT WAS 
THE FIRST GAME MILLSAPS HAS 
WON SINCE FOOTBALL WAS RE- 
INSTATED. 



Program for Lamar Liter- 
ary Society 

October 28, 1921. 

Declaimer — G. C. Clark. 

Orator — John Hillman. 

Debate — Resolved, That the Single 
Tax System Should be Adopted in 
Mississippi. 

Affirmative — I. W. Flowers, H. W. 
Shar'brough. 

Negative — J. D. Mullen, C. H. Gunn. 



Program for Galloway 
Literary Society 

October 28, 1921. 

Declaimer — R. H. Moore. 

Orator — George Jones. 

Debate — Resolved, That Millsaps 
College Should Have a System of Stu- 
dent Government. 

Affirmative — J. W. Shanks, T. J. 
Ray. 

Galloway — R. B. Bennett, E. O. 
Baird. 




2 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Don’t Say Drug Store 
Say 

SIMMONS & McGEE 

Your Business Solicited Free Delivery to Campus 



■ ■ i — m — 



Logan Phillips 

108 E. Capitol St. 

Headquarters for HIGH CLASS CLOTHING, 
SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS 
Clothing Made to Measure by Ed. V. Price & Co. 



HIGH GRADE CIGARS 

KING ADOLF DON REMO 

OSMUNDO FERN ROSA 

PRIMA LUCIA RED STAR 

VAN BIBBER SALOME 

CORR-WILLIAMS TOBACCO CO. 
Distributors 



Mississippi’s Best Launderers and Dry Cleaners 

STAR LAUNDRY 

Laundry, Dry Ceaning and Pressing 
Telephone 415 



Made on Honor — Sold on Merit 

EATMORE BREAD 
ACME BAKERY COMPANY 
Jackson Miss. 



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I LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING ! 
AND PRESSING 1 



□ 

S 



QUALITY, ACCURACY and SERVICE 
Phone 594 

WRIGHT’S LAUNDRY 



•Miiiiimiiiit]iiiiuiiniiciimiuiiiuaiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiic]Miiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiimii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii!iiiiiuiiiiiiiiimnmiiiiii!;i['ui» 



A Few Remarks By a 
Former Student 



FE IB ELMAN’S MEN’S WEAR SHOP 

Best Values for College Men 

LOOK AT OUR HATS, NECKWEAR, SHIRTS, 
ETC. OVERCOAT AND SUIT SPECIAL AT ALL 

TIMES. : : : 413 E. Capitol St. 



Dear Editor: 

Complying with your request for 
an article from an alumnus, I shall 
take this opportunity of adding my 
commendation of the excellent spirit 
existing among the students at this 
time. I had the good fortune to be 
present at the football game between 
Millsaps and the Normal College, 
The team showed up with the real 
stuff and I think part or the honor is 
due to the splendid support given by 
the crowd of rooters. The hundred 
per cent support given from the side 
lines added those extra ounces of en- 
ergy which the players needed to 
charge the center and to add another 
victory to the list. 

The spirit at Millsaps has always 
been of the higher type and the sup- 
port of the students has always been 
of a caliber unsurpassed by any col- 
lege, but the manifested “Pep” the 
other day eclipsed the record. A finer 
performance I have never witnessed; 
it was wonderful. 

However, in going over the campus 
and in talking with the boys, I was 
glad to learn that the boys are taking 
this same spirit with them into their 
academic work. Let me admonish 
them to keep it up; an optimistic 
spirit helps to span many a chasm in 
life’s journey. The enthusiastic unit- 
ing of spirits and potentialties for the 
accomplishment of nobler purposes 
and higher ideals helps all people to 
adapt themselves to changing condi- 
tions and to make touchdowns in 
every game of life. 

So keep up the spirited “Pep”, boys. 

Yours fraternally. 

An Alumnus. 



Fair Not Demoralizing 

Say Galloways 

(Continued from page 1) 
forgot which side he was bn and ad- 
vanced many arguments for his op- 
ponents. As soon as he was informed 
of his mistake, he as quickly called 
“time out”, shifted gears, and ad- 
vanced more arguments for the nega- 
tive. This quick retrenching causeff 
the decision in the finals to be given 
to his side. 

One main feature that called forth 
quite a bit of applause and praise was 
the Critic's report. Mrs. Jim Sells 
had been appointed Critic, and with 
a few well spoken words reproved 
those who had made mistakes and 
praised those that were worthy of 
praise. 

The meeting closed with a hurrah 
of laughter and conversation over the 
tumultuous impromptu debate. 



Band Plans Birmingham Trip. 

Hopes of Vandy’s crack band mak- 
ing the coveted Texas trip have al- 
most collapsed, due to the large ex- 
penditure of long green therein en- 
tailed. However, a sojourn down at 
Birmingham when the Commodores 
meet Alabama’s “thin red line” is 
practically assured — that is, if the 
railroad men decide to take pity on 
the public and not strike. Hence, 
the band is still practicing regularly 
with enthusiasm. Everybody from 
Alabama says that state is much bet- 
ter than Texas anyway. 

— Vanderbilt Hustler. 



Prof.: “Ah, you were in the foot- 
ball game, Saturday.” 

Dub: “Yes, sir.” 

Prof.: “And you got hurt in the 

fracas.” 

Duh: “No, sir, I got hurt in the 

shoulder.” — Petrel. 



Purple & Whites Score 

Four Touchdowns 

During the second quarter neither 
(Continued from page 1) 
side played much football. Fumbles 
were frequent on both sides and each 
team had to resort to punting. The 
second touchdown came when Stovall 
punted to the Normal ten yard line 
where the Normal fullback fumbled 
and McNair carried the ball over for 
the second touchdown. Galloway 
kicked goal. 

Normal chose to receive to begin 
the last half and received the ball on 
her twenty yard line. The boys from 
Hattiesburg succeeded in carrying the 
bail to midfield where they were held 
for downs. A battle of straight foot- 
ball was waged in midfield until the 
Normal Yellow Jackets completed a 
beautiful pass for thirty years; Gall- 
oway making a dandy flying tackle 
which prevented a touchdown. The 
Majors then tightened and held the 
visitors for downs. Several off tackle 
plays and a pass to Campbell for 
twenty-five yards put the ball on the 
Normal twenty yard line. Fowler 
then carried the ball around right 
end for the third touchdown. Gallo- 
way kicked goal. The fourth touch- 
down was made in the last quarter 
when Galloway made a twenty yard 
broken field run around left end after 
“Red” Carr had intercepted a forward 
pass and pulled off a sensational run 
for twenty-five yards. • The Majors 
again kicked to the Teachers. The 
final whistle blew with the ball on the 
Normal twenty yard line. 



MILLS'APS 


Line-up 

Position 


NORMAL 


Windham (c)... 


C 


Gafford 


Honneycutt 


...L. G 


Flurry 


Stovall 


...L. T 


McGillery (c) 


McNair 


...L. E 


Crawford 


Scott 


...R. G 


Bates 


McEwen 


R. T 


Parker 


Campbell 


...R. E 


Busby 


Combs 


O 


McCleskey 


Fowler 


...L. H 


Cook 


Galloway 


R. H 


Gregory 


Musselwhite ... 


F 


Clayton 


Substitutions 


: Normal, Scott for 



Busby. 

Millsaps, Carr for Coombs; King for 
Scott; Davenport for King. 

Touchdowns : Stovall, McNair, Fow- 
ler, Galloway. 

Goals from touchdown: Galloway 3. 
Score by Quarters — 



Millsaps 8 7 0 14 29 

Normal 0 0 0 0 0 



A girl (to drug clerk) : I would like 
some powder, please. 

Clerk: Yes, Miss. Face, gun or 

bug? — Ex. 



Hawaiian Students Adopt Honor 
System. 

Hawaiian university students have 
voted to adopt the “honor system,” 
according to word received from 
Professor K. C. Loebrick, in charge of 
the history department at the Island 
university. — Hullabaloo. 



Athletes of Today Better Than 
Greeks. 

Student athletes of the United 
States surpass the models used by 
the ancient Greek sculptors in phy- 
sical perfection, according to Presi- 
ent David P. Barrows, of the Uni- 
versity of California. 

“The early Greeks and Romans pro- 
duced a high type of perfection, and 
the Middle Ages produced great war- 
riors, but to my mind, the type of 
men and women of today is superior. 
They are accomplishing what these 
others failed to accomplish,” Dr. Bar- 
rows declared. — Hullabaloo. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



KNOW YOUR CITY 

Should a stranger passing thru the 
City stop you and ask you If there 
were any places in Jackson which 
could command especial interest, 
could you answer him, or do you 
know ? 

Of course you know that Jackson is 
the seat of government for the State 
of Mississippi, but do you know what 
institutions are here, where each one 
is located, or the nature of the work 
being done by each? Do you know 
how many institutions of higher edu- 
cation there are for both white and 
colored? Do you know how ' many 
charitable organizations of state-wide 
interest there are? 

Let us take a short trip around the 
City and study for a few minutes 
these buildings and what is going on 
in each one of them. Directly north 
of Capitol Street between President 
and West Streets, is located the new 
state Capitol building. It was built 
in the year 1901 at an expense of 
$1,250,000.00 — incidentally, the pro- 
ceeds of a law suit against the Y. & 
M. V. R. R. brought by the State, 
practically covered the cost of build- 
ing. Built solidly of stone and ce- 
ment, the structure rises two hundred 
and eight feet and is topped by an 
immense eagle. The eagle, in the at- 
titude of flight, is made of almost 
pure copper and measures fifteen feet 
from one tip of its wing to the other. 
The marble and granite used in finish- 
ing the inside of the structure are 
the finest obtainable and were brought 
from the four corners of the earth. 
Their colors and natural designs are 
innumerable. 

Besides the state officers, the build- 
ing contains a law reference library 
and a Hall of Fame. The Hall of 
Fame contains practically the whole 
of the history of the State since the 
discovery of this territory in the way 
of pictures and relics. 

The old Capitol building at the head 
of Capitol Street was originally built 
in 1839. The original material, lime- 
stone, was mined from a tract in the 
vicinity of Raymond, Mississippi, 
purchased from the United States 
Government. In 1917 the building 
was remodeled to provide additional 
office room for our expanding State 
government. Now the health, agri- 
cultural, highway, geological, educa- 
tional, banking and prison depart- 
ments are housed there. 

At the institution for the blind on 
North State Street the students are 
taught much the same as are those 
in the grammar and high schools. 
They are first taught the elementary 
rules of hygiene; then a course in 
“readin’. writin’ and ’rithmetic” of 
the same standard maintained by your 
public schools, is given. This gives 
the blind person a chance to develop 
his sound faculties; he learns to think, 
becomes independent, and developes 
into an asset rather than a liability 
to society. Trades, as broom making, 
piano tuning, and typing, are taught 
and the blind person becomes self-sup- 
porting. 

A short distance north of the Blind 
Institute is the Charity Hospital, 
where the poor of the State receive 
medical attention free. A statistical 
example of the good being done will 
convince you of its importance: For 

the two years preceding September 1, 
1919, 1540 cases of sickness were 
cured out of 1703 admitted to the 
hospital. Opposite the Charity Hos- 
pital, is the Baptist Hospital, a 
privately owned institution. 

At the extreme end of State Street 
is the Insane Hospital, the largest 



institution in Jackson and a city in 
itself — a community of some eight or 
ten buildings housing over 1500 pa- 
tients. There are maintained, a sep- 
arate hospital for treatment of the 
sick, a training school for nurses, a 
place for amusements, a tuberculosis 
camp, a sixty-four acre garden, a five 
hundred acre farm, a potato curing 
plant, hog, poultry, and dairy depart- 
ments, and an engineering depart- 
ment furnishing ice, heat, light, and 
power. The patients are treated most 
humanely and, medically, by the most 
modern methods; and every year many 
of those admitted, are cured and dis- 
charged. 

On West Capitol Street is the Deaf 
and Dumb Institute where those im- 
paired by the loss of their sense of 
speech and hearing are given a good 
high school education and are taught 
trades, thus becoming independent ] 
and developing into good citizens. 

For educational purposes. Jackson 
contains an up-to-date public school 
system, two business colleges, two 
institutions for higher education for 
whites and two for colored — Jackson j 
Public Schools, Draughon’s and the 1 
Southern Business Colleges, Millsaps 
College and Belhaven College, Camp- j 
bell College and Jackson College, res- | 
pectivelv. 

By way of outdoor amusement, j * 
there are four parks — Smith, Oakdale, j _ 
Poindexter and Livingston. 

To very few is the opportunity giv- [ 
en to travel far and learn of other ! 
countries and their people, so become / 
familiar with the things of interest j 
around you in your own town, state. 1 
and country. But particularly know 
the community in which you live. At J 
one time Emerson was visiting a lo- 
cality in New England somewhat 1 •' 
noted for a natural phenomenon. 1 
One morning, while walking, he asked j 
a native of the community to direct j 
him to this particular spot. The na- 
tive could not give him the necessary 
directions. Emerson marvelled that 
one living in the immediate vicinity 
of such a wonderful freak of nature 
should know’ nothing of it. Later this 
countryman came to the city in which 
Emerson was living, sought him out, 
and asked of him the location of a j 
certain monument. Sad to say, 
Emerson was unable to tell him. How | 
often is it the case that a person will j 
travel miles to see a thing that prob- ] 
ably would be of little interest to him | 
if it were located in the place in which j 
he lives. 

The foregoing sketch of a few of ' 
the interesting things in the city ! 
should be entirely too brief to satisfy, j 
Go look them up yourself, study them, i 
be< ome absorbed in them, know them ! 

A more lasting impression is to b? j 
gained from seeing a thing than from | 
reading about it; so again, look these ' 
places up and the knowledge gained ! 
will pleasantly surprise you. 



A wicked wretch once said, ‘‘Old 
maids are embers, whence the flames 
have fled." . — Ex. 

— 

Here's How. 



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I THE DANIEL STUDIO 



| The College Photographer 

The One — “Do you think I can make = 

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4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription - $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 

Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909. at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business comdiunications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Saturday. 



STAFF 



_Fred Lotterhos 
—Walter Stokes 



Editor-in-Chief .. — 

Athletic Editor — 

Associate Editor . 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor l M. M. McGowan 

REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 

Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 

Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, A. L. Joyner. 



E. K. Windham | 

Mack Swearingen 

-Miss Daley Crawford 
J. W. Sells 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 
Circulation Manager 



— H. B. Collins 
— Geo. Watts 
_G. K. Hebert 



PLAY THE GAME TO THE LIMIT 

The Millsaps football team deserves a word of praise for the 
victory of last week. Two overwhelming defeats were not able to 
dampen the spirits of the players in the least. On the other hand, 
every man seemed to be more anxious than ever to get into the game 
and help win a victory. 

That is the spirit that will win. and that is the spirit that is 
winning. Steady, earnest playing won that game on Friday by a 
safe margin, and it will bring many others to the same conclusion. 

We realize that our team showed many imperfections and made 
many fumbles. But that is just what is encouraging to us. The 
‘‘glory of the imperfect” holds its promise open to the team now. 
Our very faults give us a chance to improve ourselves, so that the 
next- victory wiU conns just the same, even against a stronger op- 
ponent. 

The support from the student body was the right kind at the 
Normal game, too. Everybody was full of pep. as could be readily 
seen. Cheering and snake dancing were performed in the most ap- 
proved fashion. 

So here we are at the middle of the season. There are three 
games behind ns, and the team is engaged in a two weeks practice 
period between games. The heaviest part of the schedule is yet 
ahead, and it is well that we properly prepare ourselves for the 
final contests. The team is doing that. The rest of us need to do 
the same. 

Let the “old guard” know every day that you are still behind 
them. Come out to the practice scrimmages during this mid-season 
training camp, just as you did before any games were played this 
year. In other words, don 't show that football spirit of yours only 
at the games; give it expression every day. The men on the team 
appreciate your encouragement. 

Our recent victory tells us to fight harder than ever. With 
every man doing his best, in whatever way lie can help, the rest of 
the season will bring satisfaction to Millsaps College. On the team or 
off the team, play the game to the limit. 



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The students and faculty members enjoyed the first holiday of 
the year last Friday, for the annual school day at the State Fair is 
properly observed by Millsaps College. This brief rest from class 
room duties in the second month of the school year comes at an 
opportune moment. Everybody is beginning to feel the tediousness 
of study. But, the holiday offers a chance for a little vacation, and 
the students come back to school with renewed readiness to do good 
work. 



Do not cut your classes. The two dollar fee is still dangling over 



you. 



You freshmen, take this as your motto today “I will not he 
satisfied with less than a diploma from Millsaps College.” 



Do you like this issue of the paper? If not. let us know what 
you think is wrong. We want to correct the fault. 



Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER. PAPER BAGS, TWINE. STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS,. 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES. WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

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JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



•MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE” 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




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When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
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famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

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suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




V — c--— I V 

“YOUR PEP, YOUR PEP, 
YOU GOTTIT” 



Were you at the "PEP” meeting 
last Wednesday? No? Well, why not? 
Fellows, girls, air of you, YOU sure 
missed the time of your life. You 
should have been in the line of danc- 
ing, shouting men that swept over the 
campus singing, "Your Pep, your Pep, 
you gottit, now keepit, dog gonit, don’t 
lose it, your PEP"; while they march 
ed to the stirring notes of the bugle. 
Down from the “frat” houses, on 
through the dormitories, gathering up 
men as they went, the cheering crowd 
marched. Right by the administration 
building, over to the Prep school, they 
went. As their voices faded in the 
distance of North State, the great 
bell began to ring as powerful muscles 
revolved it continuously. Then b~.sk 
they came with an ever lengthening 
line, right into the chapel, around the 
seats and through them until they 
were packed into a solid mass of 
men gone wild in an orderly way. 

Oh, but you should- liave seen 
Stokes in his glory! Co-ed, you should 
have heard your man shout and you 
should have been there to aid him. 
“Boom - jig - a - boom” “Rap - tap - tap ’ 
“Your Pep” and “Taps” were the 
chief of the yells and Stokes was 
chief of the yellers. So intoxicated 
did the boys become that Freshman 
Watson proposed that Mill saps take 
the Mississippi State Fair and show 
the folks how we were going to treat 
Normal. Poor Freshman! Great PEP! 



1 OCOODCCOOOOOCOOODODODOCOOD 

OPEN FORUM 

j OOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOODOOOOD 

THE NEW MILLSAPS 



October 28, 1921 

Dear Jim, 

I know that you will be surprised 
to hear from me and to know that 1 
am back at Millsaps again. When we 
left here in the spring of 1920, do you 
remember how glad we were to get 
away? Well, I have broken our agree 
ment never to return, and Jim, I’m 
mighty glad of it! Really, I did not 
appreciate this dear old school until 
I attended Singleterry College last 
year. I had a good time there, but 
something was lacking — and now I 
know that it was the Millsaps Spirit. 

Now maybe you think that Spirit 
don’t amount to much; but Jim old 
scout, you would, hardly know this 
school now. The buildings are about 
the same, but there is a difference in 
the atmosphere. Time was when a 
freshman had only a vague idea that 
there was something here known as 
the Millsaps Spirit, and felt that it 
existed chiefly in the minds of faculty 
members and old “Grads” returned to 
make speeches before the student 
body. You know, that was the idea 
we had. But Jim, that’s all changed 
now. 

As an illustration, let me give you 
a brief account of something that 
happened here last week. But first, 
let me recall to your mind Walter 
Stokes, who used to be such a quiet, 
studious sort of fellow', never mixing 
up in crowds very much. One night 
a few' days before the game between 
Millsaps and Normal, Svokes (who is 
cheer-leader here now!) called a “Pep” 
meeting, which w’as attended by near- 
ly every freshman, and many of the 
upperclassmen and co-eds. The dem- 
onstration of enthusiasm at that time 
would have inspired a w'ooden indian! 
There were more than a hundred pres- 
ent, and they^made the walls of the 
chapel, ring with their cheers and 
yells. 

And then, on the morning of the 
football game, there was enacted a 
scene that will be hard for you to 
picture, I am sure. Walter Stokes, as- 
sisted by Horace Villee (whom you 
will remember as formerly taking 
very little interest in such affairs) led 
about three hundred cheering students 
in a snake-dance around the football 
field and up and down in front of the 
grandstand. The marching yell and 
those given later during the game 
were rendered with a vigor and pep 
formerly associated only with schools 
like A. & M. and Tulane. And the 
Majors showed a fighting spirit that 
was unconquerable in this game; but 
yet there was never the slightest de 
viation from the “clean sportsmen” 
attitude that has always characterized 
Millsaps men. We won the game :9 
to 0. 

Later, in talking with some of our 
players, I was impressed w ith the val- 
ue that they gave to that cheering 
One said: “Why, Bill, a man with red 
blood in his veins just couldn’t help 
playing winning football with support 
like that!” And, Jim, can you imagine 
a freshman making this statement — 
“Millsaps is beyond a doubt the very 
best school in the state, barring none; 
and I wouldn’t go to any other even 
if I could go free.” Yet, I had a 
freshman tell me that the other day, 
and he meant it, too! 

There is something in the very 
air hovering over this campus that, 
when you breathe it, just fills you with 
(Continued on page 6) 



5 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY § 

Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
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and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



FAIR BUT CLOUDY 



(This is the first short story enter- 
ed for the Purple and White short 
story contest. Others will be pub 
lished later.) 



The sun rose bright and early, cast- 
ing a golden effulgence over the 
stately buildings on Millsaps campus, 
to the cheerful accompaniihent of 
crowing roosters and clattering de- 
livery-Fords. It was Friday morning 
— not an unusual circumstance at 
that place — hut it was the Friday of 
Fridays, a day which by the decree ! 
of precedent was given to the stud- 
ents of Millsaps College as a holiday. 
It was — well, to say It in a few 
words, without the respect due a time 
honored custom — it was Friday of 
fair-week. On that day one was ex- 
empt from the usual boresome ne- 
cessity of going to classes, and one’s 
soul might soar above the low and 
restricted limits of a prof’s field of 
knowledge. 

The boys were not unappreciative 
of the day of rest Up early they 
were, eager to begin the joyful day, 
and with a firm determination to 
make the "day” last until two o’clock 
the next morning. But alas, how 
weak a thing is the human will and 
how uncertain are the plans of men. 
These boys, this morning bubbling 
over with good spirits, were destined 
to creep painfully to bed, weary of 
limb and broken in spirit and pocket- 
book. But for the moment cheer 
fulness prevailed. Above the ma- 
jestic walls of Burton and Galloway 
halls arose brief snatches of song 
and the shouts of glad, young voices. 
With joy in their hearts and smiles 
on their faces, the boys in the two 
dormitories were waiting for break 
fast and at the same time anticipa- 
ting the pleasures to come. Happi- 
ness reigned supreme — no, not quite, 
but it had at least the authority of 
a constitutional monarch. 

Let the scene be shifted. From the 
gayety of the rest of the dormitories 
to the heavy atmosphere of Herbert 
Kitchin’s room was like a sudden de- 
scent from the realms of Paradise 
into the gloomy caverns of this vale 
of tears. His room-mate driven out 
by the weight of gloom to seek more 
congenial company, Herbert was the 
one member of a minority party 
which disapproved of the fair and still 
more of the holiday. Not that he 
was a Puritan in character and a bit e 
lawyer by occupation, for he was no- 
thing more nor less than an average 
freshman. But the world weighed 
heavily on his shoulders, and for the 
strange reason that his money weigh- 
ed light in his pocket. Seated de- 
spondently at a study table, still un- 
shaven, with his thick brown hair 
(which had been for a month under 
strict training towards a pompadour 
which would go both ways from the 
middle) all disordered, Herbert made 
an inventory of his finances for the 
fifth time that morning. One dollar 
and seventy-eight cents he produced 
from his pocket, and a thorough and 
systematic search through trunk and 
other suit failed to unearth another 
cent. But hark. The belj for break- 
fast rings. Life seems more desirable 
to Herbert; he will eat, and debate 
the question of suicide after break- 
fast. But never, never while the na- 
ture of femininity remains what it 
is, will his girl catch him at the 
fair with $1.78. 

Curiosity and rashness often pre- 
vail over judgment and good sense. 
Ten o’clock saw Herbert Kitchin in 
the lair grounds, with full knowledge 



of the fact that Miss Lottie Tolliver, 
of Elmville, distinguished for her per- 
sonal appearances and attractive 
“ways” and, above all, for being his 
girl, was there and was on the look- 
out for him, with unexpressed but no 
small plans for seeing the sights with 
him. 

Herbert’s evil genius at first whis- 
pered nothing more than that he 
should go to the football game, where 
he could root for old Millsaps in the 
middle of a crowd of boys and run 
little risk of discovery. Then, he 
would slip out without risking a walk 
along the Midway. But when the 
game was over he decided to cele- 
brate his team’s victory by spending 
the rest of his money in a quiet way, 
keeping an eye open for his dreaded 
girl. With a friend who was as near 
broke but without the additional 
trouble of having a woman on his 
mind, he mingled in the crowd, saw 
all the free acts and a few of the 
others. 

The two adventurers smelled some 
savory hot-dogs, drew near so they 
could smell better, and finally pur- 
chased some. A delicious meal, one 
fit for the gods, was enjoyed, after 
which they sought new diversions. 
A revolving wheel with a number of 
air-planes attached at the edge caught 
their eye. A ride in that, whatever 
it cost. The wheel spun, the passen- 
gers whizzed and banged through the 
air, and a strange sensation took pos 
session of them. The scenery grew 
distant, the steam calliopes gave mus- 
ic like angels’ harps, and — But one 
thing grew clearer and larger and 
closer. In the boat just ahead were 
Lottie Tolliver and her mother. To 
Herbert’s agonizing sight. Lottie seem- 
ed to be looking in every d-rcc'icn. 
and such was his anni’sn of spin 
that it was a great relief to bln' when 
bis attention was diverted by a dis- 
turbance closer to him if not so near 
his heart. For the motion of the 
spinning machine or. -vh’ch they rode 
’v’d an extremely unsettling eft c’ 
His friend drooped his hat and Her- 
bert himself lost something. Woe. 
woe, * * * * 

But crash! Smash! A stay wire had 
broken and the whole spinning w’ eel 
was breaking up into little piecet. 
Some parts went one way and some 
another, but they all went somewh-r;. 
The helpless body of Herbert Kitch- 
in was hurled through the air ia a 
south-easterly direction, and lind:d 
on top of the tent of a freak shrw 
Striking the canvas obliquely, his 
fall was eased, and his body with the 
heart still beating was gently depo it 
ed on the ground. 

And by the strango workings of 
Fate, another rider was hurled in the 
same direction. Lottie was cast on 
the same tent, so frightened that she 
swallowed her chewing-gum and had 
a vision of being saved by a hand 
some hero named Herbert. Down she 
slid, and dropped on top of her sti'l 
unsettled hero. Her fall was cusicn 
ed by the motionless body on the 
ground, and she was saved. Looking 
about her, she saw that it «vas no 
vision, that it had really be’ii Her 
bert who arrested her in her w 1^ 
flight through the air and saved her 
from an awful death by falling in 
some hot dog man’s frying pan. “My 
brave hero”, she cried, “How pale 
you look! Wake up and let me tlank 
you for saving my life. Now It is 
all yours.” 

Herbert could not run. He was 
still feeling too shaken up and weak. 
He wished himself at the other end of 
the world, but his wish was not grant- 
ed. He opened his eyes. 



“Herbert, you are hurt. Lie here j 
and I will bring our car around and 
take you away from here. I don’t 
care anything about the old fair any- 
how.” 

Fortune favors the brave and the 
lucky. Said Herbert: “Lottie, I have 
been looking everywhere for you, and 
couldn’t find you at all. Now I feel 
like getting out of all this common 
crowd, so if you are tired of It, let’s 
go to some quiet spot.” 



Disinterested Dope on 
Howard Game 

We clip the following quotation from 
a letter written by a Birmingham man 
who saw' the Millsaps-Howard game 
three weeks ago. His comments are 
entirely unbiased, as he knew none of 
the Millsaps players; and the state- 
ment is perfectly frank in its adverse 
criticism as well as in its praise: 
“Your team showed up a good deal 
better than the score would indicate, 
but they had several bad breaks. Sto- 
vall should have scored in the last 
minute of play, when he grabbed a 
Howard pass and ran about 80 yards 
before somebody got him from behind. 
Stovall looked like a fine man to me. 
while Windham also played well. 
Fowler was the whole show in the 
backfield. The others all looked too 
inexperienced. Also your quarters 
pulled several bones.” 



WHAT OTHERS 

SAY ABOUT US 

A man from another college spent 
Saturday night in the dormitory and 
too': breakfast with us Sunday morn- 
ing. As he was leaving, he made the 
•rmark that the boys at Millsaps have 
fine manners, in fact, finer than these 
of the boys in his school. It is very 
gratifying to hear others speak highly 
of us. but there is something for us 
to remember, and that is that other 
people are watching us. They are 
going to judge us by what they see 
of us wherever they see us. So it is 
up to us, Millsaps students, to realize 
that we are advertising Millsaps and 
that we owe Millsaps the best that is 
in us in advertising her. 

It is an enviable privilege to b-- r 
Millsaps man or woman. That privi 
lege has its accompanying duty 
which is to do your best. We w’ant 
not only to be better in our mannr: 
than the one other college, but bn 
ter than any other in the state end 
in the United States. It is a tUin- 
well worth while. It's in us. Ln 
us bring it to the front. And in doin' 
this we will round out our liv<-s i 
such a way that we and others wil! 
gain in our relations one with aneth - 



A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Md. 



OwJRafc. 

Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 
Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 

Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

CITY SHOE SHOP 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. .J. WALTHALL, Prop. 




OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 
jkOI) \KS 

Rooks mid Fine “ <ul ionery 

Kodak Film Developing 
a S pecinlty 

KYKK II A ( O. 

-OR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

The New Millsaps 

(Continued from page 5) 
a love for Millsaps that almost bord- 
ers on reverence, and you feel that 
no sacrifice, ard no effort is too great, 
when the honor and good name of the 
old school is at stake. 

I’m glad I came back, Jim, and I 
wish that you too could return and 
see this New Millsaps, and be a part 
of it; because Millsaps is now assum- 
ing her rightful place in the hearts cf 
her students, and is rapidly becoming 
known as an ideal school to which to 
send young men and women for the 
very best kind of an education — that 
which makes them not only ready to 
assume leadership In business and 
professional circles, but also ready 
and willing to stand up for right and 
defend it. 

Your old buddy, 

BILL. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




We note a great improvement in the 
faculty since a Patch has been added. 



Triplett — My side hurts while I am 
running. 

Flowers — Why don't you run on the 
other side a while then? 



Bowen (in Bible) — Did you read 
Judges yesterday? 

Knoblock — No, sir, but I read Life. 



Wanted by Groot — Someone to beat 
the band. 

Dr. Sullivan — Where do we get tin 
from? 

Sanders — From Detroit. 



Ducky says the halls are so quiet 
that you can hear a pin fall — provided 
it is a coupling pin. 



They say the cake we had Sunday 
was Pound cake, but I think that it 
weighed nearer a ton. 



Freshman Cook says that he has a 
teaspoon that was used in the Boston 
Tea Party. 



A bald headed man condemning 
bobbed hair reminds us of a wooden- 
legged woman condemning short 
skirts. 



Bert — I was just thinking. 
Co-ed — What with? 



Red says he won at the races the 
other day, but we didn’t see him run. 



Prof. White — Who wrote Macauley’s 
History of England? 



Freshman Watson is suffering from 
a severe case of sunburned tonsils 
caused by watching the Ferris Wheel 
at the Fair. 



Freshman Watkins to Junior — “Tell 
me, how much does the College pay the 
Monitors?” 



Freshman Shanks missed his dinner 
Friday when he went to mail a letter 
and was unable to get out of the re- 
volving doors at the Post Office. 



On the Geology Trip 
Bert — Daley, have an apple. 

Daley (patting “Apple” on the head) 
—Here’s my apple. 



At the Observatory 



Daley — Where is my star, Burton? 
“Apple” (interrupting) — Here I am, 
Daley. 



A man gave his pants to a colored 
janitor to be cleaned. The darkey 
wanted the pants, so he did not re- 
turn them. When the man called for 
his pants, the following conversation 
took place: 

“Dey jes’ won’t come clean, salt.” 
“Have you tried gasoline?” 

“Yessah, ah tried gasoline.” 

“Have you tried naphtha?” 

“Yessah, ah tried naphtha.” 

“Have you tried ammonia?” 

“No, sah. Ah ain’t tried ’em on me 
yet, but ah knows dey’ll fit.” 

— Maroon & White. 



Girls nowadays are very much like 
salads — a great deal depends on the 
dressing. — Kangaroo. 



THINGS WE WOULD LIKE TO SEE 

An adoption of the old cut system. 



“Ducky” without a joke to tell in 
class. 



“Egg” White wearing a wig. 



“Ek” Windham giving an oration on 
the Hon. Jas. K. Vardaman. 



An announcement on the bulletin 
board without T. J. Ray’s name signed 
to it. 



A debate between Abney and Honey- 
cutt on this question: Resolved, that 

the Millsaps boys shouldn’t be per- 
mitted to ride on the Belhaven Car. 



A Freshman who 


is not 


green. 


A Senior who 


doesn’t 


thin : h 


knows it all. 


• 





And co-eds in long skirts. 




I WANNA BE A TRAMP 

I want to feel upon my face 
The breezes cool and damp, 

I want to roam wher’er I list — 

I wanna be a tramp. 

I want to feel the throb that comes 
Of being of the free, 

I want to travel round the world — 

A tramp I wanna be. 

I feel adventure calling 
To far and distant lands, 

I feel romance a glowing 
Upon the tropic sands. 

I see two eyes a pleading 
And calling me to come, 

I see two arms outstretching 
To hold me close and warm. 

Oh, yes, adventure’s calling 
And glowing is its lamp. 

That calls to joys alluring — 

I wanna be a tramp! 



A LAMENT 

As now I sing my song of woe 
My heart is wrought with pain; 

A smile my face will no more show 
Till love-time comes again. 

What use is it to be a sport 
And shoot a slippery line, 

If, when you storm a maiden’s fort 
Her waist you can’t entwine? 

I like a balmy temperature. 

Warm nights are my delight — 

Then 1 can exercise my lure 
Out in the soft moonlight. 

I cannot use my honeyed words 
The way I joy to do, 

Unless the moon is at the full 
Or else its phase is new. 

But when the scenery is just right — 
The porch, the moon, the swing — 
The girl, e’en if a perfect fright. 

I like to closely cling. 

While a grate fire is nice to see, 

A porch swing will not tell; 

A sofa, though, you must agree. 
Might give a fellow his death knell 



Daughter (having just received a 
beautiful set of mink skins from her 
father) — What I don’t understand is 
how such wonderful furs can come 
from such a low, sneaking beast. 

Father — I don't ask thanks, dear; 
but I really must insist upon respect. 

— Hyphen. 



EMORY WANTS 

ATHLETICS 



This Article is Taken From 
“The Emory Wheel ’ 

The spirit of greater Emory was 
turned loose the other night when 
the band, raising the “Coca Cola 
Song” on high, led some seven hun- 
dred students in a snake dance around 
the athletic field. Vociferous yells 
pierced the night air. and still more 
came forth when the body assembled 
in the temporary chapel. Numerous 
speeches were made by prominent 
members of the student body, and the 
athletic program was presented to the 
boys gathered there; and those who 
were wavering at first, were soon won 
over by those syllables expressed in a 
manner putting the Shades of Demos- 
thenes and Cicero to shame. 

The students do not believe they 
are hasty in their action; they love 
Emory; they love the several members 
of the different faculties; and they 
merely want to present their side of 
the question in hope that the trustees 
will see fit to grant a gradually in- 
creasing athletic program, until fin- 
ally the sons of Emory will be meet- 
ing other schools united as one man. 
Every member of the student body 
has agreed to write every member of 
the Board of Trustees, and it is hoped 
that an extra meeting will be called, 
which will be given over wholly to the 
discussion of this vital question. 

The request of the students, as 
voiced in the letter from “The Pyra- 
mid”, was for a special meeting at 
an early date, to hear from a member 
of the student body and a member of 
the Alumni association. 

The letter sets forth rather speci- 
fically the ideas of the students with 
regard to an athletic program. After 
rehearsing the success with which the 
modest track program has been car- 
ried out, and asserting for it beneficial 
results for the students, and a distinct 
addition to the welfare of the univer- 
sity, the letter continued: 

“In advocating an increased ath- 
letic program this organization does 
not want to rush hurriedly into gen- 
eral athletics the first year. We will 
propose a very conservative program 
under faculty control. This program 
will be as follows: Increased track 

and tennis meets in the spring of 
1922; a light basketball program add- 
ed the next scholarastic year; baseball 
added the following year and football 
the next, if conditions are favorable 
for it.” 

“This campaign is not of a Bolshe- 
vist nature,” declared a member of 
the student body. “It is founded on 
careful reflection and long considera- 
tion. The matter is to be placed be- 
fore the board of trustees in such a 
manner, it is hoped, that the members 
will see exactly what is meant, and 
will be impelled to give the students 
what they desire so much in univer- 
sity' life.” 



The friends of Prof. Dearman are 
much interested in his decision to 
enter the contest for the Rhodes Schol- 
arship, the next appointment to which 
will be made Dec. 3. We cannot but 
believe that if his accomplishments, 
scholastic and otherwise, are set forth 
in the proper light, he will be suc- 
cessful. 



L. A. Jones, who was a student here 
last session, was a visitor on the cam- 
pus Monday. 



ELIGIBILITY RULES 
_ AT VANDY 

Article Clipped From “The 
Vanderbilt Hustler” 



University Regulations Governing 
Athletic Eligibility 



The following regulations governing 
eligibility to intercollegiate contests 
in all departments of the university 
will become effective on January 1, 
1922. 

1. No candidate shall engage in ath- 
letic training until he has passed a 
satisfactory physical examination un- 
der the supervision of the Director of 
Physical Education. 

2. Every candidate, before being 
enrolled in any athletic group, shall 
fill out a questionnaire showing that 
he is eligible under the regulations of 
the Southern Intercollegiate Associa- 
tion. This questionnaire shall also 
contain a statement signed by the 
proper university officer, showing the 
number of credit hours gained during 
the preceding year, and also during 
the term on which, by university reg- 
ulations, eligibility is based. 

3. The University Committee on 
Athletics shall pass on the above ques- 
tionnaire and shall decide as to the eli- 
gibility of each candidate, furnishing 
to the Director of Athletics names of 
all candidates eligible. Without such 
approval no candidate may take part 
in any intercollegiate contest. 

4. No student who has participated 
in intercollegiate athletics for four 
years is eligible for intercollegiate 
contests. 

5. After January 1, 1922, no student 
is eligible for intercollegiate contests 
unless he has spent one year in Van- 
derbilt University. 

6. No student in the college or any 
school of the university shall be de- 
clared by said committee eligible {or 
membership on any athletic team unless 
he is a regular student matriculated 
within fifteen days from the begin- 
ning of the term, and carrying from 
the period of matriculation not less 
than the full amount required of a 
regular student and unless the candi- 
date has earned during the preceding 
year at least twelve credit hours, and 
unless the term report on which eli- 
gibility is also based, shows the satis- 
factory completion of the term propor- 
tion of twelve hours. Furthermore, 
the Committee on Athletics may at 
any time during the term require the 
removal from a team of a student 
whose scholarship record is discredit- 
able. 

7. In the matter of term record, the 
grades for the work of the last term 
of the preceding year shall determine 
the eligibility of candidates for the 
football team; in all other cases eli- 
gibility shall be determined by the ie- 
ports of the preceding term. The 
subsequent removal of conditions will 
in no way change the status of eligi- 
bility as determined by the term’s re- 
port. 

8. If a student transfers from the 
college or any professional school of 
the university, the report last re- 
ceived before his transference shall 
govern eligibility according to the pro- 
visions of articles six and seven. 

9. The limit of absences allowed 
each athletic organization is four and 
one-half days, Saturday counting one- 
half day, but it is provided that the 
University Committee on Athletics for 
special reasons, may extend this limit. 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



bled on Stage or Screen The MAJESTIC THEATRE November 4th & 5th 



CAST INCLUDES 

Wallace Reid 
Monte Blue 

Elliott Dexter 
Theodore Roberts 
Theodore Kosloff 

Raymond Hatton 



Announcing the coming of CECIL B. DeMILLE'S Supreme 
Creation, the beauty Picture DeLuxe 

“THE AFFAIRS OF ANATOL” 

A vivid, tingling drama of love and marriage — Glowing 
with luxury, piquant with gay adventure. Played by 
Stars enough for ten pictures 



CAST INCLUDES 

Gloria Swanson 
Bebe Daniels 

Wanda Hawley 
Agnes Ayres 
Julia Faye 

Polly Moran 



«+ 



ISTRIONE 



LOCALS 



J. R. Bane ’20 was a visitor at the 
college last Sunday. 



Next Monday-Tuesday, 
JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD’S 
“ISOBEL”, or “TRAIL’S END” 
A Royal Northwest Mounted Police 
Story 



Wednesday-Thursday, Nov. 2-3 
“COINCIDENCE” 

A METRO CLASSIC WITH ALL- 
STAR PLAYERS 



Friday-Saturday, Nov. 4-5 
“TRUTH ABOUT HUSBANDS” 
A FIRST NATIONAL PICTURE 



ISTRIONE ORCHESTRA 



COMPLETE SHOWS 
DAILY— 2 to 11 P. M. 



A complete smoking room on 
second floor 

— + 





O. G. Dawkins ’21 came to the cam- 
pus last week. He is teaching at An- 
guilla this session. 



Jim Campbell went in his Ford to 
his home in Kosciusko last Saturday. 
He returned on Sunday. 

Among the visitors last week was 
E. E. Baird, who came with his wife 
to call on his brother. E. O. Baird. 



The Astronomy Class took its regu 
lar trip to the observatory last Mon- 
day night. No new stars were dis- 
covered. 

Chas. Powell of Mississippi College 
spent last Saturday night at the Mill 
saps Dormitory with some of his 
friends. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 

Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 

S P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT" SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 

EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



A. M. West ’21 spent several days 
with friends among the students last 
week. He is teaching at Collins this 
year. 



L. J. Calhoun, ’21, who is teaching at 
Merigold. was here last week end on 
account of the fair. He visited the 
campus several times. 



W. E. Corley and B. F. Coursey 
went to the home of the former at 
Ccllins last Saturday. They made the 
trip through the country. 



J. W. Sells and H. R. Lewis are 
planning a new magazine to be pub- 
'isbed in Jackson. This is to be a 
publication in the interest of Scouting, 
both of these men being scout mas 
ters. 

Dr. Noble gave an interesting talk 
ir chapel Monday on “What a Liberal 
Education Is.” This was the first of 
a series of remarks along the same 
line. 



Mack Swearingen, editor of the 
Bobashela, was taken to the Baptist 
Hospital last Sunday. He had to sub- 
mit to an operation for appendicitis, 
and it is hoped that he will be out 
igain very soon. 




FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 



go to 

J. A. HUBER 



“Snow” Stovall was the winner of 
the new hat offered to the first touch- 
down-maker for Millsaps for the year. 
The touchdown came in the first 
period of the Normal game, when 
Stovall intercepted a pass and placed 
the ball safely behind the posts. 



H. H. Mellard has returned to Mill- 
saps this week to enter as a student 
again. Those who were here last year 
remember Mellard very well. 



MEET ME AT THE 

CRESCENT BILLIARD HALL 

Under New Management Next to New Millsaps Bldg. 

O. S. JOHNSON, Proprietor 




IMPROVED VISION 

The man with impaired eye- 
sight is wanted here. We 
want to show him how real 
optical skill can afford him 
benefit. When the strength 
of vision is sapped by strain 
it is necessary to help Nature. 
That’s what we do. We fit 
glasses Correctly. 



C. R. V. SEUTTER 

OPTOMETRIST 

Century Building Jackson, Miss. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL 


A 

BANK 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




United States, Hinds County and City Depository 


Capital paid in 

Stockholders’ liabilities 

Surplus earned 

Undivided profits, net 


$200,000.00 

..... 200,000.00 

225,000.00 

25,000.00 


ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 

❖ — 






Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 
at the 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 



“BARKER BREAD” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



ENGRAVED 

WEDDING INVITATIONS— ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CRESTS— CARDS 

MONOGRAMMED STATIONERY FOR LADIES 
BUSINESS STATIONERY 

ONLY ENGRAVING PLANT IN MISSISSIPPI 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 




flu vph mb 



Vol. XIV. 



QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOV. 4, 1921 



MAJORS TACKLE 
PANTHERS TODAY 



STORY OF ARMENIA PRE- 
SENTED TO MILLSAPS 



ROCK FORMATIONS AT 



Bi r m i ng ham So n t h e r n 
Headed by Coach Brown 
Has Great Team 

Everything is set for a battle royal 
this afternoon when the Majors take 
the field in an effort to trap the Pan- 
thers. The Majors realize that it will 
be a hard fight, but they are going 
into the game with the determination 
to tame the Alabama Panther or to 
twist his tail until he screams for 
peace. The Panthers on the other 
hand are confident that they will take 
the Majors by complete surprise and 
claw them to death. 

Coach Brown (who, by the way. 
played for Vanderbilt the same year 
that Coach Freeland played tackle on 
the Commodores) has trained his 
Pahthers to scream and claw their way 
thus far this season for a very good 
record. They have held the strong 
teams of Miss. A. & M. and University 
(Continued on page 6) 

LAMARS OPPOSE 

SINGLE TAX 

Clarke and Hillman Deliver 
Speeches 

The Lamar Literary Society met 
Friday night to carry out its regular 
program. The meeting was called to 
order by the president, and the chap- 
lain led in prayer. Then the roll was 
called and the minutes of the last 
meeting were read and adopted. The 
following program was rendered : 
Declamation, G. E. Clarke; Oration, 
John Hillman ; Debate — “Resolved, 
That a single tax system should be 
adopted in Mississippi;” Affirmative, 
Ira Flowers and Malcolm Sharbrough, 
Negative, Dewitt Mullen and C. H. 
Gunn. Clarke’s subject was “The Un- 
crowned Queen,” which was thorough- 
ly enjoyed by all present. 

Hillman, the orator, announced his 
subject, “The Need of a Literary So- 
ciety,” to which he did justice. Hill- 
man said that every man should af- j 
filiate with a literary society and 
take an active part in it in order to ! 
become the type of citizen which a 
college man is expected to be, a man j 
who can think well, act well, and ex- 
press his thoughts to others readily 
and to the point. 

Then came the regular debate, in 
which Flowers maintained that the 
present tax system was unsatisfac- 
tory, that the single tax system would j 
be more conducive to the development j 
of the state, and that it would bring ^ 
about a more equitable distribution 1 
of taxes. 

Then Mullens, the first speaker on 
the negative, attacked the single tax 1 
system, saying that it was physically, 
politically, economically, and morally : 
deficient, and that it would discrimi- 
nate against production. 

(Continued on page 3) 1 



General in Armenian Army 
Visits College and 
Speaks 

The student body was quite pleas- 
antly surprised Tuesday morning by 
a visit from Mr. D. B. Bernard, State 
Director of the Near East Relief, and 
Major General Aghasprian of the 
Armenian Army, a member of the 
Royal House of Armenia. 

Mr. Bernard made a few introduc- 
tory remarks in which he outlined the 
work that is to be attempted by Mis- 
sissippi. He said that this state had 
agreed to care for two thousand 
Armenian orphans, and to try to see 
that they were again restored to their 
native country. 

He then introduced the General; 
telling of his education and of the 
services he has rendered his country. 
The General is a graduate of a college 
in his own country, of another one in 
Switzerland, and of Columbia Univer- 
sity. New York. Before the war he 
was connected with the Armenian Em- 
bassy at Washington. W T hen war was 
declared, he received an appointment 
in the Russian Army as a Major-Gen- 
eial and ser"-C throughout the *ar. 

General Aghasprian told us some- 
thing of the work done by the Armen- 
ian troops, of the atrocities of the 
Turks, and of the present condition 
of his country. 

He said that out of a population of 
less than five million and against 
warnings issued by the Turks, Ar- 
menia furnished over two hundred 
and fifty thousand troops, who served 
on every battle front. Because of the 
courage and initiative of the Armen- 
ian troops, they were always chosen 
to rout the Turks, who, toward the 
end of the war, always ran before 
them. 

He also told of the work done by the 
old people and the women; how they 
resisted deportation by the Turks, 
many times choosing death rather than 
submit. From the horrible events 
mentioned we can well see why the 
Turk deserves the name “unspeaka- 
(Continued on page 2) 

GALLOWAY DEBATERS 
ELECTED 

At a special meeting of the Gallo- 
way Literary Society Tuesday morn- 
ing, debaters were elected for several 
of the intercollegiate contests of this 
year. The election was held after a 
report has been submitted by a nomi- 
nating committee headed by M. M. 
McGowan. 

The result of the balloting follows. 
M. M. McCall was selected for the 
Emory University Debate; H. L. Villee 
is to oppose Ole Miss; and W. N. 
Ware meets the debaters of Birming- 
ham-Southern. All of these men are 
experienced debaters. McCall was on 
the Birmingham-Southern team last 
year. The year before that, Villee 
was on the Triangular Debate. Ware 
was winner of the medal in the Com- < 
meneement Debate last session. 



DUCKY SAYS— 



-v/ Geology Class Enjoys Sec- 

ond Trip of Year 

The fairy tales say that there were 

once great men who roamed the earth 

vJEsSfcjr .22. that were called giants, and that these 

I giants had houses as big as moun- 

O' tains and used trees for toothpicks, 
That sounds like nursery stuff doesn’t 
it. Maybe this does too. 

A book has been found that would 
i ' make one believe that there once ex ; 

‘ •> ’ isted such things as giants. This book 

| i s so large that it covers the whole 

state of Mississippi. The leaves of 
f this book are ten or fifteen feet thick 

and there is a silver book-mark in thi^ 
book that is three hundred miles long. 

DUCKY SAYS This boo!i iS dividetl int0 chapters and 

lines just like any other book, and if 
The reason SO many men is bsin S read just like any other book. 
I tViot TIl e pages of the book are called strata 

have mustaches now is that and the b00k . mark is the Pearl River 

they are drinking hair tonic. The pages or strata are opened at q 

line called the Town Byram. 

OTimrilT nnurmi Tbe next question one would 

N I 1 1 1 1 1 N I 1 V I H N - naturally ask is what kind of people 

UIUULI1I UUILI1II read thjs book and how dQ they read 

m [ A 1/ fj D C [] U otller personages than the Mill- 

I H I U fl Lu saps Geology class are the ones who 

j read c. The second question is not 
' j so easily answered. It would take; 

Galloways Meet in Regular f aBes aml pages t0 expIain just a 

• „ j little about how this book is read. 

Session j Possibly one would like to know; 

* what this class is reading. That i^ 

easy, because it was just last Satur- 
The program began with an excel- day that they read jn thJg boo( . 

lent declamation by R. H. Moore. He They drove over the pageK of the book 
spoke concerning careers for college to the Ilne8 cal , ed Byram Here ^ 
students, and chose as his subject, read some q ueer things They read 
“Bootlegging,” which profession he that millions of yearg agQ ^ wafi 



STUDENT GOVERN- 
MENT FAVORED 



declared to be equal in service to such 



a great ocean that covered this coun- 



professions as teaching, preaching, and 

v try. in this ocean there were manv 

banking. George Jones w r as the orator „„„ . 

sea animals such as we have never 
of the occasion with the subject of , 

, J seen. Millions of minute shellfish also 

"Success. He chose as an illustration { „ ... 

i existed in this great ocean. 



Abe Lincoln, whose success depended 
on no one save himself. Abe's greatest 
characteristic was not brilliance but 
honesty. 

The debate, “Resolved, That Millsaps 
College should have a system of stu- 
dent government,” had a star line-up. 
J. W. Shanks and T. J. Ray upheld 
the affirmative as opposed by E. O. 
Baird and R. B. Booth. The affirma- | 
tive showed the value of student gov- 
ernment as a training school for de- j 
mocracy and patriotism. The respon- 
sibility calls forth higher conduct. 
The negative thought that the present 
system was admirably suited to our 
present needs and strongly favored the 
present “regime”. To clinch their 
arguments, they quoted from Prof. 
Lin. The affirmative won. 

In the irregular debate, the relation 
to the Conference was discussed. It 
is doubtful if they would allow entire 
student government. The subject for 
the impromptu debate, “Resolved, That 
the Seniors of Millsaps should wear 



Then th.ey found that something 
very peculiar had happened to this 
great ocean. They found that far be- 
neath the bottom of this ocean there 
(Continued on page 2) 

Program for Lamar Liter- 
ary Society 

. 

Orator— G. W. Allred. 

Declaimer — O. B. Triplett. 

Debate — Resolved, That Millsaps 
Should Play All Its Home Games on 
the College Athletic Field. 

Affirmative — J. A. Harris, N. C. 
Young. 

Negative — R. H. Bennett, G. A 
Brumfield. 

Program for Galloway \ 
Literary Society 



is uuuunui u iiiey wuuiu anuw enure Orator J L Maske 

student government. The subject for Declaimer — E. N. Saucier 

the impromptu debate, "Resolved, That Debate-Resolved, That the .Milk 

the Seniors of Millsaps should wear Q „, . r i ' 

, * saps School of Law Should be Re-es- 

derbies. mustaches, and walking mblished 



canes.” was humorously and profitably Affirmative _j p Jones F A Cal . 
harangued. Again the affirmative was bo ^ n 

victorious. Other minor matters were N - egat 1 ve _ F E Ballard j w 

discussed, after which the society ad- jyiQQj-g 

journed. 




2 



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Say 

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GALLOWAY MEMORIAL 
PARTY 



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108 E. Capitol St. 

Headquarters for HIGH CLASS CLOTHING, 
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Clothing Made to Measure by Ed. V. Price & Co. 



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The students and faculty of Mill- 
saps College enjoyed one of the best 
parties of the year at the Galloway 
Memorial Church Saturday evening. 
The reception rooms at the Church 
were well decorated, and were also 
filled to the limit by the throngs of 
guests. Punch, apples, ice cream and 
cakes were served through the even- 
ing. 

The Belhaven girls were present, 
and added to the joy of the occasion. 
One of the features was the presence 
of several gypsies and fortune tellers. 
These plied their trade continuously, 
and many students (and some profs 
even) learned the mysteries of their 
futures. The hospitality of the Gallo- 
way Memorial was demonstrated to the 
fullest, and was fully appreciated by 
the visitors. 



ROCK FORMATIONS AT 
BYRAM EXPLORED 

(Continued from page 1) 
had been a great pressure and the 
earth had risen. This rising had 
caused the water to gradually recede 
from the land. Now all this did not 
happen in a day, week, month or year, 
but it took thousands and thousands 
of years for this to come about. 

How did the class know that this 
dry land was covered by all this water? 
This is how they found it out. One 
of the pages of this great book is com- 
posed of the myriads of shells of the 
shellfish and bones of the fish that 
lived and died in this great ocean. 
The book-mark (Pearl River) has 
opened the book at this page and 
all that remains to be done is to go 
to Byram and see the old ocean bot- 
tom and the shells which composed 
it. The class brought back some of 
these shells as proof of what they saw. 
The curious can find them in thb 
Science Hall. 

Some folks still might call that dry 
stuff. Well, it would be if that was 
all the class did; but don’t worry, they 
had plenty of fun. Who would refuse 
a ride through the country, especially 
when one could cut that French or 
History class? And then Groot is 
more fun out of class than he is in 
class. One of the features of the 
geology trip, also, was the delicious 
lunch which was prepared by Miss 
Eleanor Gene Sullivan. That and the 
tramp through the autumn woods 
turned the exploring expedition into a 
regular picnic. 



THE BUSTED DATE 



W’ith love so true it was dumb 
I believed in womankind; 

But wiser now I have become. 

Through cruelty refined. 

I saw the world in rosy hues. 

And life indeed seemed great. 

But now I’ve got the lonesome blues. 
Caused by a broken date. 

My date was with the only girl 
In the whole, wide world for me; 

Now sorrows thick around me swirl. 
Which I did ne’er foresee. 

This sudden fall from ecstasy. 

Caused by a charmer’s wiles, 

Has plunged me into agony, 

Through missing her sweet smiles. 

She is so false and yet so fair. 

My rival’s girl and mine — 

I love her every single hair, 

And hate them at the time. 

Shall I still love with vain desire, 
Affection unreturned? 

Or shall the child now shun the fire, 
Who’s been in love’s flame burned? 



AT THE SIGN OF THE 
TRIANGLE 



On last Thursday, the weekly meet- 
ing of the Y. W. C. A. was opened by 
the president, who conducted a busi- 
ness session before announcing the 
regular devotional program. It was 
decided that “sweets” in the form of 
home-made candy would be sold at the 
Hut on Saturday morning in addition 
to the appetizing sandwiches which 
many stray dimes are accustomed to 
find there. 

The basketball team is to have a 
“try out” sometime during the week, 
and we want to urge all the Co-Eds to 
come out. 

Two challenges have already been 
received — one from Ole Miss and one 
from Grenada — both wanting to play 
Millsaps and Belhaven on; the same 
trip. Even if: you are sure you can’t 
make the team, come make iti a trifle 
harder for the girls who do. A tennis 
club was also proposed as a; "sporty” 
idea for Millsaps girls to ponder on. 

We had a lovely devotional service 
led by Mrs. A. F. Watkins. She read 
the scripture lesson from Paul’s Love 
Letters, Phil. 4. Her sweet, helpful 
talk had for its theme the 8th verse, 
which enumerates the kind of thoughts 
college girls ought to have. She 
showed us how important it is that 
we should guard our thoughts, have 
them always ' clean and pure, and 
bring them under the captivity of 
Christ. 

Dorothy Carroll read the purpose of 
the Y. W. C. A. | and opened the meet- 
ing to general discussion of the ques- 
tion: “How can we improve our Y, 
W.?” Some of the suggested improve- 
ments included a greater interest in 
athletics, a desire to engage in Social 
Service Work,, a live foster Committee 
to announce programs, an absence of 
the prevailing spirit of indifference 
and criticism, and a membership con- 
test. The meeting closed with the 
Mizpah benediction. 



STORY OF ARMENIA 
PRESENTED MILLSAPS 

(Continued from page 1) 
ble.” He told of the disappointments 
of his people after the signing of the 
Armistice; of the broken promises of 
the Allies because of their selfishness 
and wrangling; of their disappoint- 
ment because of the failure of this 
country, through petty politics, to 
accept the Armenian mandate. 

His appeal for support of the 
Armenian Relief Fund was touching. 
He said he realized that we have al- 
ready given until it hurt, but their 
continued appeal for aid was no fault 
of theirs. Their people are still 
refugees in foreign countries and be- 
cause of politics are unable to return 
home to hasten the reconstruction of 
their country, so must still look to 
this generous country for aid. 



As the Centenary Endowment drive 
nears an end the prospects are very 
bright. About $150,000.00 have been 
raised already and the leaders are con- 
fident that the remaining $50,000.00 
will be raised. 

— Maroon and White. 



The Auburn faculty has been 
strengthened in practically all depart- 
ments this year. There are new men 
from all parts of the country, who are 
well experienced in ‘teaching. 

— Orange and Blue. 



Heard among the California fruits: 
“I cantaloupe.” 

“Oh, honeydew!” 



Leaves fall as fall leaves. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



Bowen Teacher Training 
Class Meets 



The Bowen Teachers Training Class 
held its regular meeting Sunday the 
thirtieth in the Galloway Hall. As 
usual a large number were present. 
We are afraid that a great many of 
the students do not know of this class 
or of the work which it is doing. 

This class was organized by Prof. 
Bowen at the first of this year. The 
officers are Prof. Bowen, teacher; 
Walter Galloway, president; and R. L. 
Williams, secretary-treasurer. The 
class meets in the Galloway Hall every 
Sunday morning at eight-forty-five 
and is dismissed promptly at nine- 
thirty. Thus all the members are able 
to attend services in town. The idea 
of the class is to train teachers for the 
Sunday School. This is a very in- 
teresting and important work. The 
class is not for freshmen only but for 
all the college and preparatory stu- 
dents. 

The subject of discussion last Sun- 
day was “The Pupils We Teach.” The 
points of the Church’s attitude toward 
the child, methods of approach, and 
the result of child study were clearly 
brought out by the teacher, and then 
a general discussion was entered into 
by the class. 



LAMARS OPPOSE 

SINGLE TAX 

(Continued from page 1) 

Sharbrough, the second speaker on 
the affirmative, took the floor in de- 
fense of the single tax system. 

Gunn, the second speaker on the 
negative, then took the floor and said 
that the single tax system would dis- 
courage the land owner, that the states 
that had tried this system had found 
it to be a failure, and that it would 
tend to turn all the land back to the 
ownership of the state, thus driving 
the state into bankruptcy. 

The decision of the judges was two 
to one in favor of the negative. Then 
came the impromptu debate with the 
question, “Resolved, That kissing a 
girl is like getting olives out of a 
bottle, after the first one the rest 
come easy,” affirmative, J. B. Abney 
and E. K. Windham, negative, J. B. 
Shearer and F. J. Lotterhos. 

The negatives won by a rising vote 
of the society. 

Under the head of new business, the 
proposal of Hendrix College for a de- 
bate this year was discussed, and the 
society decided to wait until next year 
because its debating schedule is al- 
ready filled out. 



STUDENTS OF CENTENARY TO 
PUT OUT ANNUAL THIS YEAR 



It has been announced by those in 
charge of the student publications that 
a contract has been signed with the 
Benson Printing Co., of Nashville, 
Tenn., assuring an annual for the stu- 
dents of Centenary this year. 

This is the first time an attempt 
has been made to put out an annual 
since the school moved to Shreveport. 
Those who are in charge of this work 
desire the hearty cooperation of every 
student in this forward movement. 

— Maroon & White. 



"We like the man that likes his job 
and makes his efforts show it — 
The man who thinks his luck is good, 
and likes to let us know it; 

We like him for the vim with which 
he rushes into action. 
Accomplishing his daily tasks with 
smiling satisfaction; 

We like him for his hopeful way, and 
for his constant pleasure 
In thinking Fortune must some day 
reward him in due measure.” — Ex. 



AMBITION REALIZED AT 
LAST 

At last, the moment was at hand! 
The golden opportunity for which I 
had been waiting and working with 
the greatest zeal for thirteen years 
was now within my grasp. It did not 
seem possible that it was really I who 
stood there at the portals of the vast 
unknown that had always seemed so 
distant and unattainable to me. 

I raised my hand to steady my head 
and was surprised to find that my fore- 
head was damp with perspiration and 
that my hand shook like a leaf in the 
wind. I had never dreamed that it 
would effect me like this! But with 
an effort, I gained control of my 
nerves — how silly of me to give way 
like that! There was nothing to fear; 
but yet, cold shivers ran up and down 
my back as my thoughts turned to 
what I was about to do. What lay 
beyond the veil? Thirteen years of 
waiting and wondering were having 
their effect on me now. 

A steadying voice at my side gave 
me new courage and strength. With 
a new determination, I braced my- 
self, steadied my head with my left 
hand, and grasped the instrument 
with my right — and then — I beheld 
the moon through the telescope at the 
Observatory. 



STUDENT WALK OUT 

AT EMORY AVERTED 



Upperclassmen Protest Faculty Action 
In Hazing Episode. 

A compromise at Emory university 
between the faculty and students of 
the junior and sophomore classes re- 
cently averted a threatened walk-out 
of members of both classes, the re- 
sult of the suspension of four sopho- 
mores and one junior because of an 
alleged hazing episode. 

Upon being given assurance by the 
faculty that the five students sus- 
pended would be reinstated after the 
Christmas holidays if the sophomore 
and junior classmen would return to 
their classes, the matter was settled. 

Students in these classes presented 
protests against the suspension of 
their classmates, signed by about 200 
of the students, and threatening a 
walk-out in a body unless their de- 
mands for reinstatement were met. 

— Hullabaloo. 



UPS AND DOWNS 
Four Downs. 

Down in the mouth. 

Down in the pocket. 

Down on everything. 

Down and out. 

Four Ups. 

Up in the morning. 

Up to the mark. 

Never giving up. 

Up in the world. 

— Gold and Black. 



IT IS NOT EASY— 

To apologise. 

To begin over. 

To admit error. 

To be unselfish. 

To be charitable. 

To endure success. 

To keep on trying. 

To forgive and forget. 

To keep out of the rut. 

To make the most of a little. 

To shoulder a deserved blame. 
BUT IT ALWAYS PAYS! 

— The Hallegram. 



Feathers have always been down. 



Electricity in Franklin's time was a 
wonder. Now we make light of it. 



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NEW STL DIO— BEST IN STATE 



.MENTALLY ELEMENTARY 
(Dedicated to any girl.) 

Oh this flapper of the present genera- 
tion, 

Little thing which calls forth deepest 
adoration. 

She is all to the good 
Though her cranium is wood 
And can’t digest my line of conversa- 
tion. 

Though she could not be called in- 
tellectual. 

Brother fools, she knows how to infect 
you all 

With something above 

Mere platonical love 

For her arts are extremely effectual. 

Without a great stock of intelligence 
She possesses most wonderful inno- 
cence. 

But this only pertains 

To the substance called brains — 

For to slowness she makes not a pre- 
tence. 

I spoke of her powerful attraction. 
How I couldn't but love to distraction; . 
When I'd hardly begun 
She said “Ain’t we got fun? 

How about just a little more action?” 

A 75-foot concrete rifle range has 
been completed at G. C. M. A. and is 
now ready for target practice. It is 
on 0 of the most modern and best 
equipped of its kind in the entire I 
South. — The Port Light. 



“IF’S” 

If Jimmie is a Campbell is Guy 
Hebert? 

If a girl strolls down the walk, 
does Austin Joyner? 

If “Red” is a Carr, is Gus a Ford? 

If Emily is a Plummer, is Kath- 
erine a Barbour? 

If Wirt is a Noble is T. H. a King? 

If E. F. is a Ballard, is Dorothy a 
Carroll? 

If J. L. is Sharp, is Paul Blount? 

If Bill Combs his hair does Sam 
Ball? 

If J, B. should Shearer, Would Hen- 
rietta Skinner? 



Three prisoners were up before a 
cross eyed judge.” 

Judge, to first prisoner: “Guilty or 
not guilty.” 

Second prisoner: “Not guilty.” 
Judge: “Shut up! I was not talking 
to you.” 

Third prisoner: “I didn't say nothin' 
your honor. 



A. H. FETTING 
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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription 1 .' $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 

Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 



STAFF 

Editor- in - Chief 

Athletic Editor — 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor . 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

REPORTERS— H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, 
L. Villee. 



Fred Lotterhos 

Walter Stokes 



— E. K. Windham 

Mack Swearingen 

Miss Daley Crawford 
J. W. Sells 



M. M. McGowan 

Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Stevens, Leigh Watkins. J. B. 
A. L. Joyner, D. F. McNeil, H. 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 
Circulation Manager 



...H. B. Collins 
— Geo. Wfctts 
_G. K. Hebert 



TRADITION 

There is a tendency nowadays to discount the past and to place i 
all value on present accomplishment. That tendency has had a 
natural growth, because it has come out of the practical and demo- 
cratic nature of the age. However, it is well for us to look at the 
other side of the matter occasionally, and think of the value of 
tradition, precedent, and the past. 

I 

We often' forget the powerful influence of background. The 
element of greatest importance in the perfection of a masterpiece 
is the background in the life of the artist. The power of his present 
work comes from his past experience and from the traditions that 
have found lodgment in his being. 

It is impossible to get away from what has happened before 
now. If Harvard were blotted out today with all memory of it, 
and if tomorrow it were rebuilt in twofold perfection and size, 
many years would pass before it could attain the strength that it 
now possesses. Its traditions are of more use to it than its millions 
of endowment. 

Every year that passes over a school gives added prestige to 
it. It isn’t the ivy on the walls of an old school that makes it re- 
spected; but the ivy proves that. there is a past and the accompany- 
ing traditions bring the respect. 

Our glorious present exists because it is built on the solid foun- 
dation of the past. Tomorrow can become great only because of 
what is done today. ‘ 



THE EMPORIUM 

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BIRMINGHAM-SOUTHERN TODAY 

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THE PURPLE AND WHITE MUST WIN 

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Royal Hotel Building 
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Emory University is working harder at pres, nt for inter-col- 
legiate athletics than we did two years ago for football. We wish 
for them early silfehes's and an entrance into the athletic circles of j 
the South. 



The Visit of the Armenian Major General to our ehapel on Mon- 
day mornHig*- In-ought a bit of world vision to the student body. 
Since the yj^r is,jav£E and we see few foreign' notables and feel 
siiglit neighborliness toward the rest of the world, it is inspirational 
to come in touch again Avith a big man from the other side of the 
earth. We need more of the touch with our brothers around the 
far corner from us. 



Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL. Pier. and Mgr. 

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120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE” 








THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 




When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

££>tratforb Clothes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




Sound sleeping is snoring. 

A bachelor is a man who doesn’t 
find his comb full of hair. 

— Mississippian. 



Hiestand: “Give me a match, Hold- 

er.” 

Holder: “Here you are.” 

Hiestand: “I’ll swear, I forgot my 

cigarettes.” 

Holder: “Tough luck! Gimme hack 

my match.” 

— Exchange. 

DOG NEEDED 

An irate fan, who had watched the 
home team go down to defeat, stopped 
the umpire as he was leaving the 
park. 

“Where’s your dog?” he demanded. 

"Dog?” ejaculated the umps.” I 
have no dog.” 

“Well you’re the first blind man I 
ever saw who didn’t have a dog,” re- 
turned the disgruntled one. - — Ex. 



HER RAPID RISE 
Little Mis3 Tuffet 
Sat on a tuffet 

But sprang to her feet — oh gee — 

In this innocent tuffet 
Sat on by Miss Tuffet 
Whs parked a mad bumble bee. 

: — Florida Times Union. 



OOCODCOOOOCXXX>OOOOOOOOOOOD 

OPEN FORUM 

ooocoocooooooooooooooooooo 

A GREATER MILLSAPS 



Edwin : “Whatever became of that - 

greyhound you had?” 

Crawford ^ -'‘■‘Kilted himselfl” 

Edwin: “Really?” 

Crawford: “Yes, tried to catch a 

fly on the small of his back and mis- 
calculated. Bit himself in two.” 

— Maroon and White. 



One of the firsfli things Millsaps 
needs is a postoffice. Here of late 
there has been considerable trouble 
arising from the manner in which 
the mail isi handled in the dormitories. 
This is a condition that certainly 
ought not to exist. There is one, and 
it seems only one, satisfactory and 
logical way to handle this situation. 
That is to get a postoffice. Someone 
may say that Millsaps is not large 
enough to have and support a post- 
office. Nothing will grow before it is 
prepared for; growth, before room is 
made for its growth. If this were not 
so, there would be no need for Mill- 
saps or any other school, but this 
is a truth that, must be reckoned with. 
And just as certainly as we want Mill- 
saps to grow (every loyal Millsaps 
man does want Millsaps to grow), we 
must prepare for its growth. We 
want a postoffice, we must have a 
postoffice, and we are going to have 
a postoffice sooner or later. Why not 
now? 

Another thing that Millsaps needs 
is a telephone in the dormitory for 
the dormitory students. We can not 
afford to depend on the matron’s 
phone nor on the phones in the frater- 
nity houses. “Little things!” some 
one may say. Yes, but nothing is a 
bit better than the little things with 
which it is concerned and which after 
all are important parts of it. Men’s 
lives sometimes depend on things ap- 
parently insignificant. The existence 
of an institution may and does depend 
largely on the little things which are 
parts of it. Millsaps men, we need a 
telephone in the dormitory and a 
postoffice on the campus. We MUST 
HAVE THEM. 

Then we hope to see adequate build- 
ings erected, not for the present en- 
rollment only, but for the larger en- 
rollment which w.e expect to have in 
the future, and which we are going to 
have in the future. We want to see 
the athletic field and equipment im- 
proved. We want to make room for 
the growth of Millsaps into the many 
activities which concern us now T and 
which will concern us later on, for 
Millsaps College has a future, if we 
work for it. If I did not think Mill- 
saps has future, I would be in some 
other school, and, if it needed these 
things, I would have the same ideas 
about this other school. 

We want to see new schools of in- 
struction introduced into Millsaps for 
the benefit of Millsaps and for the 
students of the state of Mississippi. 
Millsaps is the logical school in Mis- 
sissippi for a larger range of courses 
on account of its location, the needs 
of the state, and the quality of in- 
struction here. 

With Millsaps located at the capital 
of the state, there should be a law 
school here. There is more material 
for the study of law here than at any 
other place in the state, there are 
more things here to inspire men to 
be good lawyers, and there is a great 
need for a good law school here. 

In Mississippi there is, no place 
where a medical student, can complete 
his course in medicine. Such a con- 
dition should not exist. With the va- 
rious hospitals here in Jackson ac- 
cessible to medical students, and with 
an institution of Millsaps’ rank and 
influence, it ought not to he necessary 
for a medical student to leave the 
state to prepare for the practice of 
medicine. 

(Continued on page 7) 




SMART CLOTHES 



FOR 



YOUNG MEN 



MADE BY HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 



They’re finely tailored by hand in the 
finest all-wool fabrics — exclusive pat- 
terns and NEW Styles. Satisfaction 
or money back. A hearty welcome 
awaits you at — 



“Jackson’s Best Store” 

KENNINGTON’S 

WALK-OVER AND HANAN SHOES 






H* T* Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

• The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



.>iiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiit]iiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiHii[]imiiiiminiiiiiiiiiNic]iiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiDiimiiiHiK]iiiiiiimii(]iiiiiiiiii»c^ 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

>>]iimimiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiimiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiii(]miiiiimic]iiiiiiiiiHi[iiiiMiiiMii[]iiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiimiiiioui$ 



. MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



.j.iiiiiiiimiiminiiiimmiomni 

| FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE | 

j Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. ! 



1 South State Street 



JACKSON, MISS. 1 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




MAJORS TACKLE 

PANTHERS TODAY 

(Continued from page 1) 
of Alabama to fairly close scores, when 
you take in the size of the institutions. 
Then last Saturday they met our 
ancient rival, the Mississippi Choc- 
taws, in Birmingham and although 
“GOAT” Hale, the Mississippi star 
halfback, was able to reel off four 
touchdowns and kick as many goals, 
the fighting Panthers were able to 
score a touchdown against the strong 
Clinton team, which we mpst remem 
ber the Green Wave of Tulane failed 
to do. The Alabama boys have a good 
team and one that must be hammered 
hard if we are to achieve a victory. 

The Majors failed to have a gam" 
last week; therefore several of the men 
who were crippled in the game with 
the State Normal will be able to get 
back in the game when the whistle 
blows Friday. “Red” Carr, halfbac’* ] 
who showed up well in the game with 
the Normal, is reporting for practice 
again as if he never had had a “bum” 
leg. Coach Freeland has had the men 
out every afternoon, and although they 
have been unable to go through much 
scrimmaging, they have worked up a 
series of new plays that we hope will 
completely bewilder the Panthers. 

Culley and Reeves are still out of 
the game and there is little hope that | 
they will be able to come back any j 
more this year. Their presence on the 
team will be greatly missed. The team 
is ready, however, and the student 
body is backing it to put up the hard- 
est fight of the season in this after- 
noon's battle. 



LAUREL HIGH OVER- 
COMES ACADEMY 

On the College field last Saturday, 
the Preps lost what was perhaps the 
hardest game they have played this 
season. The South Mississippi cham- 
pions came up from Laurel, full of 
fight and pep, and went away with a 
14-0 victory. The Preps need no ex- 
cuses, for they played a hard, con- 
sistent game; but it may be said that 
they had just forty-eight hours be- 
fore played a hard game with Mis 
sissippi Reserves, and as a conse- 
quence, their line was badly weakened. 

The feature of the game, in respect 
to the Laurel team, was the efficient 
line shift by which they were able to 
make steady gains through the Preps 
line. The skillful pass work of the 
Preps is also worthy of mention. 



CO-EDS PLAY TENNIS 



JACKSON HIGH SWAMPS 
YAZOO CITY 

The Jackson High School eleven 
defeated the light Yazoo City team 
last Friday at the State Fair grounds 
by the overwhelming score of 47 to 0. 
At no time did the Yazoo boys threat- 
en to score. They were completely 
out-played by the heavier Jackson boys 
who scored almost at will. O’Ferral, 
Axtel, Kendall, and Ford starred for 
the local boys, although the entire 
Jackson team played good defensive 
ball. Coach Roberts (known to al- 
most every boy in town as “Prof” 
Roberts) had the entire Millsaps 
team as the High School’s guests at 
the game. This invitation was not 
only appreciated by the team but by 
the student body of Millsaps College. 
A large number of students attended 
the game and gave the local boys their 
hearty support. 



Through the untiring efforts of 
Manager “HALF PINT” Coursey, the 
CO-EDS at last have a tennis court on 
which to play tennis and to “arguefy.” 
It has been suggested by some bright 
freshman that the girls organize a 
LEAGUE OF TENNIS Players in order 
that the disputes which are necessary 
to every Co-Ed tennis game might be 
settled. However, the writer feels cer- 
tain that no real fights will occur on 
the court; therefore let them fuss it 
out 

The tennis court is located just north 
of the Administration Building. It has 
good backstops and the ground has j 
been prepared properly, so that it is 
by far the best court on the campus. 
Let us hope that as many girls as 
possible will take advantage of this 
court and get out in the open air, 
which will put blushes in their cheeks 
such as never have been seen before. 

It is understood that the M. A. A. 
is going to put several more courts I 
on the campus by next spring. All 
tennis players both male and female 
are urged to “talk it up,” for we 
need more people playing tennis in 
this world. 



The Greek letter organizations at 
Auburn have reported a very success- 
ful rushing seaons, which closed re- 
cently. An engineer fraternity, Tau 
Beta Pi, one of the best known and 
largest fraternities in the country, has 
been established. 

— Orange and Blue. 



Sistrunk says he wonders who killed 
the (Bead Sea. 



BASKET RINGERS PRAC- 
TICE 

Yes, it is very early to start basket- 
ball practice, but some of the demons 
of the indoor court are already at 
work on their own “hook.” The 
coach' has not called for basketball 
practice to begin, for we are at pres 
ent making a hard effort to whip a 
football team into shape. However, 
BASKETBALL man, how can it hurt 
you to get out and practice passing 
and throwing goals? If you do not 
look ahead, when the time for basket- 
ball does come, you will not be in 
physical condition to fight it out for 
a place on the team with those men 
who have been out playing football. 
McCormick, Coursey, Poole, and sev- 
eral others of last year’s team have 
been out now for the last few after- 
noons. IF YOU ARE NOT OUT FOR 
FOOTBALL, YOU HAD BETTER 
JOIN THE BASKET RINGERS IN 
PRACTICE. 

A large number of students went to 
the Century Saturday night to see 
Fritz Lieber’s production of “Ham- 
let.”. This was a play well worth the 
seeing, and it is gratifying to note 
that so many of the Millsaps students 
were interested. Their presence there 
swelled a small crowd into a middling 
crowd. 

The State Y. M. C. A. Student Con- 
vention will be held at Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College this year. One hundred 
twenty-five delegates from Kentucky 
colleges will be present. 

— Kentucky Wesleyan. 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN- 
NERS TAKE TRACK 

About eight men are out every after- 
noon getting in shape for the cross 
country run between the Southern 
Methodist colleges which is to be held 
at Emory University in early Decem- 
ber. H. B. Collins and John Ramsey 
of last year’s team are out every after- 
noon making the cinders fly, for they 
fully realize that this year they will 
have to work hard for a position on 
the team that will wear the Purple 
and White colors in Atlanta next De- 
cember, and also that if they win one 
of the coveted places they must make 
a better showing than they did last 
year. 

About six other new men are out 
for this team, but there should be 
others. If there is any man in school 
who can run or has the grit and de- 
termination to train, for it takes train- 
ing above all things to make a dis- 
tance runner, he should report to 
Manager Collins at once and be sup- 
plied with a track suit. Remember 
that, besides the personal glory of 
making the squad and the trip to At- 
lanta, you will he adding glory to 
your college. 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 



Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 
Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 



PREPS LOSE TO MISSIS- 
SIPPI RESERVES 

The Preps journeyed to Vicksburg 
last Thursday for their annual game 
with the Mississippi College Reserves. 
Both teams made the trip at the in- 
vitation of the City of Vicksburg, 
which wished to stage the game as a 
part of the entertainment offered by 
the city to the residents of Warren 
County. Both teams felt honored by 
the invitation, and especially as the 
game Was represented as the chief at- 
traction of the day. 

The Academy squad played well, but 
was unable to score after the first half, 
during the last quarter of which they 
completely worsted their opponents, 
carrying the ball over once and to 
the ten yard line a second time. The 
Reserves made two touchdowns in the 
first period, and one each in the last 
two. The superior playing of Gulley 
and Johnson in the backfield won the 
game for the Reserves. The score 
was 27-6. 



CITY SHOE SHOP 

.-.u/fl? J.;!-.. f 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 



^ J 

^J0H\ c. 

5_ JI " W » 1 • > H ■ 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



THE TIME THAT I SHALL 
LOVE BUT YOU 

I will love you, yes I’ll love you 
Till the birds no longer fly; 

Till the giant trees above you. 

Shall bend their heads and die. 

No mortal span of time can tell, 

No tolling of man’s parting knell 
Can ever begin to measure true 
The time that I shall love hut you. 

I will love you, yes I’ll love you 
Till the desert sands grow cold; 

Till the lions roaming the forest thru. 
Shall no longer be so bold. 

No measurement of fleeting time, 

No conception — even that of mine — 
Can ever begin to measure true 
The time that I shall love but you. 

I will love you, yes I’ll love you 
Till the whole world passes by; 

Till there be no sorrow, joy or pain 
For such as you and I. 

No depth of love that’s e’er been 
known, 

No height by man in airplane flown. 
Can ever begin to measure true 
The time that I shall love but you. 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery- 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 4117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

LOOK! COLLEGE BOYS, LOOK! 

CAMEL CIGARETTS 
15c a Package 

Crescent Billiard Hall 

WEST JACKSON 



CUKY 



“What's weighing on your mind, 
Tom?” 

“Do you think my mind is a pair of 
scales?” 

“Well, no, if you want to be precise 
about it — scales are evenly balanced.” 
— Maroon and White. 




Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. Br 
Mail or Local Classes. Write tmr 
terms and list of successful studemM. 
Associated Art 8tudioe- 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 

■' ■ eMiasefi *«doe-. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




“Eve had the leaf on.” “Yes,” cried 
the Freshman, “and her daughter has 
the leave-off.” 



Prof. Mitchell: “Is there more than 
one kind of cube?” 

Fresh. Saunders: “Yes, sir; there’s 
the DICE, the cube root of the gam- 
bling game." 



Prof: “What was Washington’s 

farewell address?” 

Fresh: “Why, Heaven, I guess.” 



Horace Villee says, “There has al- 
ways been excitement over Rents since 
Eve tore her fig-leaf on a thorn.” 



Lady in Street Car: “Oh, I dropped 
my wig out the window.” 

Galloway: “Never mind lady, there’s 
a switch in the next block.” 



AS SHAKESPEARE SEES IT. 
Freshman: “A Comedy of Errors ” 

Sophomore: “Much Ado About 

Nothing.” 

Junior: “As You Like It.” 

Senior: “All’s Well that Ends Well.” 



Y. M. C. A. NOTES 



At the regular meeting of the Y. M. 
C. A. last week, President Watson gave 
a short but forceful talk on the mean- 
ing and aims of the Y. M. C. A. He 
told of the three-fold aim of the Y. M. 
C. A.— the development of the mind, 
body, and soul. He touched briefly 
upon some of the works of the Y. M. C. 
A., how it was carrying on the work of 
developing the mind and body. He 
said that the Y. M. C. A. was also 
doing a great deal in developing our 
souls but it depended upon us whether 
this was doing us any good. 

After his talk. President Watson 
suggested that the house be open to 
discuss, “My Idea of a Christian.” 
Several good talks were made. 



If a body meet a body 
With a pocket full of rye, 

Should a body treat a body 
When the stuffs so dog-gone high. 



All are glad to learn that Prof. Fer- 
guson’s illness was of short duration, 
and that he is able to be back at his 
duties in the Academy. 



A GREATER MILLSAPS 

(Continued from page 5) 

There are about thirty students for 
the ministry here in Millsaps this 
year — a larger enrollment of minis- 
terial students possibly than ever be- 
fore. When these men finish here 
they must go to Atlanta or Dallas to 
complete their training for the work 
they are to do. There are going to 
be more of such students here in the 
future. Southern Methodism needs 
more trained men for the pulpit and 
it needs more schools in which to 
train them. Millsaps is an ideal lo- 
cation for such a school, being be- 
tween Atlanta and Dallas and with 
the large territory that she could 
serve. Those already in the active 
pastorate in Mississippi and adjoining 
territory need it. 

There should be a strong graduate 
department here. There are fine stud- 
ents who would come to Millsaps if 
they could do graduate work here 
that would carry them farther than 
they can go here now. 

When Millsaps gets these things, 
she will have gone far towards mak- 
ing A GREATER MILLSAPS. We 



can not get all these things now, but 
we can work for them now, and we 
can get some of them now. Some 
one may say that these things are 
only impracticable ideals. I say that 
they are not only ideals, but that 
they are practicable. Millsaps will 
have these things, must have them to 
be the GREATER MILLSAPS we 
want her to be. It is up to us to 
work for these things and to get 
them. 

Let’s go on for a GREATER MILL- 
SAPS. 

A Student. 



Half-pint Coursey: “Dr. Mitchell, is 
a straight line the same everywhere?” 
Bronco: “It is the same here; it is 

the same in Halifax; I have never been 
in Mars; and it is the same in Hades.” 



Mack Swearingen has returned to 
school after his brief absence on ac- 
count of appendicitis. 



Ducky and Prof. Patch acted upon 
Doc Watkins’ suggestion that they at- 
tend the Hallowe’en party at Galloway 
Memorial and meet the Belhaven fac- 
ulty. 






Fresh. Tate: “Gee, but I would like 
to be census.” 

Soph.: “Why?” 

Tate: “Because it embraces over 

18,000,000 women.” 



Prof.: “What are the three words 

used most by Freshmen?” 

Fresh. Brooks: “I don’t know.” 

Prof.: “Correct, sit down.” 



Waits (naming works of Longfel- 
low) : “Evangeline, Hiawatha * * *” 

Clark: “Rave on.” 

Waits: “Raven.” 

SAFETY FIRST. We notice that 
there are a great many more taking 
Chemistry since prohibition. 



The game with the Normal was 
rather long. We notice in last weeks 
paper that Normal made a thirty year 
pass. . 



PROCRASTINATION. Dr. Key says 
that someone has stolen Six Thous- 
and Years of History from the library. 



WHO IS GUILTY? The swing on 
Dr. Watkins front porch is broken 
down. 



After hearing that Mr. Knoblock 
went to the Asylum Sunday, we are 
much relieved to see him back with 
us again. 



Where was Mr. McEwen all last 
week? 



Prof. Harrell: “All liquids tend to 

form spheres. What does a rain drop 
form?” 

Miss Tucker: “Water.” 



We notice a great number of our stu- 
dents are getting grey - — - suits. 



Preacher Watson: “Why did they 

laugh at me when I asked why there 
was no Christmas before Christ was 
born?” 




Why Is Iron Magnetic? 

A horse-shoe magnet attracts a steel needle. But why? 

l We don’t know exactly. We do know that electricity and mag- 
netism are related. 

In dynamos and motors we apply electro-magnetic effects. All our 
power-stations, lighting systems, electric traction and motor drives, 
even the ignition systems of our automobiles, depend upon these 
magnetic effects which we use and do not understand. 

Perhaps if we understood them we could utilize them much more 
efficiently. Perhaps we could discover combinations of metals more 
magnetic than iron. 

The Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company investi- 
gate magnetism by trying to find out more about electrons and their 
arrangement in atoms. 

X-rays have shown that each iron atom consists of electrons grouped 
around a central nucleus— like planets around an infinitesimal sun. 
X-rays enable us to some extent to see into the atom and may at last 
reveal to us what makes for magnetism. 

This is research in pure science, and nothing else. Only thus can real 
progress be made. 

Studies of this kind are constantly resulting in minor improvements. 
But some day a discovery may be made which will enable a metallur- 
gist to work out the formula for a magnetic alloy which has not yet been 
cast, but which will surely have the properties required. Such a result 
would be an achievement with tremendous possibilities. It would 
improve all electric generators, motors, and magnetic devices. 

In the meantime the continual improvement in electrical machinery 
proceeds, in lesser steps. These summed up, constitute the phenom- 
enal progress experienced in the electrical art during the past twenty- 
five years. 



’ 

. We are very much disappointed that 
* Ducky didn’t get any apples ducking. 

it n. • a 2 £ # '• ... 

' ’ 

Bowen: “Why did David gather a 

hand around hint?" s :~ 

Brooks: “Because he was a musi- 

cian.” 



Generalf|Electric 

Company Schenectady, N. 



i V- 



General Office 



I. Y. 

95-453H 




8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Mississippi’s Largest and Most Comfortable 
Theatre 

Don’t Miss Cecil B. DeMille's 

“THE AFFAIRS OF ANATOL” 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



The MAJESTIC 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
CONSTANCE TALMADGE in 

“WEDDING BELLS” 

HAROLD LLOYD COMEDY 



Grand Concert Orchestra Accompanying 
Elaborate Motion Pictures 

Wednesday and Thursday 
DOROTHY DALTON IN 

“BEHIND MASKS” 

FOX SUNSHINE COMEDY 



ISTRIONE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
COMING WEEK 

Monday-Tuesday 
Justine Johnstone in 
“A HEART TO LET” 

Snub Pollard Comedy 

Wednesday-Thursday 
“HOME STUFF” 
with VIOLA-DANA 
Vanity Comedy 



Friday-Saturday 
‘FINE FEATHERS” 
All-Star Cast 



ORCHESTRA 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



Seniors Order Invitations 

The Senior Class has placed the 
order for Commencement invitations 
for this year. A committee composed 
of Miss Ada McDonnell, Miss Nellie ( 
Clark, and H. B. Collins had the selec- 
tion of invitations in charge. These | 
three met with a representative of the ( 
E. A. Wright Company of Philadelphia 
on Monday afternoon, and entered the 
order. 

Sheldon Knight of Mississippi Col- ( 
lege was a visitor here Saturday after- 
noon and night. He was the guest of 1 
several of his friends from McComb. i 

Prof. White reports the loss of an j 
auto tire on Hallowe’en. It is not 
known whether the loss is the result 
of playful pranks or theft. 

— 

John Gainey is back at school after 
a brief absence on account of broken 



Orchestra practice* was postponed 
this week from Tuesday night to the 
same night next week. 

The faculty held its regular meeting 
on Tuesday afternoon. A number of 
petitions were disposed of. 

Dr. Mitchell is undertaking the or- 
ganization of a college chorus to con- 
sist of boys and girls. The purpose is 
to have a group of singers ready to 
take part in all public exercises at the 
college. 

Daley Crawford spent last week-end 
with her sister who lives in Brook- 
haven. 



. Mildred Brashear enjoyed the week- 
end at her home in Vicksburg. 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



DRINK" 



Ihero-Cola 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to . 

J. A. HUBER 



I O. H. Scott spent last Sunday at his 
"home in Fernwood. 

STUDENTS OF EUROPE 
1 IN DISTRESS 

Sherwood Eddy, one of the leaders 
of the Y. M. C. A. in this country, 
who is just back from three months ! 
in Europe, has issued a statement in 
regard to the condition of the students 
of the Old World. He says: 

“Thousands of students in central 
and eastern Europe are suffering and ! 
will continue to suffer through the 
coming winter from cold and hunger, i 
insufficient food and clothing, and j 
from hopeless despair. The students 
of some thirty countries are uniting 
to come to their relief. The Student 
Friendship Fund which is being raised \ 
now by the young men and women in 
the schools of the United States is a 
challenge to fulfill our moral obliga- 
tions to the students of the world. 

“What will be the answer of the 
American college students?” 



MEET ME AT THE 



CRESCENT BILLIARD HALL 

Under New Management Next to New Millsaps Bldg. 

O. S. JOHNSON, Proprietor 




IMPROVED VISION 

The man with impaired eye- 
sight is wanted here. We 
want to show him how real 
optical skill can afford him 
benefit. When the strength 
of vision is sapped by strain 
it is necessary to help Nature. 
That’s what we do. We fit 
glasses Correctly. 



C. R. V. SEUTTER 



OPTOMETRIST 



Century Building 



Jackson, Miss. 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

United States, Hinds County and City Depository 

Capital paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders' liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus earned 225,000.00 

Undivided profits, net 25,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 
at the 

PALACE BILLIARD HALL 



“BARKER BREAD ” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



ENGRAVED - 

WEDDING INVITATIONS— ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CRESTS— CARDS 

MONOGRAMMED STATIONERY FOR LADIES 
BUSINESS STATIONERY 

ONLY ENGRAVING PLANT IN MISSISSIPPI 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Jterjjl? mb Ifyit? 



Vol. XIV. 



QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOV. 11, 1921 



No. 8 



STUDENTS IN "NIGHT 
SHIRT PARADE" 

Orderly Riot Gives Vent to 
Student Enthu- 
siasm 



PRESBYTERIAN MISSION- Panthers and Majors 

ARY LEADS CHAPEL MON. Battle to A Tie 



Great was the excitement and en- 
thusiasm of the Millsaps men after 
the battle last Friday, when the Ma- 
jors stopped the snarling Panthers 
from Birmingham. The best that the 
student body of the college expected 
from the Majors was a good “scrap”, 
and the only hope was that they could 
hold the Panthers to a low score. But 
after the game was over, and a draw- 
game was the best that Birmingham- 
Southern could boast, is it any wonder 
that the men of Millsaps were elated? 

No sooner had the whistle blown at 
the end of the game, than plans were 
formulated for a snake-dance. Cheer- 
Leader Stokes announced that all men 
wishing to take part in the “shirt-tail 
parade” would meet at Galloway Hall 
as soon as supper was over. At seven 
o'clock there was a howling mob as- 
sembled, and such a mob! There werq 
men in pajamas, men in night-shirts, 
and men who, though unable to secure 
garments of this nature, joyously 
flaunted their shirt-tails in the wind. 
The K. K. K. could not compare with 
the Majors this night! 

(Continued, on page 3) 

MILLSAPS BULLETIN 
EXTENSION NUMBER 

Plans for High School De- 
bates Are Announced. 



Dr. Hudson Brings Interest 
ing Message From 
China 

The faculty and students were horn 
ored Monday morning during the 
chapel hour with the presence of Dr. 
W. H. Hudson, who conducted the 
devotional service and then delivered 
a short speech on the situation of 
China today. 

Dr. Hudson took graduate work at 
Princeton University while ex-Presi- 
dent Wilson was president of that in- 
stitution. For many years he has 
been a missionary from the Presby- 
terian Church to China. He is at 
present on a year's leave of absence, 
and is spending that time in visiting 
the Christian institutions of his and 
other Churches. 

In his speech. Dr. Hudson told of 
the high esteem that the Chinese peo- 
ple have for the United States. He 
said that the Chinese have sent 2,500 
students to this country, as compared 
to 250 sent to England and Scotland, 
and 150 sent to France. This shows 
that the ideals of this country are ap- 
preciated by China, and that the Giant 
of the East is trying to imitate us. 

The speaker compared physical man 
to a democracy. Men of all races and 
(Continued on page 3) 



Forward Pass in Third Quarter Scores For Birmingham; 
Tackle Play in Last Quarter, For Purple & White 

The Panthers (as the Birmingham- Neither side showed the necessary 
Southern football team is so properly punch to really advance the ball in 
called) came over from their lair from this quarter, but both seemed to be 
the Smoky City, screaming and tear- putting up great defensive play. Camp- 
ing the ground as if to claw the Mill- bell and McNair upon several occasions 
•saps Majors to pieces. They did, BUT downed the Panther safety, in his 
THEY DID’NT. The Majors with tracks just as he received a punt. 



their backs to the wall fought the 
Panthers to a standstill holding them 
to a tie, 7 to 7. Although out-weighed 
both in the line and backfield, the 
Purple and White line held in the 
critical moments of the game and the 
Alabamians were able to cross the 
Millsaps line but once. This result- 
ed from a beautiful forward pass 



The Panthers resorted nearly en- 
tirely to an over head attack in the 
second period. Everytime the Pan- 
thers had the ball they attempted to 
pass. Miller did the passing for the 
visitors, but with exception of the pass 
that gave Birmingham their score his 
passing was very poor. Out of the 
twenty-six attempted during the en- 



that the Panthers unearthed early in I tire game, they completed only three, 



the third period. With the spread 
out formation on, Miller passes to 
Baker for forty yards; Baker running 
in open field ten yards for a touch- 
down. Baker kicked goal. The Majors 
scored theirs in the last five minutes 
of play when McEwen on a trick tackle 



against three out of nine for the Ma- 
jors. 

Early in the third quarter with the 
ball in midfield, the Panthers sprung 
the pass that saved them from a de- 
feat. The remainder of the quarter 
was taken up with attempts at end 



play went through the Panther line for runs and frequent punts. Galloway 



Correspondence Courses 
Offered 



The November number of the Mill- 
saps College Bulletin is just off the 
press. This issue. Volume IV, number 
4, is given over to the Extension De- 
partment of the college. Dr. S. G. 
Noble, director of this department, 
makes several interesting announce- 
ments and offers good service to va- 
rious groups of people. The nature 
of the contents of the Bulletin may 
be noted from the following heads of 
the sections: 

I. Free high school debate mate- 
rial ; seventy-five questions with ref- 
erences and information. 

II. State and county debating con- 
tests. 

III. Correspondence courses. 

IV. Illustrated lectures. 

V. Helps to teachers and high school 

pupils. 

VI. Circulating Library for minis- 
ters. 

The plans for the State Debating 
Meet to be held at Millsaps next spring 
are well worked up in every detail. 
The Bulletin says: 

“A selected number of accredited 
high schools have been invited to send 
teams to a State Debating Meet to 
be held at Millsaps College in the 
(Continued on page 2) 



FOOTBALL SONG CON- 
TEST COMES TO END 

Student Body Pass Final 
Judgment at Chapel 
Tuesday 



seven yards and touchdown. 

The ball stayed in midfield during 
the first quarter, neither side ever 
threatening to score. Both sides re- 
sorted to frequent passes but very few 



and Carr (ME & YOU) occasionally 
reeled off end runs that netted some 
yardage, while Musselwhite plowed 
through the line several times for 
good gains. The whole Millsaps line 



were completed, both Coaches having played hard football both on the de- 



their teams well trained on breaking fense and offense, 
up the aerial attack. Stovall and Mil- 
ler engaged in a punting duel with 
Miller having the edge on’ Stovall. 



The last quarter began with the 
ball in midfield. Galloway tried to 
(Continued on page 6) 



Y, W. C. A. HOLDS 



The contest for the selection of a 
football song has at last come to an 
end. Tuesday morning the two best 
songs submitted were sung to the 
student body by the Glee Club, and 
the students then voted for the final 
selection. The two songs had pre- 
viously been picked out by a com- 
mittee from a group of about twenty 
entries. 

The winning song was composed by 
Miss Alee Patee, and sung to the tune 
of “Rah for the Black and Blue.” The 
other song, which is to be used at 
the games along with the winner, was 
composed by Miss Ruby McClellan, 
and is sung to the tune of “Margie.” 
Dr. Mitchell, who presided at the 
meeting for the final selection, very 
graciously presented the prize to the 
winner. 

The two songs are printed below: 
“RAH FOR THE PURPLE & WHITE' 
Come forth ye football heroes, 

Come forth unto the fray. 

Play nobly from the start, boys. 

Make Millsaps win today. 

Rush forward with the ball, boys. 
Touchdown with all your might. 

For while you play we’re shouting. 
Hurrah for the Purple- White. 

(Continued on page 7) 



MAJORS MEET GOAT 
HALE & CD., TODAY 



Sale of Sandwiches On Sat- Mississippi College takes the 



urdav Will be Con- 
tinued 



Field Todav as Choice, 
But ? 



“Backward, turn backward, 

0 Time, if you may; 

Make me a kid again 
Just for today.” 

This proved to be the slogan for 
every girl who was present at the 
weekly meeting of the Y. W. C. A. 
last Thursday. After the reading of 



The Purjile and White line will seek 
to danvdp the great Baptist flood that 
has^swept everything this season be- 
fore it except the hardy Farmers 
from Mississippi A. & M. The Tulane 
Greenies are among the strong teams 
that have been crushed by the flood 
from Clinton. The Choctaws and Ma- 
jors will fight it out this afternoon on 



the minutes and the roll call, the presi- the field at the State Fair Grounds. 



dent "held a short business session in 
which it was decided to continue the 
sale of sandwiches and candy at the 
Hut on Saturday mornings. The As- 
sociation also decided to send five dol- 
lars to help pay the expenses of this 
district’s undergraduate field represen- 
tative to St. Louis, where a conference 
is to be held. Announcements about 
the athletic clubs were also made. 

The following program was ren- 
! dered. all the girls having previously 
[ been told to assume a childish atti- 
tude and recall the “days of long 
ago (?)”: 

Song: “Open the Doors for the 

Children”, by the entire group. 

Scripture reading: “Suffer the little 

children to come unto me”, and suc- 
(Continued on page 3) 



A great crowd is expected to attend 
the game, since today is Armistice 
Day and has been declared a National 
Holiday by the President of these 
United States. 

The Choctaws have a great team. 
Nobody has gotten their “Goat” yet. 
Without a doubt Capt. Hale is one of 
the greatest football players in the 
South, and the Editor of Athletics of 
the Purple and White gives him his 
vote for half on the ALL SOUTHERN 
FOOTBALL ELEVEN. The Choctaws 
also have some other football players 
besides Hale, but he is the star that out 
shines them all. They are going to 
be hard to stop. They were last year, 
for last year they piled up a sixty to 
nothing score against us. This year it 
is not going to be so easy. We have a 
(Continued on page 6) 




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SOUTHWESTERN UNIV., AS 
SEEN BVMILLSAPSGRAD.i 



W. B. Gates ’18 Writes of 
Experiences as English 
Professor 

To the Editor of the Purple and White: 

Thinking that some of the readers 
of the Purple and White might be in 
terested in Millsaps’ sister school in 
the state of Texas, Southwestern Uni- 
versity, I venture to give a few of my 
own impressions of this institution. 
In explanation of my presence here, 

I may say that I was appointed to an 
instructorship in the English Depart- 
ment of Southwestern for the year 
1921-22, and began work on Septem- 
ber 27. 

The phrase “ideally situated”, trite 
though it may be, seems to me to be 
most fittingly applied to Southwestern 
University. The little city of George- 
town, with a population of four thou- 
sand, has grown up about the college 
and has received its impress, as shown 
by the number of refined, Christian 
citizens who have been attracted here 
by the educational and religious ad- 
vantages. Southwestern is now in its 
forty-ninth year, a school old enough 
to have traditions by which new stu- 
dents are inspired to higher ideals. 
All the university buildings are im- 
posing structures of white limestone, 
with the exception of the Science 
Building, which has been recently 
completed; it is built of brick and is 
said to be one of the most modern and 
completely equipped science buildings 
in the Southwest. The university has 
quite an advantage over Millsaps in 
its accommodations for young women. 
The Womans Building or “Annex”, as 
the students familiarly speak of it, is 
a splendid dormitory for girls* The 
students in this building are under 
the careful supervision of the Dean 
of Women. A great many young wom- 
en are attracted here by the excep- 
tional advantages in music and ex- 
pression. The Fine Arts Department 
has a separate building for its work, 
which is a distinct part of the uni- 
versity. Students may pursue courses 
in the Fine Arts Department at the 
same time they are working for their 
academic degree, or may register sim- 
ply as “Fine Arts Specials”. 1 

Athletics at Southwestern is unfler 
the supervision of W. J. Gardner, an 
All-American end from Carlisle. The 
football team has had a rather ha~d 
schedule up to the present, but in spite 
of the fact that we have suffered sev- 
eral defeats, we are not at all dis- 
couraged. Southwestern always has 
an excellent basketball team and this 
year the prospects are especially good 

I find my work here very interesting 
and quite pleasant. We have seven 
sections of Freshman English to ac- 
commodate the large number of fresh- 
men. I teach four of these sections 
and one section of Sophomore Eng- 
lish. There are two other men in the 
English faculty and in addition each 
of us has a student assistant who 
grades some of the themes and other 
written work. This relieves us of a 
great deal of very tiresome work. My 
hours are from eight to eleven-thirty 
on five days of the week. There are 
no classes on Monday. 

With hest wishes to Millsaps, her 
faculty, students, and alumni, I am. 
Faithfully yours, 

W. B. GATES, '18. 

j P. O. Box 71, 

Georgetown, Texas. 



Millsaps Bulletin 

Extension Number 

(Continued from page 1) 
spring of 1922. High schools eligible 
to compete in such contest, not having 
received an invitation to participate 
in this meet, are requested to commu- 
nicate with the Director of the Exten- 
sion Department without delay. Mill- 
saps is prepared to take responsibility 
for the meet, to provide free entertain- 
ment for visiting teams and to furnish 
an appropriate award to the winning 
team. 

“Millsaps College Library will also 
provide debating materials to be used 
in preparation for the contest.” 

The plan for offering correspondence 
courses to certain classes of students 
is novel. It was first introduced here 
last year. The Bulletin explains the 
plan for these courses in full: 

“In response to the demand for col- 
lege instruction through correspond- 
ence the Extension Department of 
Millsaps College herewith announces a 
number of correspondence courses open 
to students on and after October 1, 
1921. The courses are to be given by 
the regular members of the College 
faculty. Students will be placed in 
direct communication with the pro- 
fessors and will be given as close 
supervision as circumstances permit. 
Each course will be the equivalent of 
a three-hour college course pursued 
for a quarter of the college year, and 
will be credited as one year-hour to- 
ward the B.A. and B.S. degrees. 

“These courses will .appeal to several 
classes of students: 

“(1) Those who have been forced 
to drop out cf college, and who wish 
to continue their college courses out 
of residence. 

“(2) School teachers, either grad- 
uates or undergraduates, who wish t> 
fulfill the requirements of the Board 
of Examiners for State or Professional 
License. 

“(3) Preachers who wish to improve 
themselves while in service. 

“(4) Prospective college students 
who wish to secure advanced credit 
before entering college.” 

It is planned for illustrated lectures 
on scientific subjects to be made avail- 
able to the people of the state. Prof. 
G. L. Harrell is to offer a lecture on 
“Astronomy”; and Dr. J. M. Sullivan 
is to present a series dealing with in- 
dustrial chemistry and its relation to 
the natural resources of the state. 

The library service offered to tha 
ministers of the state is a great thing. 
There are many useful books in the 
Carnegie-Millsap3 Library that are not 
to be found in the small towns of the 
state. There is no reason why the 
preachers should not have access t< 
them here. 

Spirit. 

College spirit! How often we hear 
this phrase, and in how many differ- 
ent connections. Not a man of us but 
loves the words and the thing for 
which they stand. Yet who could give 
a definition of this spirit? It is an 
indefinable something, something 
without which a college would cease 
to be a living force and become merely 
an institution of learning, and yet 
something which we cannot fully un- 
derstand. A spirit which does not 
seek to protect the name of its college 
in any place and at all times is of lit- 
tle worth. No matter how wonderful 
an exhibition of pluck and gameness a 
football player may put up, or how 
splendidly a student may have sup- 
ported his team, if he leaves the field 
and by his rowdyism and misconduct 
brings his student body into ill repute, 
there is something lacking in his loy- 
alty. — The Davidsonian. 




3 



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Presbyterian Missionary 

Leads Chapel 

(Continued from page 1) 
conditions are practically equal in 
physical strength and in stature. 
Mental man. he compared to a repub- 
lic. A group of trained leaders do the 
thinking for the rest of the world. 
College men and women are being pre- 
pared to become members of that 
group. Spiritually, mankind is an 
empire. We are to look to One Source 
for all leadership and guidance. 

The picture of China's condition of 
Spiritual poverty gave the speaker an 
opportunity to focus his message. He 
made the students understand what 
must be done if China is to be proper- 
ly guided in its reawakening. The 
burden is upon Christians everywhere. 



Y. W. C. A. Holds 

“Childish” Program 

(Continued from page 1) 
ceeding verses from St. Mark 

Prayer: "Now I Lay Me Down to 

Sleep". 

Solo: “Jesus Loves Even Me", by 

"Little” Mildred Brashear. 

Talk: “My First Day at Sunday 

School", by Nellie Clark. 

Talk: “My First Day at School”, 

by Dorothy Carroll. 

Talk: “My Favorite Games”, by 

Anna Belle Craft. 

Song: “Jesus Wants Me for a Sun- 

beam”, by everybody. 

Lesson: Given by the president, 

Daley Crawford, who made the point 
that, whereas we had a spirit of rever- 
ence, willingness to serve, enthusiasm, 
friendliness, play, and forgiveness 
when we were happy children, we 
ought to keep and develop that same 
spirit — now that we are merely 
“grown-up children” — and use it to 
advantage in our Y. W. C. A. en- 
deavor. 

The meeting closed after the girls 
had repeated in unison the verse of 
scripture that has been adopted as the 
motto of the National Y. W. : “I am 

come that ye might have life, and 
that ye might have it more abund- 
antly.” 



GREENWICH VILLAGE 
PARTY 

Mu Chapter of Kappa Delta Sorority 
entertained their college friends at a 
Greenwich Village party on November 
first at the “Black Cat." The gym 
had been converted into a most at- 
tractive Black Cat tea room, the Green- 
wich Village motif being carried out 
in the most minute details. 

The Hallowe'en spirit was in evi- j 
dence in the amusement of the even- ! 
ing. First, the guests went through 
the “Chamber of Horrors,” and, in 
truth, it caused one to have a spooky 
feeling. Then, there was a suit case 
race, in which Miss Pauline Wills was 
given an appropriate gift for her swift 
ness. Prof. Harrell was the winner in 
the Cheshire Cat Grinning Contest. 
Then came the "Famous Ghost Walk.” 
The ghosts of Eve, George Washing- 
ton, Napoleon, Joan of Arc, Queen 
Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh, and 
Betsy Ross appeared, and there was 
much merriment guessing just whose 
ghost was present. 

. Sandwiches, drinks and candy were 
served. The guests lingered in happy 
conversation until a late hour; and it 
was with regret that good nights were 
said. 



Horseshoe pitching is one of the new 
sports at Iowa State College. A meet- 
ing has been scheduled with Drake 
College and contests with other schools 
are to be arranged. — The Teaser. 



Students in Night- 

Shirt Parade 

( Continued from page 1) 

Soon the stirring call of a bugle 
broke in upon the yelling men, and 
Stokes marshalled the men in line, 
led by John Ramsey. "Forward” was 
given, and the “snake” began to crawl, 
soon arriving at the home of Dr. Wat- 
kins, where fifteen snappy RAHS we.e 
given for the president. Then the 
line of march was resumed, passing 
by the main building and on to the 
Academy building. A detail was dis- 
patched at this time to “lean on” the 
lever that rings the big bell behind 
the Chapel, and its resounding peals 
split the stillness of the night. Some 
men who had not rallied to the first 
call then came running, to join in the 
celebration. At the Academy, fresh 
recruits swelled the ranks, and the 
human snake again began to move on- 
ward. At the State Street entrance to 
the campus, Coach Freeland and his 
wife in their car, were encountered ; 
and the “snake” paused to give ring- 
ing cheers to the man who made the 
victory possible — E. Y. Freeland, the 
BEST coach in the land! 

Then the men. about two hundred 
strong, marched over the hill to give 
their fair friends at Belhaven a chance 
to rejoice with them. The wooded 
area 'round about rang with the chant 
of the marching students — “Your Pep, 
your pep!” The “snake” soon reached 
Belhaven, and coiled — but not to strike. 
Stokes and Villee led the cheering, 
which was answered enthusiastically 
by the girls assembled. But lest there 
be sticks and stones cast upon its head 
(as is ever the way with mankind) 
the “snake” moved on, and joyously 
wended its way down North State 
street to Capitol, and then down past 
the Governor’s Mansion, and on west- 
ward to the Edwards Hotel. 

Here the guests of the hotel were 
treated to an idea of just what kind 
of students there are at Millsaps, and 
many were impressed with the “order 
ly riot” that was created. From the 
Edwards House, the “snake” made its 
way to the Union Station, and from 
there back up Capitol street to the 
Istrione Theatre. No cheering was 
done in the picture-show, as the men 
did not desire to disturb the patron -- 
too much. Then the line of joyou.: 
men wended its way into the Roya! 
Hotel, and on through the Pantaz : 
Some idea of the size of this human 
snake can be gained from the fact 
that the head was out of the Pantaze 
and moving on up the street, while the 
tail was just entering the Royal. 

From this time on, the “snake” did 
not visit any more places but was con 
tent to crawl on up Capitol stre t. 
turning in at West street, and ma' in 
| its way back to its “nest”. During the 
I sojourn of the monster reptile within 
the city proper, traffic was slowed 
down considerably; but those incon- 
venienced were more than glad to al- 
low it to have its way. It was an 
evening of "riotous fun” for all those 
taking part in the parade, as well as 
for those who were treated to the 
spectacle of a group of "dignified” 
college students indulging in a “shirt- 
tail ramble". All men taking part in 
the parade are to be complimented, not 
only for the demonstration of their 
loyalty to Millsaps but also for the 
admirable way in which they followed 
their Cheer-Leader’s advice — that ail 
conduct themselves in a gentlemanly 
manner as befitting real Millsaps men. 



The best of living is loving, but 
| the test of loving is living. — Virginia 
i Tech. 



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Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 

Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 

SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON. MISS. 

Four scholarships of $125 each are 
being offered by the University of 
North Carolina this year, made possi 
ble through the generosity of Mr. L. 
S. Holt, Jr— The Tar Heel. 

First Co-ed: “Did you go to see 

Macbeth last night?” 

Second Co-ed: “No — and what's 

more, I don't run after men." — The 
Crimson-White. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. I) O X E Y 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Md 



iiiiiiiiiiiaimiiiiiiiiuiiimuiiiit]iiuiiiimic« 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Pounded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 



One Subscription J 1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 



Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. ' 



STAFF 






Walter Stokes 
















_.J. W. Sells 






REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, 
L. Villee. 


Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
A. L. Joyner. D. F. McNeil, H. 


MANAGEMENT 


H. B. Collins 








G. K. Hebert 






NOVEMBER THE ELE 

The most glorious day that America 1 
was the eleventh of November, nineteen hi 
tory is wonderful under any circumstance 


VENTH 

las known for many years 1 
indred and eighteen. Vic- 
;s, but when it marks the | 



end of a bloody and wasteful struggle it is doubly satisfying. That j 
date was the time of the Armistice that marked the end of the Great 
War. America went into the fight with full vigor and will, and the 
unstinted effort brought an unquestioned victory. It is proper that 
such a day of victory should be celebrated by the American people. 

But there is more than a mere exultation to be manifested on such 
an occasion. The achieving of the victory required the sacrifice of I 
thousands of lives. We must remember the sacrifice made by those 
heroes ; and in so remembering we will turn our celebration into a holy 
commemoration. That is the true form that the Armistice Day holi- 
day should take. 

In meeting together on this date, we also have another purpose. 
We need to pledge anew our loyalty to the United States. When 
good citizens think again on the great deeds that wore performed in 
’17 and ’18, they cannot help but renew their patriotism. It is well 
that we make some show of our feelings toward our country occasion- 
ally, in order that thr national spirit of accomplishment may con- 
tinue to grow. 

On Armistice Day, we are ready to state that we do not want 
another war. but we are just as ready to make it known that if one j 
should become neeassarv we are more than willing to sacrifice in its \ 
winning. 

— 

FOOTBALL REMARKS 

The game with Birmingham-Southern on last Friday was ex- 






* 



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t re me tv satisfying to Millsaps College supporters. Of course, it 
would have been better if we had won the game instead of merely 
tieing the score. But we are proud of the way our team fought 
through the struggle, handicapped as it was. The Panthers had ex- 
pected an easy victory, but they were badly disappointed. The game 
has brought good fame to the Purple team and therefore we feel very 
much elated. 

Now. we meet Mississippi College today. The Choctaw team is 
good, but we know that we can give them a hard fight. We intend 
to do that too. After the game last week, the public may know that 
today’s contest will be hard fought. 

TO THE ALUMNI 

The Purple and White wishes to publish articles from alumni of 
the school. Several graduates have sent in material already this 
year, but we want to get more. The present students are glad to 
hear what the former students are doing, what they think of Millsaps 
today, and what they thought of Millsaps when they were here. 

You alumnus, write what you think about your school and send it 
in. We want your viewpoint. 

SONNET TO ’S SMILE The smile is not confined to just 

She smiles in such a lovely way Her lips and teeth and dimpled 

That it makes me feel rich; and cheeks; 

when Her chin and eyes, they also must 

She brings her dimples into play Aid in that smile, which, alas, never 

I have to say “Do it again.” seeks 

Her ruby lips when thus outspread To flash on me, who its willing slave 
Showing her ivories keen would be 

Would knock most anybody dead; If a little of its brilliance fell on 
Their like has ne’er been seen. 



I 1 

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for College Men 

Harris ’ 



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in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 



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1 218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Jackson, Miss. 



Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL. Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES. WOODENWARE, 
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Telephone 106 

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THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



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When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
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famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

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suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
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WRIGLEYS 




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The Flavor Lasts! 



Friends, students, faculty— 

Our team is going to play. 

On Friday, today, at the Fair Ground. 
Twill be a holiday. 

Be sure to wear your colors. 

And help the team along. 

Let’s “mop up” with the Choctaws; 
Let’s be 300 strong! 

Get all your pep together. 

And show our Majors fine, 

Afillsaps will stand together 
Fach time they “hit that line!” 



OC<XXXOCOC<XXXXX)OOOOOOOOOD 

OPEN FORUM 

OOtXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXiOOOOCXXiO 

Are the Co-eds Cooperating 
With the Y. W. C. A.— 
Their Only College 
Activity ? 

The Y. W. C. A. has a large mem- 
bership but it has not been quite so 
fortunate in securing a good attend- 
ance at its meetings. The time of 
meeting is a problem that is difficult 
to solve. We believe that we have se- 
lected the time that has the fewest 
objections and we wish to make a plea 
to the girls to make the necessary 
sacrifices to attend the meetings. 
When we remember our high pur- 
poses and realize that this is our only 
opportunity for organized activity — 
can we not attend once a week even 
though we miss our dinner on that 
day? 

A CO-ED. 



Learning For Learning’s 
Sake 



How should the world be able to 
distinguish a Millsaps graduate from 
those who have not had nor taken ad- 
vantage of an opportunity for a col- 
lege education? Of course, we expect 
to be better informed and more mature 
in thought than the average man. 
We do the required work with vary- 
ing degrees of excellence and we 
breathe a sigh of relief in thinking 
of those past hours of work inflicted 
upon us by merciless Profs. They 
seem to think, anyway, that we are 
delighted with the privilege of trans- 
lating endless pages of French or 
Latin and that such subjects as Logic, 
Physics, and Analytics are pleasures 
that every one should appreciate. 
Most of us will admit that this is 
hardly the feeling we hold towards 
these highly-respected subjects. On 
the contrary they are regarded in 
j many cases as -bitter medicine to be 
taken in small doses before going to 
bed. 

In class, is our chief aim to find out 
all we can about the lessons asking 
questions if necessary — or is it to put 
up a “bluff” that will make everyone 
! think we are an authority on the sub- 
ject? We cannot fool them always and 
I in the meantime gain anything by 
such methods. If we would be schol- 
ars, we must pay the price in years of 
hard study, for this is something 
which money cannot buy. 

Suppose one of us should go into 
! a store to buy some merchandise. The 
two essentials that we would be con- 
i cerned about would be quality and 
price. After satisfying ourselves that 
j the former was of the best, then we 
I would turn our attention to price. 

] Then some of us might try to “jew” 
the merchant down and all of us would 
want as much as possible for our mon- 
ey. Let us apply this to our schooling. 
We know our quality of learning is 
of the best; then by what strange 
methods of learning do we arrive at 
the conclusion that it is dangerous to 
imbibe too much of it? On the con- 
trary “A little learning is a dangerous 
thing.” Are we going to get as much 
as possible for our fathers’ money and 
are we anxious to get as much as 
possible from each Professor’s store- 
house of learning? If we are lazy, 
indifferent or coming to college for 
another purpose than to learn, it ought 
not to be hard to decide why we make 
bad grades. 

To realize our ambitions, each of us 
should work our hardest towards giv- 
ing our minds the proper food to 
(Continued on page 7) 



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WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

| Property of Athletic Association 

Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

illinium imnmiiimmai!iiiiiinii[]im$ 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.8. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



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j Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. { 

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&3UU+ 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




Panthers and Majors 

Battle to a Tie 

(Codtinued from page 1) 
gain around end; Musselwhite ham- 
mered the line, but he hit a stone 
wall, for the Panthers were fighting 
hard to hold their margin of one 
touchdown. The ball went over on 
downs. Then three times the Majors 
broke up the visitors attempts to pass. 
Then Miller punted to Galloway, who 
returned the ball eighteen yards by 
some good broken field running. End 
runs again failed to gain any ground, 
but a beautiful pass, Galloway to Carr, j 
netted sixteen yards. Carr was then 
sent around right end for four yards, j 
This put the ball on the five yard 
line. McEwen carried the ball over 
on a trick tackle play. While the 
spectators held their breath, Gallo- 
way kicked a perfect goal that gave I 
the Majors a tie that was really a 
victory. 

The game ended with the ball in 
Millsaps territory and the Panthers j 
trying to complete a pass that would 
keep them from a defeat by a much 
more jnexperienced and lighter team. 

We hate to mention any IFS, but 
if Fowler. Reeves, and Culley had been 
in the game, WE WONDER. How- 
ever, the men who played in their po- 
sitions played great football. 

Every man on the line scrapped 
every minute of the play. Several [ 
times Honeycut broke through, and 
threw' the Panther halves for losses. 
The tackling of the entire team was 
exceptionally good, Jimmy Campbell , 
and Musselwhite doing the brunt of 
the tackling work. There were no 
stars for the Majors. Gandy, left 
tackle, and Rogers, left halfback, did 
good work for the visitors, while 
Baker at end was the hero of the 
Birmingham outfit. 

THE LINE-UP. 



Birmingham 

Ellis 


(7) 

L. E. 


Millsaps (7) 
McNair 




L. T 


Stovall 




L. G 


Honeycut 


Stewart 


C 


Windham 


Hall 


R. G 


Davenport 




R. T 


McEwen 




R. E 


Campbell 


Miller 


Q 


Galloway 




L. H 


Carr 




R. H 


Young 


Griffin 


Full 


.Musselwhite 


Touchdowns — Millsaps. 


McEwen; 


Birmingham. 


Baker. 





Substitutes — Birmingham, Maybrich 
for Green, Richardson for Ellis, and J. 
Gandy for Richardson. Millsaps — 
Tate for Young (J. W.); Leon Young 
for McNair; Young (J. W.) for Tate; 
Brooks for Leon Young. 

Officials — Caylor, Mississippi Col- 
lege, Referee; Lloyd, Mississippi A. & 
M., Umpire; Mosely, U. of Miss., Head 
Linesman. 

Officials of Vassar College tonight 
announced that the registration list 
for the class entering in. September, , 
1925, ha3 been closed four years and 
seven months in advance of entrance. 
Vassar admits only about 230 students 
as Freshmen each year, and already 
five hundred have regularly applied 
for admission in 1925. There are at 
present about 5.000 names on the ad- 
vance enrollment lists, including chil- 
dren registered by their parents, at 
birth. — Mt. Holyoke. 



PREPS PLAY IN VICKS-! 
BURG 

| 

The Preps go to Vicksburg today I 
for the second time this season. They ' 
will meet there the Chamberlain Hunt 
Academy team. This team played the 
College last year, and the Preps hope 
to defeat them by a greater score than 
that made by the College in last year’s 
game. 

Both teams are making the trip at 
the invitation of the City of Vicks- 
burg, which has planned a great cele- 
bration for Armistice Day. The foot- 
ball game will be one of the chief 
features of the entertainment, and the 
Academy students feel honored by the ' 
invitation. 

ACADEMY VS GULF 
COAST 

The Academy football squad had 
their annual clash with Gulf Coast 
Military Academy last Saturday, at 
Gulfport. The game was one of the 
best played this season; in fact the 
Preps refer to it as the cleanest, 
hardest fought, most thrilling game 
they have ever played. 

In the first half, the Cadets did 
their best playing, carrying the ball 
over twice and holding their op- 
ponents scoreless. In the third quar- 
ter fortune changed for the Preps. 

In a fake play, Capt. Nelson pretended 
a right end run, giving the ball in 
passing to the right half, Kornegay, , 
who circled left end for thirty yards 
and a touchdown. In the next period. 
Berry, left end for the Preps, received 
a pass, and crossed the line for a 
second touchdonw. By this play the 
score was tied, 13-13, and remained 
thus until the last ten seconds of the 
play, when the Cadets by a series of 
line plunges, carried the ball for a 
doubtful touchdown. The official 
score was 13-20. 

Capt. Nelson, who played with his 
'sual skill and coolness, was forced 
to withdraw in the third period be- 
cause of the loss of a tooth and severe 
bleeding caused thereby. Jimmie 
Kornegay and Gaston Hughes did ex- 
cellent work for the Preps in the back 
field. Hughes made a number of bril- 
liant gains through a heavily ob- 
structed field. 

Birmingham Southern 

Game As Seen By a Co-ed 



Well to start with. Jack and I got 
there late, but we didn’t miss any- ' 
thing as neither side had scored. 
Now I will have to admit that I don't 
know much about football and Jack I 
wouldn’t answer all my questions so 1 
J may get a few things wrong. 

One side lined up and the other 1 
side scattered out, then the man on 
our side kicked the ball and one of 
their men got it. Then a man falls 1 
under him and he stops and the 
referee picks up the ball and looks 
at it and puts it back down; then Mr. 
Stovall kicks it and they kick it back 
until they get tired and start running 
and throwing. Then they say a quar- 
ter is up and the men rest. I almost 
forgot to tell you that the idea is to 
get the ball over the others goal lin > 
Well, now they start again. “Red” i 
makes a fine run and our man passes ; 
to one of their men and he runs a 




IMPROVED VISION 

The man with impaired eye- 
sight is wanted here. We 
want to show him how real 
optical skill can afford him 
benefit. When the strength 
of vision is sapped by strain 
it is necessary to help Nature. 
That’s what we do. We fit 
glasses Correctly. 



C. R. V. SEUTTER 



OPTOMETRIST 



Century Building 



Jackson, Miss. 



LOOK! College Bovs LOOK! 

CAMEL CIGARETTES 

15c a Package 

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Wholesale Grocer 



Feed Manufacturer 



(old Storage 



Jackson, Miss. 



while until someone persuades «him to 
stop. 

About this time they said that the 
half was up and I let Jack go out and 
get in the parade as there was a real 
cute boy back of me I wanted to see. 
Then they started playing again and 
in a little while they kick to our man 
and he kicks it a little way and falls 
down and a few others do the same 
and then they get the ball and make 
a score. But we are used to that and 
so we yell and then we get close to 
their goal and Mr. MpEwen, goes over 
and they don't even try to stop him. 
Then we kick and tie the score and 
the time is up. 

I think that it was grand, as some 
of our best looking men were not 
playing. 

They had their men numbered so 
they would know where to play, but 
that didn’t help them any, and ours 
could remember where they belonged. 

P. S. We are going to play “Goat” 
Hale next week, but Jack says he isn’t 
going to take me as I ask too many 
questions. 

Majors Meet “Goat” Hale 

& Company Today 

(Continued from page 1) 
team that will scrap, a team that has 
been well coached, and a student body 
that will support the team to the last. 
Yes, it is going to be a great fight. 
It is a rather significant fact that the 
Mississippi College - Millsaps battle 
should be staged on Armistice Day. 

The team is ready, having worked 
hard this past week. Fowler and Cul- 
ley are back in the line up. This will 
strengthen the whole team consider-j 
ably. The student body is all PEPPEDj 
for the occasion. Owing to the fact- 



CITY SHOE SHOP 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 
Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

I Ms J. WALTHALL, Prop. 



„ i, JEWE tER'i . 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICII & CO. 






Comics, Cartons, Commercial News 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 

that we are Methodist, it is thought 
that we shall try an overhead attack, 
i. e„ sprinkle them with passes. 

Onward Millsaps. 

Casper W. Avery of Swiftown was 
a visitor here last Thursday. He was 
the guest of J. F. Hudson and F. E. 
Ballard. 



‘ v-- 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 







COMIC 



He — "Do you like indoor sports?” 
She — “Yes, but father won’t let them j 
stay late.” 

Aleck — “Is Mr. Williams indis- 

posed?” 

Watson — “No sir, he is in the bed.” 



Modesty — Stokes says he would like 
to see the co-eds with ribbon or some= 
thing on their arms. 



Clerk — “What size toothbrush do 
you want?” 

Black — “You had better give me a 
big one; I have a large family.” 



Sharbrough (explaining problem at 
board) — “And if I hadn't have made 
a mistake I would have gotten it 
right.” 



Dr. Key — “We want clean sports 
here.” 

Co-ed — “Why not introduce swim- 
ming?” 



Drunk — “Do you see me?” 

Lady — “Yes, I see you.” 

Drunk — “Have you ever seen me 
before?” 

Lady — “No, I have never seen you 
before.” 

Drunk — “Well, how do you know 
this is me then?” 



Dr. Noble — “What is marginal de- 
sirability?” 

McNeil — “That's when you get all 
you can hold.” 



Dr. Watkins — “Would you care to 
join us in the new Missionary move- 
ment?” 

Fresh. Brooks — “I’m crazy to try it 
if it is anything like the toddle or the 
fox-trot.” 



Dr. Bowen — “There seems to be a 
lack of enterprising young men. Why, 
I remember the time when it was a 
common thing for a young man to 
start out as a clerk and in a few 
years own the business.” 

Fitzhugh — “Yes, but cash registers 
have been invented since that time.” 

Prof. Mitchell — “Shanks, explain 
this proposition so that the most ig- 
norant can understand it.” 

Shanks — “What part of it is not 
clear to you?” 



He failed in Latin, flunked in Geom; 

They heard him softly hiss, 

I’d like to find the man who said 
That ignorance is bliss. 

Prof. Sanders — “Why was Caesar 
so eminently successful?” 

Co-ed — “Probably because he had 
spch a lot of Gaul.” 



Dad — “Do you want a hair cut?” 
Nelson — "No I want them all. cut.” 
Dad — “Any particular way?” 

Nelson — “Yes, off.” 

(Now we see why he is afraid of 
Squirrels.) 



A SOFT REBUKE 
Scene — Ducky’s History room. 
Time— 1:05 P. M. 

Shuffling of feet, rattle of coins, 
signs of “Let’s Go.” 

Ducky (wearily) “Just a moment, 
gentlemen. I have a few pearls to 

cast.” 



Blank — “Give me some oyster soup.” 
Waiter — “With or without oysters?” 

Dr. Sullivan — “If H20 is water, 
what is CH20?” 

Sophomore — “Sea water.” 



I R. H. M. — “Wish I was a Prof.” 

J Fresh— "Why?” 

R. H. — "So everybody would laugh 
when I told a joke.” 



Ducky might have said, "If water 
rots your boots, what will it do to 
your stomach?” 



Any Co-ed who has an open date in 
the next few weeks will please notify 
Freshman Watson. 



Learning For Learning’s 
Sake 

(Continued from page 5) 
make them strong and vigorous. Yet 
there is a higher reason why we I 
should give ourselves to hard study. . 
Our college spirit should compel us 
to do our best. What we want and 
should have above everything else is 
a reputation for Scholarship, that will | 
be nation-wide. We are proud of what 
has already been accomplished along 
this line but we want each student to 
feel his responsibility. Millsaps suf- 
fers or gains by what each of us does. ] 
Then let everyone cast aside the old ( 
ideas of “getting by” and make Mill- 
saps known far and wide as a school 
whose students are earnest, patient 
seekers after learning for learning’s 
sake. 



Football Song Contest 

Comes to End 

(Continued from page 1) 

( Chorus. ) 

Rah! for the Purple, 

Rah! for the White, boys 
Hurrah! for Millsaps, rah! 

We’re right here to back you. 

None can defeat you, 

| Hurrah! for Millsaps. Rah! Rah! Rah! 
— 

“MILLSAPS MAJORS” 

(Tune of Margie) 

Our football Majors, 
j We know you'll hit that line hard, 
Majors — 

Just watch our Majors scoring. 

We will fight with all of our might. 
We’ll catch step, 

We’ve got the pep, 

1 We’ll make a rep. 

For Millsaps, 

You are the best of teams — 
j Show your grit and fight— 

I After you’ye made that wide end run. 
J And this football game is won, 

Then cheer for the Purple and White. 



j PROF. LIN CONDUCTS TEACHERS 
TRAINING CLASS. 



The Bowen Teachers Training Class ; 
met Sunday in the Galloway hall with 
an attendance of twenty-two. 

On account of the absence of the 1 
teacher. Prof. Bowen, Prof. Lin taught I 
the class. The subject of the lesson 
was “Growth”, and the different stages 
in the growth of the child were dis- j 
cussed. This was made especially in- ! 
teresting by the teacher’s knowledge 
of children, he having been connected 
with the public schools for a number j 
of years. The difference in growth 
and development was clearly brought 
out by illustrations, and the conditions 
which tend for growth in the right 
direction were discussed. 

The meeting was then turned over 
to the president, who expressed his 
thanks to Prof. Lin and attended to 
several business affairs. The roll was 
then called and the class dismissed 
with the class watchword. 




BOYHOOD’S GOLDEN DAYS 



O'er mem’ry’s road I travel back. 
To boyhood’s golden days; 

On mem’ry’s ship I sail me back, 
To childhood’s happy ways. 

I see the house upon the hill 
Where joyful days were spent; 

I see the one whose smile did fill 
Those days with sweet content. 



I see the school down in the vale 
About whose walls do lie, 

The mem’ries of a sweeter past. 
Of dearer days gone by. 



I see the brook where oft I fished 
With pole, and hook, and bait; 

And when the evening sun went down 
The homeward path I’d take. 

I see the swimming hole I loved 
And hear the gleeful shout. 

Of boyhood playmates that I loved — 

In joyful, playful bout. 

Those happy times I now recall, 
Those years now passed away; 

And so my heart holds treasured 
thoughts 

Of boyhood's golden day. 



THE GIRL WHO WOULDN’T DO 



A sweet young thing with a pair of 
eyes. 

And a smile with dimples, too, 

Followed rules so wise they would 
cause surprise, 

At the things she wouldn’t do. - 

Dancing was the first upon the list 

Of things that were taboo; 

She did strong desist from’ all shake 
and twist, 

And said dancing wouldn’t do. 

In all her talk she was very nice. 

And the line of bull she threw 

Was as cold as ice with no touch of 
spice — 

She said hot stuff wouldn’t do. 

She would never go out with the 
crowd on a lark. 

Nor ride in a car or canoe, 

Nor stroll in the park when the even- 
ing was dark. 

For such things wouldn't do. 



She said to her beaux “You must go 
at ten, 

But come again, yes, do” 

But the thankful men simply said 
“Amen” 

For they saw she wouldn’t do. 

One happy night there came around 
A fool who thought to woo. 

But the unlucky hound quite prompt- 
ly found 

That wooing wouldn’t do. 



Since she wouldn’t sit out in the swing 
Her beaux went to none from few; 

As she wouldn’t sing or anything 
They all said she wouldn’t do. 

L’envoi. 

Girls, from this tale you may get a 
clew. 

And learn a lesson without more 
ado — 

If you won’t do “nothing” they’ll 
speak of you 

As a girl who is nice but who would- 
n’t do. 



Can You Answer? 

Where can a man buy a cap for his 
knee. 

Or key to the lock of his hair? 

Can his eyes be called an academy? ^ 

Because there are pupils there? 

Who travels the bridge of his nose? 

In the crown of his head what gems 
are found? 

Can he use, when shingling the roof of 
his house, 

The nails on the ends of his toes? 

Can the crook of his elbow be sent to 
jail? 

If so, what did he do? 

How does he sharpen his shoulder 
blades? 

I’ll be hanged if I know, do you? 

Can he sit in the shade of the palm of 
his hand? 

Or beat on the drum of his ear? 

Does the calf of his leg eat the corn 
on his toes? 

If so, why not grow corn on the ear? 

— Yonkers Shield. 



“B. V. D.” 

The shades of night had long since 
fled. 

As through a mountain village sped 
A youth who wore mid snow and ice 
Those pants which bore that strange 
device — 

“B. V. D.” 

His thoughts were cold, his knees 
were froze 

Because he wore no other clothes; 
And like the silver clarion rung 
The accents of unpublished tongue — 
“B. V. D.” 

A traveler found him almost froze. 
Buried neath the snow and ice, 

But still he bore no other clothes 
Than those which bore that strange 
device — 

“B. V. D.” 

— Technique. 



“PEP” 

Vigor, vitality, vim and punch — 
That’s pep. 

The courage to act on a sudden 
hunch— 

That's pep. 

The nerve to tackle the hardest thing, 

With feet that climb, and hands that 
cling, 

And a heart that never forgets to sing. 
That’s pep. 

E'and and grit in a concrete base — 
That’s pep. 

Friendly smile on an honest face — 
That’s pep. 

The spirit that helps when another’s 
down, 

That knows how to scatter the dark- 
est frown. 

That loves its neighbor and loves its 
town, 

That’s pep. 

To say “I will,” for you know you 
can — 

That’s pep. 

To look for the best in every man — 
That’s pep. 

To meet each thundering knockout 
blow 

And come back with a laugh, because 
you know. 

You'll get the best of the whole darn 
show. 

That’s pep. — The Football World. 



Coach Freeland went to Vicksburg 
Saturday to referee the Choctaw-Ole 
Miss game. 

A large number of the students also 
went over to witness the contest, and 
many were unable to return before a 
late hour that night. Lilly, McKeith- 
en, Stokes, Gillis, Carr, Tate, Gallo- 
way. and C. C. Combs were among the 
number that made the trip. 



0. B. Triplett and Allen Cassity went 
on a week-end visit home last Sat- 
urday. 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Mississippi's Largest and Most Comfortable 
Theatre 



II* MAJESTIC 



Grand Concert Orchestra Accompanying 
Elaborate Motion Pictures 



FTiday-Saturday 

‘‘THE SKY PILOT” 
By Ralph Conner 
Harold Lloyd Comedy 



ISTRIONE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
COMING WEEK 

Monday-Tuesday 

“NOT GUILTY” 

A Spell Binder 
Pathe Review — Comedy 



Wednesday-Thursday 

Wanda Hawley in 
‘‘A KISS IN TIME” 
Vanity Comedy 



Friday-Saturday 

“SNOW BLIND” 

by Kathrine Newlin Burt 
Mack Sennett Comedy 



ORCHESTRA 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



Monday-Tuesday 

“THE WOMAN IN HIS HOUSE” 
Comedy, “Zero Hero” 

Masonic Club Meeting 

The Millsaps Masonic Club held a 
business meeting Saturday morning 
during the chapel hour in the Y. M. 
C. A. room. About fifteen men were | 
present. W. N. Ware, president of the 
organization, presided. Plans for en- 
tering the Square and Compass fra- 
ternity were presented by M. M. Me- | 
Gowan, the secretary. These plans 
met favorable consideration, and a 
committee to proceed with them was 
appointed." McGowan, Prof. Bowen, 
and Huddleston are members of the 
committee. 

Another business meeting is to be 
held at the Y. M. C. A. room this week 
at the Saturday chapel hour. AH col- 
lege Masons are requested to be 
present. 



Wednesday-Thursday 

“THE PRINCESS OF NEW YORK” 
Added Attraction, “Ben Turpin” 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Style* 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



Bobashela Staff Planning 
Annual Features 

The staff of the “Bobashela” met at 
Galloway Hall on Monday night to 
consider plans for the 1921-22 year- 
book. This was the first meetin 
the entire staff. The editor and 
ness manager made a report on the 
terms of the contracts signed for 
printing and engraving. Several fea- 
tures for the book this year were de- 
cided on. Among these features is a 
beauty section. 

The various department editors 
were given the assignments of their 
work, and plans in general were dis- 
cussed for the best annual Millsaps 
has ever known. 



John Simms spent the week-end at 
his home in Brandon last week. 



M. M. McCall and Jesse Watson 
have been conducting a revival out at 
Rankin Street Church for the last two 
weeks. F. L. Applewhite, the pastor, 
announces great good as the result of 
their splendid preaching. 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



E. O. Baird journeyed down to 
Brookhaven last Sunday to meet his 
preaching appointments. 



I. E. Williams is meeting his classes 
again after several days of confine- 
ment as a result of sickness. 



ORM/T 



IherO'Cola 



R. B. Reeves went to the Baptist 
Hospital last week, and underwent an 
operation there. The student body is 
glad to know that Reeves will soon be 
all right again. 



Friday-Saturday 

Gloria Swanson in 
“THE GREAT MOMENT” 
Clyde Cook Comedy 



^/icunftefJ 



EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE. 



Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A JOO^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 



CAPITAL NATIONAL 




BANK 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




United States, Hinds County and City Depository 


Capital paid in 


$200,000.00 

200,000.00 


Surplus earned 

Undivided profits, net 


225,000.00 

25,000.00 


ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 




1 




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Don’t Mention His Name but You Will Probably 
Find Him Enjoying 

A FEW HOURS OF REAL CLEAN SPORT 

at the 

PALACE BILLIAR;D!HA|LL 



(( 



BARKER BREAD" 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



J. S. Barbour visited in Yazoo City 
last week. 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 



During the small hours of the night j 
following a dance in town, the writer 
| heard a freshman come stumbling up 
the stairs of Burton Hall joyously 
[singing this ballad: 



Azziwuz walkin’ dahnthey treet, ' 

_ . r T tt r> n n Apritt eegurl Ichanstta meet, 

J. A. U U B£ R I Itwuzda merrimunta May; 

Sheez miledatme sograndtta se-e-e 
Ice ez ‘That there ’sdda gurllform 
e-e-e-e 

So beautifulangay!’” 



“Lips that touch liquor shall never 
touch mine,” 

The maiden declared with fervor di- 
vine. 

The cave man then answered, with 
mirthful glee, 

“Lips that kiss poodle shall never 
kiss me.” 

— Kentucky Wesleyan. 



“Killdee had a terrible accident.” 
“How was that?” 

“He was describing a boat race and 
broke both his elbows.” — Sewanee 
Purple. 



ANNOUNCING 

Advance Styles in Cards for the 

Christmas -Tide 

Order Now 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 







flu rph anft 



Vol. XIV. 



QUAE FI ANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, NOV. 18, 1921 



No. 9 



FRESHMEN SELECT MILLSAPS HELP JACKSON MAJORS ALL ABOARD MISS. CHOCTAWS 
OFFICERS EOR 1921-22 CELEBRATE ARMISTICE FOR SHREVEPORT MASSACRE "OUR TEAM' 



J. C. Galloway Is President; 
Honor Council Man 
Is Chosen After 
Close Contest 

The Freshman Class was convened 
on Tuesday for the annual election of 
officers. The election was somewhat 
delayed this year, but the two months 
already past gave the members a 
chance to know each other well 
enough to vote intelligently. O. H. 
Scott, president of last year’s Fresh- 
man Class, called the meeting and 
presided over it. D. D. Culley acted as 
official secretary of the meeting. 

The first office to be filled was that 
of president. Several persons were 
nominated, but the honor went to J. C. 
Galloway. Miss Bethany Swearingen 
was elected to the vice-presidency on 
the first ballot. Wallace Lester was 
chosen as secretary-treasurer. The 
selection of the representative on the 
Honor Council led to the hottest con- 
test of the meeting. The first ballot 
cut the field of contestants down to 
three — O. L. Ellis, Harold Lewis and 
Mrs. Jim Sells. The n4xt ballot limited 
the race to Ellis and Lewis. These two 
then tied for the place. A fourth 
count, however, gave the office to Har- 
old Lewis. 

The persons selected by the fresh- 
men as their leaders are well qualified 
to handle the business of the class. 
Under their direction, all of the class 
activities of the year should be 
marked by succeess. The meeting ad- 
journed after it had been announced 
that there would be a further session 
on Thursday morning. 

BELHAVEN ENTERTAINS 
PREACHERS LEAGUE 

Young Ministers Enjoy Dr. 
Vandermullen’s Speech 

The members of the Preachers 
League received an invitation last 
week to attend a meeting at Belhaven 
College. The occasion was an ad- 
dress by Dr. Vandermullen, a promi- 
nent Presbyterian. Needless to say, 
the young ministers were ready and 
willing to hear the speech. They went 
over to the college across the hill 
last Tuesday evening. 

The program follows: 

1. Song— “Give of your best to the 
Master.” 

2. Prayer — Dr. Hudson freturned 
missionary to China.) 

3. Scripture Lesson — Luke 14 — 
Dr. Vandermullen. 

4. Introductory Address — Dr. Gil- 
lespie of Belhaven. 

5. Address of the evening — Dr. , 
Vandermullen — United Presbyterian 
Synodical Worker and Inspector of 
Religious Schools. 

The main points of his address, 
which was delivered with much ease, 

(Continued on page 2) 



Dr. Mitchell and Sells on 
Program; Student Body 
In Parade 

In accordance with the proclama- 
tion of President Harding declaring a 
national holiday on November 11th, 
the faculty of Millsaps College gave 
the students an unconditional release 
from their “studious cares” last Fri- 
day. Their only request was thkt the 
students take part in the parade and 
celebration in the city of Jackson — 
and this was done right nobl? by 
the majority. 

Those taking part in the parade as- ! 
sembled on Mill Street, near the 
Union Station, at ten o’clock; and it 
was a stirring scene tftat those gath- 
ered as spectators beheld when the 
march began. There were Colonels, 
Majors, Captains, and Lieutenants 
mingled with Sergeants, Corporals, 
and “Bucks.” Officers and “Gobs”, 
men of the Marines, Y. M. C. A. 
workers. Red Cross “Angels” — in fact, 
there were representatives of every 
group of loyal Americans who took 
part in the World War. It was an in- 
spiring sight to see how all these 
assembled as brethren upon this day 
to do homage to our “unknown dead.” 

Various civic organizations were 
represented in this assembly, and 
there were also representative bodies 
from Belhaven and Millsaps. (The 
writer is forced to .proclaim to all the 
world that the Belhaven group was 
by far the best drilled and best look- 
ing part of the whole parade!) The 
parade moved along Mill Street, into 
Capitol, then on up to State Street, 
and on through the . Fair Grounds to 
the grandstand, where the exercises 
of the day were held. 

Captain Fred Sullens, Commander 
of Henry Graves post of the Ameri- 
can Legion, officiated during the cere- 
monies that were carried out. Those 
in the speakers stand with him were 
Rev. James Sells. U. S. N.; Rev. J. B. 
Hutton; Hon. Fred Lotterhos;and a 
Boy Scout bearing “Old Glory.” The 
exercises were opened with a rendi- 
tion of the S’tar Spangled Banner by 
the Shrine Band, during which every- 
one in the grandstand stood with 

(Continued on page 3) 



Centenary College and Mill- 
saps to Meet in First 
Football Clash To- 
morrow 

Coach Freeland accompanied by 
twenty men of the football squad, 
leaves Jackson today for Shreveport, 
where the Majors meet the Centenary 
pigskin handlers tomorrow in the 
first football game ever played be- 
tween these institutions. The reports 
from Centenary are that they have a 
fairly heavy line with a fast back 
field, the team averaging about the 
same in weight as ours. Not much is 
known about their record this year, 
but we have several old Centenary 
students with us who say that they 
will put up a hard fight. The coach 
and team leave confidetat of being able 
to bring back a victory. Fowler, 
Culley, and Carr are back in the line 
up Although the team will be weak- 
ened by the absence of McEwen at 
tackle, the coach has a good man in 
Campbell to shift from end to that po- 
sition. 

The team has had several scrim- 
mages this past week and with the ex- 
cepUo,. cfa few minor bruises the 
men are all in good condition. They 
are going to spring a few new plays 
on the *Louisiana boys, and try to 
show them a few things about the 
forward pass. Galloway, who had bis 
knee hurt in last Friday’s game, is 
going to be in the game with that o!d 
fighting spirit of his that has charac- 
terized his playing thus far. 

The game tomorrow will mean much 
to the team. If we win and come out 
without any injuries, the team will 
come back to Jackson in high spirits 
and will be in condition to make the 
fight of their lives in the game 
Thahksgiving when w T e tackle the 
Tennessee Doctors. This game 
Thanksgiving is going to be one of the 
hardest on our schedule. The Doc- 
tors have a heavy team and have not 
been defeated this season. Such 
Stars as Carman, of Vanderbilt, Ford 
of Center and Schwill of Mississippi A. 
& M. have donned the grey and white 
jerseys of the U. T. Doctors. These 
men will be hard to stop, but* * * 

let’s defeat Centenary first, then — 



Fighting Majors are Crush- 
ed by 56 to 0 Score 

The Mississippi Collegians failed by 
four points to run the score up to the 
sixty point that they piled up against 
Millsaps last year, when they defeat- 
ed the Majors last Friday (Armistice 
Day). The score does not reveal the 
fact that the Purple and White team 
fought hard from the beginning to end. 
However, that was the case, for when 
the final whistle blew with the ball in 
Millsaps territory and with their backs 
to the wall, the Majors were making 
a gallant stand. It was a question 
from the first of being outweighed 
and outclassed in every department, 
except the spirit to play hard and fair 
no matter how great the odds. Every- 
one realized before tl^e game began 
that Millsaps had not a gt lost of a 
chance against our rivals, but many 
hoped that we might be able to cross 
the Choctaw goal line for a much cov- 
eted touchdown. 

The Mississippi coaches did not 
send in their regular line-up until the 
last quarter. Too much cannot be 

(Continued on page 6) 



— 

“BOBASHELA” 


ADVERTISERS 


Trade With Them 


The Emporium 


Bert Harrington's Fountain 


Mitchell & Dixon 


(In S'immons & McGee) 


Duke & Lasseter 


Taylor Furniture Co. 


Daniel’s Studio 


Tucker Printing House 


Bufkin’s Shoe Store 


Hollensbee Studios 


Carter’s Jewelry Store 


Star Laundry 


The Pantaze 


Wright Laundry 


Downing-Locke 


Ford’s Drug Store 


Draughon’s Business College 


Chambers Office Supply Co. 


Baptist Book Store 


Millsaps Book Store 


Simmons & McGee 

❖ 


Millsaps College 



\Y. M. Buie is Host on Last 
Wednesday 

Members of the football squad, 
Coach Freeland, Dr. Key, Dr. Mitchell 
and Prof. White were the guests of 
Mr. Webster Buie, an alumnus of 
Millsaps. at an oyster supper at the 
Ben Ton Cafe, Wednesday evening, 
Nov. 9. 

After the delightful supper had been 
served, Mr. Buie, Coach Freeland, Dr. 
Key, Prof. White, and Captain Wind- 
ham made short talks. 

Mr. Buie praised the team highly 
for the excellent showing it had made 
this year and their fighting spirit and 
sportsmanship displayed at all times. 
He went back to the days when he was 
a student at Millsaps and spoke of the 
contests of those days. He said that 
the spirit of Millsaps was, and always 
had been, to fight until the last 
whistle. 

Coach Freeland said that he was 
highly pleased with the showing made 
by the team this year and that it far 
exceeded his expectations. He said 
that the team fought until the last 
whistle, that he had never seen them 
stop until the end of a game, and that 
as long as they fought there was 
abundant opportunity for making a 
winning team. 

“This is the first time I have seen 
all the football team at one time," 
said Captain Windham, in his speech, 
and he further stated that he was glad 
to see them all out at one time. 

Dr. Key and Prof. White made inter- 
esting talks. 











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REPRESENTATIVES OP 

PHONE CO. VISIT COLLEGE 

— 

i 

Mr. Parrish Promises Dor- 
mitory Phone to Stud- 
ents 

Mr. Shaftell, of the Cumberland 
Telephone Company, and Mr. Dabney 
Parrish, local manager of the com- 
pany, were present at chapel Tuesday 
morning and each made a talk in re- 
gard to the telephone service. 

Mr. Shaftell said that people could 
get long distance messages through 
at less cost if they would go about it 
in the right way. which he described 
as follows: call the phone number of 
the place or person with whom a con- 
versation is desired, call after 8:30 p. 
m. for half rate, and call after mid- 
night for one-fourth of the regular day 
rate. This method of calling the 
phone desired is the station to station 
method of calling. 

Mr. Parrish emphasized what Mr. 
Shaftell had said and then went on 
to say that the service rendered here 
in Jackson was more than worth the 
r ate charged. He also stated that he 
had for some time been opposed to 
nutting a telephone into the dormitory 
and had thought that it would not be 
necessary to have one, but having 
ccme out to the college and havine 
seen the student body, he had decided 
that it would be well to have a phone 
here. Mr. Parrish’s speech met the 
-"-rival of the students who room in 
the dormitory and who have felt the 
need so long for the phone. 



TIMES. 



413 E. Capitol St. 



Belhaven Entertains 

Preachers League 

(Continued from page^) 

humor and effect, were: (a) The 

three questions that all persons must 
settle in their youth. (1) Will you be 
a Christian or not? (2) Will you be 
single or married? If married, to 

• whom? (3) What will your life work 
be? 

' (b) Some startling facts; viz, that 

after they reach the age of 21 years 
men are old fogies, and that after 
they reach the age of 25 years their 
professional or business habits are 
formed. Dr. Vandermullen laid special 
stress on counting the cost of the 
thing that you do. “For,” he said, “if 
it costs you nothing it is worth noth- 
ing.” 

• Another thing that we learned was 
that the great question before the 

, world is, “Shall the world be Christ- 
ian or pagan? S’hall it be a w r orld of 
happiness or one of inexpressible 
horror?” But it will cost. You cost 
your parents something. He then 
caused a laugh by relating his ex- 
i perience in taking care of a baby for 
six weeks. 

He represented religion as a tower 
| of Beauty, Safety, and Vision. He 
; represented the League of Nations 
: as the vision of Isaiah, Tennyson, and 
Wilson. 

| 6. Prayer — Dr. Vandermullen. 

’ 7. Belhaven girls and the privi- 

leged few of the League. 

"I don't think that is fare,” said the 
conductor as Coursey handed him an 
old transfer. 

Dr. Noble (in economics) — “If- you 
had a hundred dollars you: wouldn't 
put it all in shoes wo nld y-ou?” 

Co-ed — “No sir I w ould put it in 
t my stockings.” 



USUAL Y. W. C. A. MEET- 
ING LAST WEEK 

Workers, Shirkers, and Jerkers Are 
Presented as Representing 
Classes of Girls. 

On last Thursday, the regular Y. 
W. C. A. meeting was held at the Hut 
and w-hile the attendance was not 
w’hat it should have been, those who 
were present found the program help- 
ful. 

After the usual transaction of busi- 
ness the following program was giv- 
en: 

1. Introduction of topic — Mildred 
Brashear told us that in our Y. W. 
activities there are three types of 
girls — workers, shirkers, and jerkers. 

2. “Workers” was the topic dis- 
cussed by Ruby McClellan, w r ho said 
there are girls who work for personal 
glory, others who work for the work’s 
sake, and those who work because 
they believe they ought to; hut the 
real object of our work should be 
service to others, and the glory of 
God. 

3. "Shirkers” were discussed by 
Bethany Swearingen. She warned us 
to beware lest we become shirkers 
merely by virtue of the fact that we 
found it so easy to neglect our work. 
A shirker is a slacker, and we all 
know how the person who failed to 
do his duty during the war was looked 
down on. It is the same in the time 
o: peace. 

4. “Jerkers” were compared by 
Alice Sutton to a Ford car which 
starts off with great force, then stops 
suddenly and starts again. She maae 
the point that we are human ma- 
chines, and that, if we allow it, we 
may become like Fords — starting our 
work with great energy and “pep” 
then slackening up until another 
working mood strikes us. 

5. Nellie Clark read the Scripture 
lesson from Romans 12, and we all 
repeated the Lord’s Prayer. 

6. Mildred Brashear made a short 
talk; and the meeting closed with 
the Mizpah benediction. 

The Wrong Cross 

. “How did it come about,” a friend 
of the family asked, “that old Gold- 
burg’s daughter refused Lord ?’’ 

“Well, you see,” another friend of 
the family answered, “Jane Goldburg 
is slightly deaf, and when the Earl 
proposed to her she thought he was 
soliciting for the Red Cross, and so 
she told him she was very sorry, but 
she had promised her money in an- 
other direction.” 

— London Evening News. 

Idiotic Interrogations 

Did you ever see a smile on the 
mouth of a river? 

Did you ever see a corn on the foot 
of a hill? 

Or a frown on the face of the earth? 

And how about a wink in the eye of 
a needle? 

To say nothing of the muscles in an 
arm of the sea? 

— Mississippian. 

No, Oswald, we take it back. Snor- 
ing is not “sound sleeping;” it’s 
“shoet music.” 

— Mississippian. 

A pretty young girl in a fury, 

Tool; her case to a court and a jury. 

■She said Trolley E 
Had injured her knee, 

But the jury said, “We’re from Mis- 
souri.” 

—Mississippian. 

Two little worms were digging 
away in dead earnest. Poor Earnest. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



Millsaps Helps to 

Celebrate Armistice 

(Continued from page 1) 

bared head, or at attention if in uni- 
form.- 

Capt. Sullens then told of the honor 
that was to be done to the unknown 

I soldier, and that at the hour of eleven 
all would be requested to face the 
east in silent tribute to those who 
died fighting for the cause of Liberty 
and Freedom in the recent war. This 
was done for a period of two minutes, 
and then Rev. Sells (Our Jim) ren- 
dered the invocation. In accordance 
with the plan of community singing, 
Dr. B. E. Mitchell (Our Broncho) led 
the assembled throng in singing 
I “America.” 

After the announcement of the 
ceremony of planting twenty-five live 
oaks, to be held at Livingston Park 
at two in the afternoon as a memorial 
to each Jackson man who made the 
supreme sacrifice, Capt. Sullens an- 
nounced that there would be a foot- 
ball game in the afternoon between 
Millsaps College and Mississippi Col- 
| lege. Then Prof. Mitchell again led 
the singing, and the hills ’round about 
rang with the echo of “Keep the 
Home Fires Burning." 

The citizens of Jackson were 
thanked by Captain Sullens, on behalf 
of the American Legion, for their 
co-operation in the celebration, and 
then Hon. Fred Lotterhos was intro- 
duced as the speaker of the day. 
In a most eloquent manner, Mr. Lot- 
terhos held the undivided attention 
of everyone gathered there. He first 
told of how our Constitution w;as 
formed, and of the great sacrifice 
made by our forefathers that it might 
be possible for us to enjoy the peace 
and liberty that have been our herit- 
age. He pointed out that no people 
had ever known what it was to make 
their own laws and choose their own 
“peers” until the birth of this famous 
document. And so strongly did our 
grandfathers believe in it, that they 
took up arms against each other in 
the memorable battle between the 
North and the South, that it might 
be interpreted properly. Again in 
’98, when it seemed that a violation 
of its principles was being enacted, 
our fathers answered the call to its 
defense. 

In this manner, Mr. Lotterhos 
showed what our traditions held for 
us, and why it was that our men 
engaged in a war from which they 
could hope for no personal gain — 
other than the satisfaction of doing 
that which was right. He showed 
that it was the greatest duty of every 
American citizen to do all honor to 
those who died for the “cause” and 
also to those who were disabled, for 
nothing could be done to comfort 
those who died more than the proper 
caring for those who did not die — 
but sometimes wished they had, be- 
cause of their disabilities. 

To the living comrades of our fal- 
len heroes, Mr. Lotterhos looks to 
keep up the work of making this 
world a more fit place to live in. He 
showed that ex-service men have gone 
through the "test of fire,” and are 
more able to carry on the affairs of 
this government, and the manage- 
ment of the world’s business, than 
their fathers. In a very fitting man- 
ner, Mr. Lotterhos declared that the 
greatest help to the advancement of 
good-will and fellowship could be 
gained from a study of God’s book, 
and the following of its teachings. 

Dr. J. B. Hutton dismissed the 
throng of fully five thousand people 
with prayer, after the singing of that 
comforting hymn, “God be With You 
Till we Meet Again.” It was a day 



Join A Literary Society 

There should be a much greater 
interest manifested in literary socie- 
ties in the colleges of the land. The 
men who go to college are expected 
to take places of leadership wherever 
they go. The ability to speak in pub- 
lic is one of the factors in good lead- 
ership. Some schools offer courses 
in public speaking, but many of them 
do not. In that case the college lit- 
erary society offers a most practical 
course in public speaking which is 
accessible to all who will take it. 
Yet here in Millsaps not more than 
half of the students avail themselves 
of the opportunities offered them in 
our societies. Millsaps has two good 
literary societies. They do a good 
work and some of Millsaps most 
prominent graduates have in their 
college days been identified with one 
or the other of them. An active mem- 
bership in one of them throughout 
one’s college course is of as much 
value as any course taken in the col- 
lege. Each student pays his literary 
society dues at matriculation whether 
he joins one or not. If he does not 
join, he does not get his money’s 
worth. The co-eds should have their 
societies and take an interest in 
them. It might be well if attendance 
on them were compulsory, as attend- 
ance at chapel is compulsory. At any 
rate they are here, they are WELL 
WORTH WHILE, and EACH STU- 
DENT SHOULD DO HIS PART IN 
ONE OF THEM. When every student 
takes part, new societies will be 
needed and they will be additions to 
the value of Millsaps College. 

—A MEMBER. 



KIT KATS MEET WITH 
PROF. WHITE 



The Kit Kat Club met on Tuesday 
night with Prof. White at his home 
on West Street. The members en- 
joyed a very pleasant and profitable 
evening. The paper submitted to the 
club by Prof. White* was more than 
usually good, and was consequently 
of great interest. Delightful refresh- 
ments w T ere served by the host. 



MISS SULLIVAN’S PARTY 



Last Thursday night Miss Eleanor 
Gene Sullivan entertained a number 
of her friends at her residence on the 
campus in one of the most delightful 
social functions of the season. 

The guests were somewhat sur- 
prised to find that almost unbroken 
silence reigned when they entered 
the house. Such placards as “Mum’s 
Queen,” “Don’t wake the baby,” "Be 
welcome but silent” w T ere conspicu- 
ously placed about the house. Each 
guest was given a pad and a pencil 
by which to communicate with the 
others. One’s patience was tried by 
the enforced silence, as each one had 
so much to say to the other that he 
simply couldn’t write fast enough or 
crowd enough in so short a space. 

A contest in which the various 
phases of a marriage ceremony and 
a honeymoon were named from flow- 
ers, was engaged in. Miss Alee Pate 
and Mr. Austin Joyner were the win- 
ners of a beautiful bouquet of roses 
and a rose bud respectively. 

After the serving of delightful re- 
freshments, the party broke up, to 
the regret of each one present. 



full of meaning and inspiration for 
all those privileged to take part in 
the celebration, and will do much to- 
wards furthering peace among men, 
and good-will towards all the world. 



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The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 



CORRECT STYLES in FOOTWEAR 

FOR COLLEGE MEN 

BUFKIN SHOE COMPANY 
172 East Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



| THE DANIEL STUDIO 

| The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. 

NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 



AW, GIRLS 

You play for his ready tenor, 

Spill fudge on your second best frock, 
You stifle your yawn behind your, 
hand. 

And try not to look at the clock. 

You listen to football dope and slang. 
Till your head's in a perfect whirl; 
Now ain’t that a helluva evening 
For a nice intellegent girl. 



Prof. Lin has been endeavoring to 
raise money for the Armenian Relief 
Fund this week and last week. The 
cause is worthy and should be well 
supported. 



What's That 

Water Cold, 

Bristles Long, 

Razor Dull, 

Language Strong. 

— Sandspur. 



“Here’s where I prove an artist 
Without a brush” he cried; 

And drew a lovely maiden 
Up close to his side. 

— Sandspur. 



Irish son-in-law calling up the doc- j 
tor for a call. 

“Say, Doc, My mother-in-law’s at J 
death’s door. Can’t you come around j 
at once and pull her through?” 

— Sou’Wester. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 
T. B. D O X E Y 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry C». 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Md. 



qiiiiiMMiaiiiiiiuiMiniiiHiiiiiiiDiiiuiiini' 



4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription J1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 


Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 


STAFF 

Editor-In-Chief - 






















.T W Sella 






REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear^ 
L. Villee. 


Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
A. L. Joyner, D. F. McNeil, H. 


MANAGEMENT 


_ . ..H. B. Collins 








G. K Hebert 




$5,000 FOR A NEW 


GYM. 



Millsaps College needs to build a new gymnasium at once. The 
building which at present bears the name of “gym” is no longer 
adequate to the needs of our athletic program. No one can dispute 
that fact. Not only is the building an ugly and dilapidated struc- 
ture, but it is really unsafe when its galleries are packed to the 
limit with spectators. 

We have talked a great deal about getting the alumni behind 
the athletics of the school. Now we see that they are there and are 
helping in many ways. It is up to the college itself to take the 
lead in showing an interest in the athletic side of the institution. 
That lead can be expressed in no better way than in the building of 
a new gymnasium. 

When we say gymnasium, we mean a frame structure that will 
be adequate for the basketball games and for mass athletics in bad 
weather. We have it on good authority that such a building can 
be erected for $5,000. That is a small sum, when we consider the 
great good that will come from its expenditure. 

Our prospects for extraordinary athletic success are better in 
basketball than in anything else this year. But we cannot expect 
to accomplish very much when we have no satisfactory place for 
the team to play. 



THE EMPORIUM 

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WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 





It may be objected that a real, first-class gym is on the build- 
ing program. That may be true, but it will be several years before 
we can hope for that gym to be built. What we must have is some- 
thing to fill our present and pressing need. 

We do not .know who hold the purse strings, but we believe 
that they can make no wiser move than to build this gym. In so 
doing, they will be serving the best interests of Millsaps. But for 
the new gym to do the fullest good, it should be built at once. If it 
can be built at all, it can be begun this month. 



Correct Clothes 
for College Men 

Harris ’ 

STORE FOR MEN 



All kinds of 
Sea Foods 
in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



CONCERNING BELHAVEN. 



It has been unfortunate that the students of Belhaven College 
and of Millsaps College have seemed to lose interest in each other 
during the last two years. Before that time, a close, friendly feel- 
ing existed between the Millsaps boys and the fair ones across the 
hill. Every public function at Belhaven College was heavily at- 
tended by our students, and on rare occasions our neighboring 
student body attended entertainments here. Let us hope that the 
time will soon come tvhen conditions like that will be again. 

After witnessing the grandstand scene at the game last Friday, 
we feel that such hopes are not in vain. The Belhaven girls were 
cheering for Millsaps as heartily as if they were students of our 
college. We want them to know that the students of Millsaps Col- 
lege appreciate their support. They have taken the first step in 
demonstrating willingness to co-operate. 

Hurrah for Belhaven! •' j £ \ 








THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 




#traiford Cloth rsc 



When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. | 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

^tratforb Clotfjesi 

suits and overcoats will repay i 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
| are complete. 




6130 

The Flavor Lasts! 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 



OOODOOOOOOOOOOOODOOODOOOOO 

OPEN FORUM 

■occoocoooooooooooocx>c>ooooo 

FOOLISH CONSISTENCY 

Emerson says : "A foolish consis- 

tency is the hob-goblin of little minds, 
adored by little statesmen, philoso- 
phers, and divines. As well be con- 
cerned with consistency as with a 
shadow on the wall. Say what you 
think in hard words today, and to- 
morrow say what you think in hard 
words again, even though it contra- 
dict everything you said today.” 

The great majority of us are so 
afraid that we will be misunderstood 
that we lack the courage which it 
takes to defend those principles in 
which we believe, and we do not dare 
to voice our changing opinions for 
fear some one will call us ineonsis- 
eni. 

There is no growth without change. 
The older we become, the more our 
bodies develop and the 'more we 
grow, physically — this, in order that 
we may betnme more fitted to stand 
up under the burdens that quite 
naturally rest on those who desire 
to make themselves count for some- 
thing in life. 

It is the same with spiritual 
growth. How foolish, and yet how- 
tragic, it would be if we insisted that 
we could not accept Christ’s teach- 
ings and could never be saved, only 
because we had never before believed 
in those principles! This is foolish 
consistency and is one of the chief 
enemies of our advancement as a 
Christian nation. When we are con- 
vinced that a conviction is funda- 
mentally incorrect, and are given 
something more satisfying, some- 
thing better, as a substitute, why 
hold to petty stubborness on the plea 
that we must be consistent? 

We are particularly concerned at 
this time with mental growth. We 
are here at Millsaps for a definite 
purpose; we are here to receive a 
well-rounded training — a liberal edu- 
cation; we are here to find ourselves. 
Can we, then, .be hindered by a fool- 
ish consistency that warns us to be- 
ware lest we be misunderstood? “Say 
what you think in hard words today, 
and tomorrow say what you think in 
hard words again, even though it con- 
tradict everything you said today.” 
Most college students are so deeply 
concerned with other less important 
matters that they forget to stop and 
reason out things — to ask the why 
and wherefore of great national 
questions and world movements. We 
are so content to be consistent that 
we soon find ourselves at a perfect 
standstill. In our college activities 
we make many kinds of excuses that 
are supposed to free our consciences 
from anything like a hurt at the fail- 
ure to do our duty. “We have to 
study.” Here their foolish consist- 
ency merges into inconsistency and 
nothing comes of it. 

Some one * has written; “The 
trained mind, the broadened view, 
the developed personality are really 
worth as much to the college graduate 
as all the knowledge he gets out of 
his text books.” Let us prove 
the truth of this statement. Let’s 
not be looked upon as “one-sided af- 
fairs;” let’s not be inconsistent, 
either. But certainly let us endeavor 
to form wise opinions and to have a 
good store of general knowledge. Let 
us not be so foolishly consistent that 
we will fail to be brave enough to 
say exactly what we think, provided 
our thoughts are in conformity with 
Christian principles and are con- 
ducive to social betterment — let us 
say it, even though we be misunder- 
stood. “To be great is to be mis- 
understood.” 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 



Under separate faculty and dormitory management, 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



Unsur- 



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JACKSON, MISS. 1 

I 




6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



J 




Miss. Choctaws MILLSAPS PREPS VS 

Massacre Our Team CHAMBERLAIN HUNT 



(Continued from page 1) 

said of how the tired Majors rallied, 
although tired out front the dusty 
battle, and fought the regulars. Sev- 
eral times the great “Goat” Hale was 
thrown behind the line of scrimmage 
for losses. This is something that 
many' teams have not been able to 
do very often this year. 



The Prep football squad met the 
eleven from Chamberlain-Hunt in 
Vicksburg last Friday, Armistice Day. 
The game was one of the best of the 
season. 

The Preps entered the game full 
of pep and confident of victory, and 
were only cheated of their expecta- 
tions, when, in the last twenty sec- 



It was Mississippi College’s game 
throughout. The Majors were unable 
to complete passes for the fact that 
the Choctaws were so well coached to 
break them up. Several times, how- 
ever, the passing of Galloway was suc- 
cessful. Throughout the game Coach 
Freeland’s huskies attempted to pass 
the ball, as it was next to impossible 
to penetrate the heavy Choctaw line. 

There were no stars for Millsaps. 
The whole team played good defensive 
ball throughout. The punting of 
Stovall was good, several times going 
for sixty-five yards. 

The only thing that marred the 
game was the fact that McEwen, 
tackle and star forward in basket ball, 
got his leg broken. It is one of the 
misfortunes that go with any sport 
that makes real fighting men. The 
accident occurred in the third quarter. 
It was not the fault of any Mississippi 
College player, but a misfortune that 
was unpreventable. 

Millsaps used the regular line up 
with the exception of two halves, 
these being played by J. W. Young 
and Leon Young. 



Strenuous Life 

Student enters. 

Takes seat. 

Answers roll (for himself). 
Answers roll (for cutting brother). 
Opens notebook. 

Looks at girl. 

Looks at Prof. 

Takes notes. 

Looks at girl. 

Closes notebook. 

Looks at girl. 

Looks at Prof. 

Looks at girl. 

Opens notebook. 

Bell rings. 

Closes notebook. 

Leaves. 

Outside, (“Say, Bill, isn’t this class 
awful ! ”) — Antheneum. 



JOURNALISM IS VERY ESSENTIAL 



Resolution Adopted in Press Congress 
in Honolulu; Favor Journalism 



Among the resolutions passed by 
the Press Congress of the World at 
its recent sessions held at Honolulu, 
Hawaii, was one that pledged the sup- 
port of the congress to methods of 
education in Journalism. 

Membership in the Press Congress 
includes the leading new’spaper men 
from all parts of the world. Their 
endorsement of college training in 
Journalism is tantamount to world- 
wide recognition of the value and im- 
portance of the Journalism courses 
given in the colleges and universities. 

— Reveille. 



Thomas Coursey has been sick for 
several days. We hope to see him 
well again soon. 



onds of the game, Chamberlain-Hunt 
completed a long random forward 
pass on their goal line. The Preps 
were weakened by the withdrawal of 
Kornegay, the fast halfback, in the 
first period. Capt. Nelson, in the 
position of quarter, directed his men 
well, and did some excellent line 
plunging on his own part. Stainton, 
Reynolds and Hughes also did good 
work for the Preps. The score was 
14-14. 



“A HINT TO THE WISE” 

Lives there a man, with soul so dead, 

Who never to himself hath said; 

I "If she smiles at me, 

I’ll lose my head.” 

And when we turn to gaze upon the 
j object of this poetical outburst, we 
| find that she expresses grace in every 
movement, beauty in every feature, 
and is the height of fashion in ap- 
pearance. 

Since the beginning of time, it has 
been customary for women to admire 
pretty things, and to wear them, as 
well as to dress their faces. Among 
each other, women are more fastidi- 
ous and observing than any mere man 
could be of them. They dress for 
their own society when they know 
that no man will be present. It is 
just the self satisfaction of knowing 
that they look well dressed. And 
when a man stands up and says that 
it is the height of disgust to see a 
| lady, when she walks into the slight- 
J est light, take out her powder puff 
I and dab her nose, then, he has either 
| lost his eye for beauty, or his appre- 
ciation of art. For what is more un- 
sightly than a highly polished nose, 
standing out in all its shining glory 
j upon a face duly powdered and 
rouged? It only takes two of these 
little dabs to restore the polished 
1 surface to its natural condition, then 
every one is happy. What boy, or 
man, is proud to escort a young lady 
down the street, or into a Theatre, 
who is absolutely ignorant of any cos- 
metic ever manufactured? He will 
| not be any more anxious to go with 
her than she will be to go with him, 
if he has his head shaved, and wears 
a “loud” collar. Compare the two. 

When a man says. “What do women 
mean by fashion, anyway? Why are 
they forever changing their mode of 
dressing, and hair arrangement?” List- 
I en. It was the style for men to wear 
beards in one generation, and shave 
clean in another. Flowered vests 
were once the rage, but are abhorred 
now. During the Civil War, “side- 
burns" were very popular for men’s 
hair-cuts. They have now come back. 
So it is that women’s fashions 
change. Leonardo da Vinci’s famous 
picture, Mona Lisa, had no eyebrows. 
During the time of the Renaissance, 
all society women plucked their eye- 
brows. Today the style has been re- 
born. It all reminds us of the old 



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Jackson, Miss. 




homely lines: 

Said Aaron to Moses, 

“Let’s cut off our noses;” 

Said Moses to Aaron, 

“’Tis the fashion to wear’em.” 
And so the world goes on. Maybe 
soon, the men w T ill cease to make 
slight remarks about the girl who 
powders her nose in public. She has 
long ago forgotten to be self-conscious 
when she does it. It has become an 
established habit — just as it is for a 
man to take out his handkerchief 
and mop his face violently. Which 
is the more refined looking? 



CITY SHOE SHOP 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 
every job of shoe repairing. 

306 West Capitol S$. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 



^^ccar10 

LJEWFLFH- 



So the next time a professor (even 
they take time to watch girls pow- 
der) announces to his class, in the 
middle of a recitation on S’hakes- 
peare, or the conflict between Francis 
II and Louis XVI, that the modern 
girl thinks of nothing but her looks, 
he had better look in a mirror first 
and wonder why he doesn’t blind the 
poor girl students sitting in front of 
him by his glaring nose, and his 
luminous forehead. 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 




The taking of Bobashela pictures 
is still in progress. The Pi Kappa 
Alphas, the Phi Mus, and the Kappa 
Deltas were on the photographer’s 
program early this week. 



Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 



“How’d you hurt your lip?” 

“Mable’s fault, darn her. S’he duck- 
ed. and I hit it on the door. 

Sun Dodger. 



Oh, Slush! 

I cannot eat with cross-eyed girls, 
For it always seems my fate 
Whenever one beside me sits; 

She eats out of my plate. Ex. 



SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 






THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




What does your son play on the 



team?” 

“He says he is the sinner.” 

Prof. Harrell — “What is a foot 
pound?” 

Maske — “A pound a foot in length 
or a foot a pound in weight.” 



Groot — “Can you name anything 
that will not freeze at 10 degrees be- 
low zero.” 

Sanders— “Yes sir. Hot water.” 



We think there should be a barber 
shop on the campus for co-eds only. 

Prof. Noble— "Do bad times make 
money scarce?” 

Watts — “Yes sir, and so do good 
times.” 



Spark — “My sister wants to know 
what you do at the bank?” 

Plug — "Teller.” 

Spark — “Tell her what?” 

Plug — “Teller at the bank.” 

Spark — “Can’t I tell her anywhere?” 



We have heard of leg shows but 
we have never heard of an arms con- 
ference before. 



The Editor says he would raise a 
mustache but he lost his razor. 



APPROPRIATE CHUMS 



Blount — Nail 
Maske — Ball 
Sells — Flowers 
Lotterhos — Power 
Brashear — V est 
Cross — Patch 
Ford — Carr 
McKean — Barber 
Ware — Overall 
Wright — Ballard 



Why does Ducky continue to argue 
when he knows Hermes is Kno-block? 



CLASS STONES 

Seniors Emerald 

Juniors ;. Blarney Stone 

Sophomores Grindstone 

Freshmen Tombstone 



ASK BRONCHO 

If a boy nine years old gets tired 
holding his baby sister, who weighs 
ten pounds, in twelve minutes, how 
long will it take a boy twice that age 
to get tired holding another fellow's 
sister, who weighs 125 pounds? 

LOGIC 

When you are finished, you are 
through. — Ducky. 

Prof — “You ought to take out an 
accident policy.” 

R. Moore — “Why?” 

Prof — “Some day a thought might 
strike you.” 

Vanderbilt has formed plans for a 
new stadium with a capacity of 
40,000. This stadium will cost about 
$150,000. The University will give 
$15,000. The remainder will be raised 
by the City of Nashville and the 
Alumni of Vanderbilt. 

— Vanderbilt Hustler. 



“Let me introduce Mr. Fish, he is 
an expert swimmer." 

“Ah, yes, take him down into the 
pool room, and let him enjoy him- 
self.” 

Sand spur. 



ONCE A YOUNG 

* * * 

MAN 

* * * 

WENT A LONG 

* * * 

WAY 

* * * 

FROM HOME TO 
* * * 

A COLLEGE 
* * * 

THAT HE 

* * « 

HAD HEARD ABOUT 
* * * 

AND THAT 
* * * 

HAD A 

* * * 

WONDERFUL 

* * * 

FOOTBALL TEAM. 

* * * 

THE YOUNG 

* * » 

MAN SOON WAS 
* * * 

CHANGED INTO 

* * * 

A FRESHMAN AND 

* * * 

THEN HE WAS NOT 

* * * 

THE SAME AS 
* * * 

HE HAD BEEN 

* * * 

BEFORE. 

* * * 

AFTER SOME 

* * * 

YEARS HE 
* * * 

OUTGREW BEING A 

* * * 

FRES-HMAN 

* * * 

AND FINALLY GOT TO 

* * * 

BE A GRAD. 

* » * 

THE TIME CAME WHEN 
« * * 

HE 

* * * 

WAS A GREAT MAN IN 

* * « 

THE THIRD WARD 

* » * 

AND AN HONOR 
* * * 

TO ALMA 

* * * 

MATER 

* * * 

MORAL: GOOD FOOTBALL 

* * * 

TEAMS DJ1AW 

« » * 

STUDENTS. 



THOSE WERE 

* * » 

THE 

» * * 

GOOD OLD DAYS 

* * * 

WHEN 

* * * 

PIRACY WAS IN FLOWER 

* * * 

A MAN COULD GO 

* * * 

OUT AND 

* * * 

TAKE WHAT HE 

* * * 

WANTED FTtOM HIS 

* * * 

NEIGHBOR 

* * * 

BUT IT WAS 

* * * 

HARD ON THE 

* * « 

NEIGHBORS. 



CHEER UP 

* » * 

THERE ARE LOTS 

« * * 

OF OTHER 

* * * 

BOOBS BESIDES 

* * * 

YOURSELF 

* * * 

IN THIS WORLD 

« * » 

AND YOU MAY BE 

* * * 

ABLE TO FOOL SOME OF 

» * » 

THEM INTO BELIEVING YOU 

* * * 

ARE IMPORTANT. 



A Clean Joke 

“May I hold your Palm Olive?” 
“Not on your Life Buoy.” 

— Teaser. 



MMUSk 

ti- up 

AND HOW’S THIS 

You sing a little song or two, 

You have a little chat. 

You make a little candy fudge. 

And then you take your hat. 

You hold her hand and say “Good- 
night” 

As sweetly as you can; 

Now ain’t that a helluva evening 
For a great big healthy man. 

DEATH OF THE CLASSMEN 

Deep wisdom, 

Swelled head, 

Brain fever. 

He’s dead — Senior. 



False love, 

Hope fled. 

Heart broken, 

He’s dead — Junior 



In class. 

Bumped head. 

Skull cracked, 

\ He’s dead. — Sophomore. 



Milk famine, 

Not fed. 

Starvation. 

He’s dead — Freshman. 

AN EXPLANATION 



She’s just a little flapper 
With a wisp o’ yellow hair, 

But when it comes to lovin’ 

My word! but she is there. 

She has a swing upon her porch. 
And when soft breezes blow, 
j We sit alone out in the dark 

And what we do — you ought’er 
know. 

jfy arm is placed about her waist. 
And lips, they meet in_ kiss; 

I whisper nothings in her ear — 

Oh boy! but that is bliss. 

I love her — Yes, there is no doubt 
She sets my brain awhirl, 

And you may know it’s just because 
She’s the other fellow's girl. 



WOMEN 



I wouldn’t give two whoops in Hade* 
For him who doesn’t love the ladies. 
There’s something lacking in his 
make up. 

And what he needs is one grand 
shake-up 

To make him see the patent fact 
That woman’s Nature's crowning act. 

A lot of us when we were youthful, 
And pretty foolish to be truthful, 
Imagined we were woman haters — 
Cold, caustic, cynic girl-beraters; 

But when the right one came along 
We soon found out that we were 
wrong. 

Year after year the truth grows 
plainer 

That all the world's a mighty gainer. 
In that the women still are present 
To smoothe what's rough and make 
things pleasant. 

The heart of any man is small, 

That hasn’t room to love them all! 

— Selected. 



O Saylor!! 

Bender — “Ship Ahoy! What boat is 
that and where is she going?” 
Griffith — “Never mind where she is 
going — and it ain’t a she. This is a 
mail boat.” 

— Sandspur. 



EXCHANGES 



At Richmond University chapel at- 
tendance is under the Honor Systdkn 
now. Each student is allowed six 
cuts per semester. Cuts above that 
number must be reported to the stu- 
dent government senate. No checking 
system is used. — The Critograph. 



It is estimated that the students in 
the University of Indiana save $60,000 
annually by sending their laundry 
home in the well known parcel post 
laundry boxes instead of having it 
done by the local laundries. Eighteen 
thousand boxes are sent from the Uni- 
versity every week. — The Washburn 
Review. 



President Warren G. Harding took 
part in the inauguration of Dr. Guy E. 
Snavely as president of Birmingham- 
Southern College. The college con- 
ferred the degree of Doctor of Laws 
on President Harding while there. — 
The Gold and Black. 



CO-EDS CORNER 

Along with the many advances and 
improvements, which have been made 
at the University this session, has 
come the organization of a student 
government association among the 
women students. This organization 
has been in power for several weeks. 
Every girl is supporting it with her 
heartiest co-operation. The officers 
are in dead earnest and intend that no 
effort of their’s which will promote 
the organization shall be lacking. 

Not only is it the aim of the girls to 
make the present regime a success 
but to leave a firmly established sys- 
tem of government for future stu- 
dents. — M ississippian. 



Two chemical laboratories of the 
agricultural experiment station, the 
office of the Dean of agriculture, and 
two small frame stockhouses were 
destroyed by fire at L. S. U. The 
total loss amounted to about $40,b00. 
The cause of the fire was unknown. 

— Reveille. 



There is no question so intangible 
or vital that it cannot be success- 
fully solved by the application of com- 
mon sense. 

The use of common sense is the be- 
ginning of wisdom, and when com- 
mon sense is overridden by undue 
agitation, it leads to quick conclu- 
sions that close the mind to reason. 

Without reason we cannot be rea- 
sonable and if we cannot be reason- 
able we cannot be fair to ourselves 
or to others. 

— Davidsonian. 



Full House. 

The hand I held I’ll hold no more. 

More beautiful than any I’d held be- 
fore, 

When I think it’ll never again be 
mine, I pine — 

’Twas this: King, queen, jack, ten, 
nine. 

— Davidsonian. 



Some Tribe. 

' Professor — “Mr. Brown, how many 
kinds of sheep are there?” 

Vic — “White sheep, black sheep, 
Mary’s little lamb, and a hydraulic 
ram.” 

—Davidsonian. 



Okeh 

Wheldon — “There’s one thing I like 
about a clay pipe.” 

Shreve — “What’s that?” 

Wheldon — “When you drop it — you 
don’t have to stoop to pick it up.” 
Sandspur. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Mississippi’s Largest and Most Comfortable 
Theatre 



The MAJESTIC 



Monday-Tuesday 

May Allison in 
“THE BIG GAME” 

Harold-Lloyd Comedy 



Wednesday-Thursday 

“THE TWO WIVES” 
All-Star Cast 
Toonerville Comedy 



East, West-Homes Best 
“THE OLD NEST” 
is coming 
Friday-Saturday 



Grand Concert Orchestra Accompanying 
Elaborate Motion Pictures 

Monday-Tuesday 

Alice Lake in 
“OVER THE WIRE” 
Harold Lloyd Comedy 



ISTRIONE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 
COMING WEEK 

Monday-Tuesday 

‘THE GOLDEN SNARE” 
With an All-Star Cast 
Snub Pollard Comedy 



Wednesday-Thursday 

Eugene O’Brien in 
“THE LAST DOOR” 
Vanity Comedy 



Friday-Saturday 
“WET GOLD” 

A thrill in every scene 
Comedy, “Cactus Nell” 



ORCHESTRA 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson. Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Style* 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
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line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



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FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBER 



Dr. — This is the third time you 
have been late to class. Don’t you 
know you can’t stay the flight of 
time? 

Fish — Oh. I don’t know. I just 
stopped a couple of minutes down 
the street. — Mugwump. 



LOCALS 



! 



The many friends of Miss “Doopie” i 
I Stevens are very sorry that she has 
been ill for several days. 



Henry E. Joyce ’18 was among the | 
loyal rooters at the game last Friday. 
“Heinie”, who is one of the main sup- 
ports of the Kennington store at ! 
Yazoo City, brought a large supply of [ 
toy horns with him. These were dis- 
tributed among the students, who 
made loud use of them during the j 
game. 



J. J. Rawls, who was a student here 
for several years, visited the campus 
last week. 



B. M. Hunt ’21, editor of the “Bob- 
ashela” last year and now a member 
of the Methodist ministry, was in 
town for the Mississippi game. 



Geo. R. Bennett ’20 of Madison 
paid a visit to Miilsaps last Saturday. 



Fred McEwen has been confined to 
the hospital on account of injuries. 
His many friends will be glad when 
he can be out again. 



A party composed of some of the 
students of the college gave Miss 
Lucy Watkins a surprise last Tues- 
day night, when thay went to her 
house for what is termed a "storm 
party”. In soni6 way, refreshments 
and other interesting things had bean 
prepared, so that everybody spent a 
very happy evening. 

The first number of a new publica- 
tion made its appearance last week. 
It is a little phamplet called the “Al- 
pha Mu News", published by the lo- 
cal chapter of the Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity. 

Prof. Harrell read some of the sta- 
tistics gathered from the first half- 
term reports in chapel Monday morn- 
ing. It seems from his statements 
that the scholarship of Miilsaps is 
much lower this year than iast. es- 
pecially among the boys. Or else, the 
work is harder. 



Three representatives of the Jack- J 
son Post of the American Legion 
came to the college Tuesday morning 1 
to solicit members for the American 
Red Cross. 



The Preachers League held a very I 
interesting session on Tuesday night | 
Rev. Mr. Tolle of the Capitol Street 
Church was the speaker of the oc- 
casion. 



The plan for the holding of a num- 1 
ber of high school debates at Mill- | 
saps next spring is meeting with suc- 
cess. Dr. Noble, who is in charge of 
the work, has received many satisfac- 
tory answers from the various schools j 
of the state. This meet will be of | 
great service to these schools, for it 
will put them in touch with each other 
and will lend encouragement to pub- 
lic speaking among the students of I 
high school age. 



The Masonic Club held a meeting 
on Wednesday night of this week. 



fiarnSei'd 



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ANNOUNCING 

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QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES . 

Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, DEC. 2, 1921 No. 10 



LAMAR SOCIETY SELECTS 
FRESHMAN DEBATERS 



Far Eastern Matters Hold 
Attention of Debaters 



Last Friday night the Lamar Liter- 
ary society held a meeting which was 
featured by the installation of officers 
and by the presence of some honored 
visitors. The men who took the oath 
and the seat of office were: Mack 
Swearingen, President: H. C. Young, 
Vice-President; Austin Joyner, Secre- 
tary; J. F. Watson, Chaplain; F. J. 
Lotterhos, Critic; “Dad” Tumlin 
Censor; and W. E. Stokes, Sergeant- 
at-Arms. The outgoing president and 
each of the newly installed officers 
delivered a brief — very brief — address. 

The orator of the evening was Fred 
Lotterhos, who spoke on the subject 
of parliamentary law. He brought to 
the attention of the society the fact 
that an informal “bull party” was not 
as valuable to the man preparing him- 
self for participation in deliberative 
assemblies as a meeting governed ac- 
cording to the customs and usages of 
conventions and legislatures. He 
recommended the study of Roberts’ 
Rules of Order, which may be found 
at the library. 

A debate was held on the question: 
Resolved, That the United estate 
should not participate in far Eastern 
affairs, E. K. Windham and Breeland 
Watkins upholding the affirmative 
side of the question and J. B. Abney 
and “Red” Carr the negative. There 
were good arguments on both sides, 
in spite of two of the speakers having 
been occupied with football during the 
week. The decision was a difficult 
(Continued on page 3) 



GALLOWAY ELECTION 
FDR LAST THREE TERMS 



Meetings of Society for No- 
vember 18th and 25th 
Are Lively 

A most important session of the 
Galloway Literary Society was called 
to order on November 18th. Its main 
purpose was the election of officers 
for the next three terms. W. H. Phil- 
lips opened the program with an ora- 
tion on “Duty to Humanity.” The de- 
bate of the evening was concerning 
the question of placing Biblical in- 
struction in the public schools of our 
state. But more perplexing than that 
was the impromptu debate as to 
whether the hen or the egg came first. 
Villee and Ray were of the opinion 
that the hen came first while Shanks 
and Ware favored the egg. 

The society then went into the busi- 
ness of elections. The results are as 
follows: Second Term — President, A. 
W. Bailey; Vice-President, H. L. Vil- 
lee; Secretary, J. W. Shanks; Assist- 
ant Secretary, M. S. Watson. Third 
Term — President, M. L. McCormick; 
Vice-President, J. L. Maske; Secre- 
tary, J. F. Waites; Assistant Secre- 
tary, J. S. Warren. Fourth Term — 
(Continued on page 2) 



THE FIGHTING MAJORS 




LEFT TO RIGHT, STAN Dl NG— COACH FREELAND, SCOTT, STOVALL, CARR, 
OVERALL, HONEYCUTT, WINDHAM (Capt.), McNAIR, CAMPBELL, MID- 
DLETON, N. C. YOUNG, W. GALLOWAY. 

KNEELING— MUSSELWHITE, CULLEY, PLUMMER, DAVENPORT, FOWLER. 
SEATED— BROOKS, C. GALLOWAY, J. W. YOUNG, JONES, TATE, NELSON, 
COMBS, WEEMS. 



REVIEW OF SECOND 

SEASON OF FOOTBALL 

— 

The Majors ended their second sea- 
son in the football world last Thurs- 
day when they battled the University 
of T e nnessee Doctors from Memphis 
to the close score of 14 to 0 in favor 
of the “medicos.” From the number 
of games won, our season has been a 
failure, for we hav e won only one 
game — that with the Mississippi Nor- j 
mal Yellow Jackets; hut when every) 
thing is taken into consideration the 
season has been a success in many 
ways. Coach Freeland came to Mill- 
saps with a high reputation and lived 
j up to it far above many expectations. 
He took a hunch of green men who 
kn e w very little football and shaped 
it into a machine such that when the 
final whistle of the season blew it had 
gained the admiration of many for 
the stiff fight it had put up against ' 
heavy odds. This same fighting spirit i 
has be e n with the team during the 
entire season. Although completely 
outclassed in many games, they j 
gained the hearts of the spectators by 
their brave stand and their clean foot- 
ball. Everywhere the Majors have | 
play e d this year they have lived up to 
the traditional clean sportsmanship 
that has always been at Millsaps. We j 
are proud of the fact that the college 
has such men to represent it in the 
football world. 

The Majors opened th e season by 
tackling the Howard College eleven 
in Birmingham. Howard crushed the 
lighter team and ran up a 45 to 0 
scorp. The team was in no condition 
(Continued on page 6) 



THE PORPLE AND 
WHITE WARRIORS 



“Ek” Windham (Captain & Center) 
played his usual steady game this sea- 
son. There is nothing flashy about 
“Ek’s” playing, but he is always there 
when it comes to putting the fight 
into the game and playing steady 
football. “Ek” was mentioned for the 
All-State Team. 

“Ben” Galloway (Quarter) seems to 
have been the find of the season, for 
his passing in nearly all the games 
played was excellent and at times his 
broken field running was flashy. “Ben's” 
forty-five yard run against the U. of 
Tenn. Doctors wgs one of his best 
pieces of work during the season. Gall- 
oway is very light for a college team, 
but his good head, and fighting spirit 
have made him a very valuable man 
as quarterback which was the most 
difficult position Coach had to fill. 

“Breezy” Reeves (Fullback) had the 
misfortune to have to undergo an oper- 
ation early in the season that kept 
him out of all the games except the 
first game, with Howard. Reeves 
played a great game at full last year 
and had he been able to play this 
year the team would have been strong- 
er. 

Campbell (End) has proven to be a 
utility player, having played every 
place on the line except center. His 
greatest asset is tackling and getting 
down under punts. The Panthers can 
testify to that fact. Jimmy plays a 
hard game and is game to the core. 

(Continued on page 3) 



« 

Millsaps 


0 


FOOTBALL RESULTS— 

Howard 45 


1921 

at Birmingham 


Millsaps 


0 


Ole Miss 49 


at 


Oxford 


Millsaps 


29 


Normal 0 


at 


Jackson 


Millsaps 


7 


Birmingham-Southern 7 


at 


Jackson 


Millsaps 


0 


Miss. College 56 


at 


Jackson 


Millsaps 


7 


Centenary 21 


at 


Shreveport 


Millsaps 


0 


U. of Tenn. Doctors 14 


at 


Jackson 



MAJORS THANKSGIVING 



Final Battle of the Season 
Brings Good Fame to 
Game Millsaps Team 

Those who were privileged to attend 
the football game Thanksgiving Day 
between the Majors and the Doctors 
from the University of Tennessee Med- 
ical College, witnessed one of the best, 
demonstrations of football seen on the 
local gridiron this season. Although 
defeated 14 to 0, the Millsaps team 
put up a fight against Bert Hodge’s 
undefeated Doctors that will long re- 
main in the memory of the various 
Tennessee players and the spectators. 
All dope on this game was completely 
upset, since it was expected that the 
Doctors would score at least sixty 
points, they having defeated Ole Miss 
by a score of 26 to 6. 

As it was, the Purple and White goal 
was threatened only once after the 
first quarter, the Majors seemingly 
growing stronger on the offensive and 
defensive as the game progressed. The 
Orange and White goal was nearly 
reached by the local boys twice. The 
first time was in the fourth quarter 
following a dazzling mixture of line 
bucks and forward passes over the 
line, which brough the Majors within 
fifteen yards of the coveted chalk line. 
Again about ten minutes later, Gallo- 
way received a 50 yard punt from Ri- 
ley’s boot, and returned it more than 
60 yards, finally being forced out of 
bounds on the Tennessee 15 yard line 
by fullback Schwill. A line buck net- 
ted three more yards, but the whistle 
(Continued on page 6) 



LAMBDACHI PETITIONERS 
OCCOPY HOJJSEjWEST ST, 

Are Pushing Plans to Se- 
cure Recognition at An- 
nual Assembly 

The local Alpha Theta Chi Society, 
organized at Millsaps College, in Feb- 
ruary, 1921, for the purpose of seeking 
admission to the Lambda Chi Alpha 
Fraternity, has at last been successful 
in its attempts to secure suitable 
quarters. Since last spring, resident 
members of the society have been un- 
tiring in their efforts to secure a 
house, but due to the anomalous con- 
ditions prevailing in the real estate 
situation, nothing suitable was found 
available. The society has been some- 
what restricted in its activity on this 
account, but plans to make its greatest 
showing of strength when the Frater- 
nity’s Convention meets next month. 

The Lambda Chi Alpha Annual As- 
sembly will convene, December 28- 
January 1, in the Hotel Adolphus, 
Dallas, Texas. Alpha Theta Chi ex- 
pects to have two or more represen- 
tatives there. The Society’s Informal 
Petition was passed last May. A print- 
ed Formal Petition was gotten out 
during the summer, and it is planned 
to issue a supplement to this within 
(Continued on page 2) 




2 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



i • < 



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REVISED FACULTY RULES 
ABSEICESJROM CLASS 

The Following Rules Were 
Adopted November 
28th, 1921 



1. Each student is permitted to 
have one absence in each class in each 
term of twelve weeks for which he 
shall not be required to account. 

2. For unexcused absences an ex- 
tra examination shall be given within 
five weeks after the beginning of each 
half-term. No grade higher than 70% 
may be recorded for such an exam- 
ination, and the grade given shall be 
credited as the recitation grade for 
each of the days which the student 
has missed from class. 

3. Ministerial students while ab- 
sent on pastoral duty, students absent 
from Jackson while representing the 
College, and students presenting satis- 
factory evidence of sickness shall be 
excused for such absences, and no ex- 
amination shall be required of them 
for the same. 

4. Evidence of sickness shall be 
provided in the form of a physician’s 
certificate specifying the time of the 
sickness, and filed with a petition for 
excuse with the Secretary of the Fac- 
ulty as soon as the student resumes 
attendance on classes. 

5. The Secretary of the Faculty 
shall report at the bi-weekly meeting 
of the Faculty a list of those whose 
absences are covered by a physician’s 
certificate. 

6. Any student whose absences are 
not accounted for by a physician’s 
certificate shall be reported by the 
professors in writing to the President 
at the bi-weekly meeting of the Facul- 
ty. 

7. The penalty for absences from 
Chapel shall be five demerits for’each 
unexcused absence. 

Galloway Election for 

Last Three Terms 



(Continued from page 1) 
President, W. N. Ware; Vice-Presi- 
dent, E. O. Baird; Secretary, M. H. 
McCall; Assistant Secretary, T. J. 
Ray, Jr. 

On November 25th, the Gallowayans 
met for the regular program. In the 

I 

absence of the declaimer and the 
orator, the regular debate was tl^e 
first number. The question w r as, 
Resolved: That Millsaps College 

should adopt a uniform to be worn by 
the students. Messrs. L. B. Sharp 
and M. S. Watson upheld the affirma- 
tive. The example of other schools, 
the economy in money, low washing 
bills, and the neatness and uniformity 
of such clothes formed the chief argu- 
ments of these gentlemen. Messrs. M. 
Burkes and J. Edgar Lee defended the 
negative. The inevitable result of 
militarism as exampled in Germany 
and Belhaven, the non-economy in 
price, and the high washing bills en- 
abled the negative to make their stand. 
The decision favored the affirmative. 

Messrs. “Senator” Gore and “Rare 
ole Ben” Johnson opposed Drs. M. I. 
Honeycutt and T. Jackson Ray, Jr. in 
the discussion as to w r hich would im- 
pel man the further, the love of money 
or the love of women. The society as 
a whole decided in favor of the love 
of women. 



Fresh. Young — “Why isn’t there a 
Sears Roebuck catalogue in the li 
brary?” 



Absences make the marks grow 
rounder. 



SUFFRAGET IF FIRST 
ORDER VISjTS COLLEGE 

Miss Hill, of National Wo- 
man’s Party, Presents 
Plans 

Tuesday morning at Chapel, the stu- 
dents of Millsaps had the pleasure of 
hearing Miss Elsie Hill of Connecticut. 
Miss Hill, who is the chairman of the 
Executive Committee of the National 
Woman’s Party, is on a lecture tour 
for that organization, to bring about 
the passage of the Woman’s Party 
Bill of Rights. 

Miss Hill explained the provisions 
of this proposed amendment. The 
main point of the amendment is that 
women shall have the same rights, 
privileges and immunities under the 
law as men. In other words, women 
will be able to hold any offices that 
men hold, to serve on juries, to have 
the choice of domicile, residence and 
name. 

Miss Hill particularly stressed the 
fact that women, holding the same 
positions, such as school teachers, 
should draw 7 the same salaries as men. 

Miss Hill also said that if the wo- 
man got the same rights as the man, 
the women would also have the same 
responsibilities under the law as men. 
She also explained the National A- 
mendment which says that “no polit- 
ical, civil or legal disabilities or in- 
equalities on account of sex, or on ac- 
count of marriage unless applying a- 
like to both sexes, shall exist within 
the United States or any place sub- 
ject to their jurisdiction.” 

At the conclusion of her talk. Miss 
Hill presented to the library a book 
on the struggles of women for suf- 
frage entitled “Jailed For Freedom”. 



Lambda Chi Petitioners 
Occupy House West St. 

(Continued from page 1) 
the next week. The correspondence 
with the national officers of Lambda 
Chi Alpha and other members of the 
fraternity seems to indicate that the 
aspirations of the local club have, up 
to date, been favorably considered. 

The good will of the existing organ- 
izations in the College is very much 
sought, and a continuation of the sup- 
port and hearty friendliness hereto- 
fore manifested by such, is considered 
by the society its most vital requisite 
of success. 

The following second year men have 
been elected into the organization: H. 
A. Stovall, Arthur S. Kennington, and 
John Simms. 



Red — “Where can I put this suit 
case?” 

Blue — "Sorry, sir, but the ice box is 
full.” 



She — “Do unto others as you would 
have others do unto you.” He kissed 
her. 



After Xmas we may agree with Mr. 
Edison that w r e are “Amazingly ig- 
norant”. 



Prof. — "Where is the alimentary 
canal?” 

Fresh — “Between North and South 
America.” 



We think that the best way to re- 
duce the Navies is to have another 
war. 



Freshman Cook says, “The girls 
have clocks on their stockings so they 
can see how fast the seams run.” 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



THE PURPLE & WHITE 
WARRIORS 



(Continued from page 1) 

He was mentioned for the All-State 
Eleven. 

"Dud” Culley (Guard) received in- 
juries in the Howard game that kept 
him out of the first games of the sea- 
son. It was not until the Thanksgiving 
game that he was able to get back 
into the game. Culley’s faithfulness 
and his “bull dog” tenacity make him 
a very valuable man and his presence 
in the Purple & White line would have 
greatly strengthened it. 

“Red” Carr’s (Halfback) first game 
was with the Normal College. In this 
game he showed promise of making 
a splendid backfield man, for he pull- 
ed off several good brokenfield runs. 
He suffered from an injured leg all 
the season however, and was never 
at his best. His work in the Birming- 
ham-Southern game was fine. It was 
he who placed the ball in scoring posi- 
tion for the touchdown that the Ma- 
jors made. 

“Dub” Fowler played a good game 
at half during the first part of the 
season, but he suffered from injuries 
that kept him out of the majority of 
the games. There is not any man on 
the squad who has more natural abil- 
ity than Fowler. 

“Scrap Iron” J. W. Young (Half- 
back) proved his ability by sticking 
by the team throughout the season. 
He is light, fairly fast, and hard as 
nails. After having played on the 
scrubs for nearly the entire season, 
he was shifted to the regulars and 
proved his worth. 

“Snow” Stovall (Tackle) was the 
man who made the first touchdown of 
■•he season and won the hat offered 
by the alumni association. His punt- 
ing during the entire season was far 
above the average, and by next year 
he ought to rank with the best in the 
state. Tackling and snatching passes 
is his “long suit.” 

“Pat” McNair (End) played a dandy 
game at end. "Pat” specialized in 
snagging passes and getting down un- 
der punts. During the first few games 
he was weak in tackling, but in the 
last games of the season he showed 
wonderful improvement in that line. 

Brooks (End) was new at the game 
of football, but rapidly developed into 
a good tackier and has promise of 
making a great end. He is fast, gritty 
and has the weight to hold his own 
with the best. His work in the games 
played was not spectacular, but he 
played good steady football. 

Musselwhite (Fullback) was shifted 
from end to full after Reeves was out 
of the game. Although the backfield 
position was new to “Mussel”, he 
rapidly developed into a good line 
plunger, and when it comes to tack- 
ling he has no superior on the team. 

McEwen (Tackle) will always be re- 
membered as the hero of the Panther 
game. Mack made the touchdown that 
tied the score with the Panthers. His 
playing at tackle during the Miss, 
game was good. It was during this 
game that he had the misfortune to 
break his leg. He was mentioned as 
tackle for the All-State Eleven. 

Scott’s (Guard) playing at guard 
this year has been good. “Scotty” 
will go down in history for his work 
in the U. of Tenn. Doctor tilt, for the 
way in which he played against "Jit- 
ney” Ford, the renowned Kentucky 
giant, who played the entire game for 
Centre last year when they made such 
a wonderful showing against the great 
Crimson machine of Harvard. From 
the manner in which Scott handled 
Ford, you would not have known 
whether Ford was in the game or not. 

King’s (Tackle) work at the begin- 



ning of the season was good, but owing 
to injuries he was forced to quit prac- 
tice. He should make us a good man 
next year. 

Tate (Quarter) played in several of 
the games early in the season. He 
is handicapped by being very light for 
a college team, but in the games that 
he played as quarter he showed abil- 
ity at running the team and also game- 
ness. 

“Lightning” Davenport (Tackle) al- 
though he received little encourage- 
ment early in the season, stuck it 
out to the last, and got to play in a 
number of games as tackle. His de- 
fensive work was always good, and 
although he is not as fast as his name 
indicates he always manages to get 
his tall rawbone self in the way of 
the enemy’s offensive. When ne does, 
things break up. 

“Rabbit” Overall (Halfback) proved 
to be a fast backfield man. Overall is 
new at the game of carrying the pig- 
skin, but from the way in which he 
took in the coaching and the manner 
in which he handles himself on the 
field we believe that there are great 
things in store for him. His work 
against the Doctors was especially 
good. 

“Pardner” Honeycutt’s (Tackle) 
playing in the line improved as the 
season wore on. “Honey” did not get 
much start, but when the big Louisia- 
na boy did get to hitting them he made 
a big impression. His playing at tack- 
le against the Panthers was one of the 
features of the game. 

Combs (Quarter) did not get to play 
in many of the games, but his work 
at quarter was good. He and Tate 
worked the scrubs most of the time 
and it was their faithfulness and will- 
ingness that enabled the scrubs to 
give the Varsity the necessary scrim- 
maging. 

Nelson (Center) was ineligible to 
play this year owing to the fact that 
he played baseball at S. P. U. last 
year. His work on the scrub team 
was excellent. He will make us a 
good man next year. 

N. C. Young played in several games 
as end and halfbgek. His work was 
not flashy, but he gave promise of 
developing into a good player. 

W. Galloway and Plummer, although 
they failed to make any trips or to 
play in any games, proved their loy- 
alty by sticking the entire season out 
and always reporting to practice on 
time and ready to do their best. Their 
loyalty helped the team very much. 



Lamar Society Selects 

Freshman Debaters 

(Continued from page 1) 
one to make, but the judges decided 
in favor of the negative. 

The election of speakers for the 
freshmen debates was held; Allred and 
Flowers wdre elected for the first de- 
bate. and Gunn and Watkins for the 
second. The Lamars have a bunch of 
freshmen this year whom they feel 
they can count upon to uphold the 
Lamar standard and win in the inter- 
society debates, in spite of their 
numerical inferiority to the other so- 
ciety. 

Professor Harrell, alumnus of the 
Lamar Literary Society, was present 
and responded to the call for a speech. 
His talk was not long but was of in- 
terest to the younger generation of 
Lamars. He spoke on the benefits to 
be derived from the study of parlia- 
mentary law, and then gave a quota- 
tion from the poetical works of G. L. 
Harrell. Expressions of surprise were 
heard that he could ever have with- 
drawn his attention from the stars 
long enough to compose poetry, but 
there the poetry was, a proof that he 
has no single-track mind. 



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The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 




CORRECT STYLES in FOOTWEAR 



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I THE DANIEL STUDIO! 

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When Purchasing Athletic Equipment 
Insist Upon 

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Prof. Harrell — “Give an example of 
vibration.” 

Manning — "A ride in a Ford.” 



FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 



We imagine we had a lot more to 
be thankful for Thanksgiving than we 
will have next week. 



Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 



Prof. — “How is artificial silk made?” 
Soph. Corley — “By artificial silk 
worms.” 



JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 



Dr. Sullivan — “What is H?” 
Cross — "An abbreviation.” 



Notice to Freshmen. When having 
picture taken keep mouth closed if 
you want a small picture. 

Those taking special exams are 
thankful there is only one “fe” in pro- 
fessor. 



A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
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4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 j 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Fred Lotterhos 

Athletic Editor— — Walter Stokes 

Associate Editor _E. K. Windham 

Associate Editor ____ ...Mack Swearingen 

Associate Editor Miss Daley Crawford 

Associate Editor — — J. W. Sells 

Associate Editor __ M. M. McGowan 

REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, A, L. Joyner, D. F. McNeil, H. 
L. Villee. 



MANAGEMENT 

Business Manager ______ — — H. B. Collins 

Assistant Business Manager — Geo. Watts 

Circulation Manager — __ — G. K. Hebert 



THE END OF THE FOOTBALL SEASON 

Thanksgiving Day marked the end of Millsaps’ second football 
season. This season has been satisfactory in many respects, although 
we lost a majority of the games. The seven games played have de- 
monstrated the clean sportmanship, the fighting spirit, and the good 
promise of the Majors. To Coach Freeland is due great praise for 
the record which has been made. 

It was well known that our team had little chance to win many 
games in its second year of football. Nevertheless, our men went into 
the game with full determination to do the best. The squad worked 
faithfully through the training period and on through the entire 
season. Consequently, much praise has come to them. Although 
outweighed in nearly every game, the Majors gave a good account 
of themselves. Everywhere they have gone, they are well remem- 
bered as a hard fighting team. The student body and the alumni 
are proud of every man that wore the purple and white. 

No amount of praise is too much for the man that led the team 
through the season. Coach Freeland is loved by every man on the 
team. Not only is he loved, but he is respected. The men know’ 
that he is one of the best football coaches in the South. They also 
know that he stands squarely for clean athletics. With Coach Free- 
land to head our team, we can count on making a victorious record 
in the near future. 

Football is well established at Millsaps College now’, and it re- 
mains only for all students and alumni to work toward making a 
better and better team. The hardest part of the path is past. The 
first two years, the time of discouragement and defeat, are behind 
us. Furthermore, no man of this year’s team will be ineligible next 
year. With these things in mind, we can honestly predict success 
for the 1922 season. 

We congratulate the Majors on what they have done and what j 



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WE SERVE THE BEST 
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they shall do. 



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Royal Hotel Building 



ACADEMY FOOTBALL 

The Millsaps Academy football team has made a good record 
this year. Although they lost a majority of the games, they were 
playing against the very best teams in this section. Tw r o college 
teams and several more than ordinary prep school and high school 
teams were on the schedule. The Academy has shown hard fighting 
qualities this year. The men on the team deserve a great deal of 
credit for what they have done. 

A number of the best players will be in college next year, and 
ought to make names for themselves there. We earnestly hope that 
all of them will be at Millsaps College in 1922, and will make as good 
Majors as they have Preps. 



The Purple and White was not published last week in order that 
the number of issues might not get ahead of the schedule. The issue 
of this week is the last one for this term, as the paper will not appear 
during examination week. After exams, the Purple and White will 
appear regularly, as it has up until now. 



The students have pledged over five hundred dollars toward the 
building of a temporary gym. in case that project goes through. 



STORE FOR MEN Jackson , Miss 

218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 

»> : - =•:• 

Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pies, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE” 

<• ■ ■ — ■ ■ '> 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 







JftralforO CLotlir*- 



When you see well dressed men I 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

g>tratforb Clotfteg 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




B 13° 

The Flavor Lasts! 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 



SCIENCE NALL SCENE OF 
SUNDAY SCHOOL PARTI 



Coach Freeland’s Talk F Ma- 
tures Evening; Foot- 
ball Team Guests 



Dr. J. M. Sullivan entertained the 
members of The Open Air Sunday 
School Class of the Galloway Memorial 
Church at the Science Hall on last 
Monday evening from seven until nine 
o’clock. The class had as their guests 
Coach Freeland and the members of 
the football team. 

Dr. Sullivan showed the members 
and their guests pictures of historical 
interest, which included pictures of 
the Bible land and pictures of this 
country that were of interest to all 
present. 

After the picture show Dr. Sullivan 
called on Coach Freeland for a short 
talk. He responded in his genial way, 
and made one of the best talks that 
the men present have ever had the 
pleasure of listening to. Among other 
things he told of the “fighting spirit” 
showed by the men on the football 
team. While they knew that they 
were fighting an uphill fight, and in 
the presence of all kinds of odds, they 
fought harder for Millsaps. He further 
said that the football team and all 
kinds of athletics are great factors 
in building up the character of a stud- 
ent, that they give the best insight 
into a man’s character, and teach 
him to hold himself under control 
against great odds. He said that he 
could go to a school and watch a 
game between that school and another 
school, and watch the student bodies’ 
action at the game, and he could get 
a good idea of the moral life of that 
school. It would have been fine for 
all of the students to have heard the 
talk made by Coach Freeland. 

Last but not least, the guests were 
served ice cream and cake for re- 
freshments. 



“EXAMINATIONS” 

Beforg. 

Long faces, expressions bored; 

All nice plans immediately floored. 
Cross moods, everything wrong; 
What’s the trouble? Exams coming 
Tong— 

During. 

Book in hand, midnight oil, 

So much cramming we nearly spoil. 
Industry written on our brow; 

What’s the trouble? Exams here now- 

After. 

Hearts so light we feel right silly. 

No more work for “Weary Willie!” 
Away with study and text books punk 
The things are over even tho we flunk. 
Moral. 

The pesky things are too much trou- 
ble. 

And all that cramming is only a bub- 
ble. 

Which bursts as soon as th e y are 
o’er. 

Oh, come now! Let’s not have any 
more ! — Exchange. 

There are telephone lines and clothes 
lines. 

Of lines the world is full, 

But the line of most advantage, 

Is the line of BULL. 



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WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 




The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 

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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

Property of Athletic Association ^ 

Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

S S 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
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and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 




\ 



We have It from “Fish” Donald that 
the reason that he quarrels with his 
girl is that he likes to kiss and make 
up. He says he likes the kiss hut 
not the make up. 



Prof. Patch— “Why are you so late 
for class?” 

Fitzhugh — “I think I must have over 
washed myself.” 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




Review of Second Doctors Overcome 

Season of Football Majors Thanksgiving 



(Continued from page 1) 

for a game when it left Jackson, not 
having had sufficient practice to al- 
low Coach Freeland to really select 
an eleven. This d e feat at the hand 
of the Howard collegians has been 
partly blotted out, since the Birming- 
ham-Southern Panthers defeated them 
and we tied the Panthers. 

There is not much that we can say 
about the “Ole Miss” game (although 
wg may know a lot). Ole Miss ran 
wild on her own back yard and de- 
feated us by the overwhelming score 
of 49 to 0. However, it was in this 
game that Coach Freeland’s system 
of passes got to working. With C. 
Galloway doing the passing the Ma- 
jors completed twelve out of four- 
teen attempts. 

Th e n came the game with the Miss. 
Normal Yellow Jackets. In this game 
the Majors got right and defeated 
the Pedagogues by a 29 to 0 score. The 
passing and broken figld running of 
Galloway featured this game, al- 
though the entire team played good 
ball. The first touchdown of the sea- 
son was made in the first quarter 
when Stovall received a pass from 
Galloway and ran fifteen yards across 
the goal line. McNair, Fowl e r and 
Galloway made the other touchdowns. 

The game with the Birmingham- 
Southern Panthers surprised many for 
we battled th e fierce Panther of the 
smoky city to a seven to seven tie. 
The Panthers entered the gam e a two 
to one favorite over the Majors, but 
the Purple and White lin e put up 
such great defensive play that the 
Birmingham boys did well to get a 
tie. The work of McEwen in this 
gam e was the feature, for it was he 
who crossed the Panther goal on a 
trick tackle play in the last quarter 
and enabled the Majors to tie the 
score. 

The Armistice game with the Mis- 
sissippi Choctaws ran true to dope 
and the Majors went down by an over- 
whelming snore before the mighty 
“Goat” Hale & Co. The only thing 
of interest as far as the Majors are 
concerned was the gallant defense the 
team made in the last quarter when 
an entir e new team was sent in 
against them. 

Centenary pulled a surprise by giv- 
ing our team a defeat when they met 
us on the gridiron for the first time 
at Shreveport. The score was 21 to 7. 
Campbell ran fifty yards through the 
entire Centenary team after receiving | 
a fake kick off. for Millsaps touch- 
down. Galloway kicked goal. 

The Thanksgiving game with U. of 
Tenn. Doctors was perhaps the best 
game that the team played. A full 
account of the game is printed in this 
issue. 

This last game ended a season that 
has been full of surprises, disap- 
pointments, but not discouragements, 
and one that shows the possibilities 
of putting Millsaps in the football 
spotlight. 



Prof. Sullivan — “What are cosmet- 
ics?” 

Nelson — “Peach preservers.” 



Its a wise cork that knows its own 
pop. 



(Continued from page 1) 

ending the game sounded, and ended 
the march of the Millsaps men that 
would surely have gone on over for e 
touchdown had as much as one minute 
of time been left to play. 

Too much praise cannot be given 
to Coach Freeland, the man who took 
a bunch of green material and moulded 
a fighting football machine out of it 
in the short space of two months 
time. The team has not won as many 
as half of its games this season, but 
considering that nearly every game 
scheduled was with a college that had 
had football teams for years past, the 
showing made by the Majors has been 
remarkable in this, their second year 
in intercollegiate football. The larg- 
est score piled up against them was 
the 56 to 0 score registered by Mis- 
sissippi College. During the entire 
season, the Majors scored 43 points 
as against 192 for their opponents. 

When the game Thursday first start- 
ed, it looked like a walk-away for the 
Tennessee aggregation. Riley, playing 
left half for the Doctors, received a 
punt and eluded the entire Purple and 
White team, racing forty yards for a 
touchdown. He repeated this feat 
twice within ten more minutes, but his 
efforts were made of no avail through 
the tactics of his team-mates in hold- 
ing, thus drawing a penalty instead 
of credit for touchdowns. The Majors 
tried gallantly to shake the jinx that 
seemed to hang on to each of them, 
whether playing on the offensive or de- 
fensive. But the fierce attack of the 
Doctors swept them aside, and Beck 
intercepted a short forward pass and 
ran twenty-five yards for their second 
and last touchdown. Riley I kicked 
goal in each instance. 

In the second quarter, the best that 
the Orange and White could do to- 
wards scoring was an attempted field 
goal from placement on the 35 yard 
line; but this was unsuccessful. The 
work of Galloway, McNair and Mussel- 
white stood out as the best for the 
Majors; while Riley towered above all 
of his team-mates in demonstrated 
ability. The showing made by the 
Millsaps football men in this game 
gives promise of the development of 
a formidable team in the near future. 



The lineup is as follows: 



U. Tenn. (14) 


Position Millsaps (0) 


Laird 


. L. E. 


McNair 


Carman (C) 


. L. T. 


Stovall 


Ford 


L. G. 


Davenport 


Birk 


... C. . 


(C) Windham 


Graham 


. R. G. 


Scott 


Plesofsky 


. R. T. 




Melvin 


R. E. 




Beck 


.... Q. .. 




Riley 


I.. H. 




A. Carman 


. R. H. 


Overall 


Schwill 


V. 




Score by periods — 




U. of T. Doctors 


.14 0 0 0 14 


Millsaps 




.0 0 0 0 0 


Touchdowns- 


—Riley, 


Beck. Goal af- 



ter touchdowns— Riley 2. 

Substitutes — U. T. Doctors — Coles 
for Melvin, Doak for Schwill, Rayner 
for Birk, Schwill for Doak, Gardner 
for A. Carmen. 

'BTlsaps — Culley for Scott. 

Referee — Caylor (Miss. College.) 
Umpire — Howard (Northwestern) 
^ead-linesman — Roberts (Chicago) 
Time of quarters — 14 minutes. 



Ijrtatmas drifts 



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DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

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• 

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25-26, with samples of the NEWEST 
creations in JEWELRY and NOVELTIES 

SEND FOR “A GIFT BOOK FOR MODERN GREEKS” 



❖ 

R. H. GREEN 

Wholesale Grocer 




Feed Manufacturer Cold Storage 



Jackson, Miss. 




“CHICK” NELSON AND 
ACADEMY FOOTBALL 



CITY SHOE SHOP 

■ i » • . 

Free shine to Millsaps Students for 



A review of football at Millsaps 
would by no means be complete un- 
less mention were made of the man 
who for four years has led Academy 
athletics with such zeal and skill. We 
refer to Nelson, known to every one 
on the campus as “Chick.” “Chick” 
has been the leader in athletics at the 
Academy since his entrance • there 
four years ago. He is known by all 
to stand for the best in athletics, loy- 
alty to the team, untiring work, and 
fight. We need him in the College 
next year. He is the type of man so 
sorely needed to build up our growing 
football squad into a success winning 
machine. The Coach’s opinion of him 
could not be better summed up than 
in this remark: “I am going to make 
the best passer in the South out of 
Chick next year,” Nelson is not the 
only promising athlete developed in 
the Academy. Kornegay, Reynolds, 
Stainton, S'utton, Berry and a number 
of others come in for their just share 
of commendation. 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMS. 

Dec. a, A. M. — German A. Spanish I, 
Greek A, Education I, Math. III. 

Dec. 5, P. M.— Bible I, English II, 
Psychology, Spanish II. 

Dec. 6, A. M.— English III, Math. II. 
Education X, German I, Astronomy, 
French I. 

Dec. 6, P. M. — Greek I, Education 
VII, Biology I, Latin III, Latin A. 

Dec. 7, A. M. — English I, Economics, 
Logic. 

Dec. 7, P. M. — French A, Physics I, 
Bible II, Sociology, Geology. 

Dec. 8, A. M. — Math. I, Latin II, 
Chemistry II, Political Science. 

Dec. 8, P. M. — Latin I, French II, 
Greek II, English IV, History II, Lat. 
B. 

Dec. 9, A. M. — Chemistry I. 

Dec. 9, P. M. — Conflicts. 

Dec. 10, A. M. — History I, History 
of Philosophy. 

Dec. 10, P. M. — Conflicts. 
Examinations — A. M., 9-12 o’clock ; 
P. M., 2-5 o’clock. 



every job of shoe repairing. 

' 1 1 n*- * • 

306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 



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r "> ■- ~ r3a 




KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 






Comics, Cartons, Commercial News 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



Frank T. Scott Charlie Scott 



SCOTT & SCOTT 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 



JACKSON, MISS. 



Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 
JACKSON, MISS. 



Tate — “I want to do something big 
and clean before I die.” 

Watkins — “Try washing an ele- 
phant.” 

V 

Prof. Sullivan — “What is a vacuum?” 
N e lson — “I know Prof. Sullivan, I 
have it in my head but just can’t 
think of it now.” 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 



CENTENARY DEFEATS 
MAJORS 21 TO 1 

Campbell’s Spectacular Run 
For Touchdown Fea- 
tures Game 

Centenary pulled a very unpleasant 
surprise two weeks ago when they 
took the Majors under cover over at 
Shreveport by the score of 21 to 7. 
Millsaps was due to win a victory, but 
the Louisiana Methodists took them by 
surprise and gave them an unexpected 
defeat. After an all night trip the Ma- 
jors evidently lacked the “Pep” to 
make a good contest out of the game, 
and therefore Centenary had an easy 
time. Centenary did most of her ad- 
vancing over the Millsaps line. The 
feature of the game as far as Mill- 
saps was concerned was the run made 
by Jimmy Campbell. To begin the 
second half Centenary . attempted a 
fake kick off. Campbell snatched up 
the ball and raced through the entire 
Centenary team for fifty yards and 
touchdown. Galloway kicked goal. 



Musslewhite’s Athletes De- 
feat Combs’ Crew, 19-0 



THE HOUSE WARMING 



’Twas a fair Tuesday evening, and 
all thru the Hut, 

Not a creature was stirring, not even 
a “Nut,” 

The place looked deserted; the floor — 
it was hare 

But just wait till four when the crowd 
would be there. 

The girls in gay costumes, with bun- 
dles galore. 

Came trooping in crowds with the 
promise that more 

Were coming in later to join in the 
fray. 

For this special event was “house- 1 
warming day,” 

We were told that the kitchen was 
sorely in need 

Of pots and of pans and of lots more 
indeed — 

When we had a party we scrambled 
around. 

For knives, forks, and glasses did 
nowhere abound, 

Blit had to' be borrowed from folks 
far and near. 

Who had a vast store — and you bet 
we felt queer! 

The book-case was empty; no books 
could we read 



For a runner the table was sorely in 
need. 

But now all our troubles were going 
to vanish. 

For here came the gifts that our great 
gloom would banish — 

The “Y” girls were never so generous 
and nice 

As on this occasion when they could 
“shine” twice, 

’Cause they not only furnished the 
Hut far and wide, 

They gave a cute program and party 
beside, 

Mrs. Bowen, Mrs. Watkins and others 
were there ; 

We had speeches and songs; oh! ’twas 
quite an affair! 

We had a good time and we hope 
we’ll repeat it — 

The Hut thanks us all for the way 
we did treat it — 

It just looks so nice you hardly would 
know it — 

The Governor’s Mansion is even be- 
low it — 

NOW! 



Mr. Richardson says he IS always 
| getting Lloyd George, Harold Lloyd 
and Celluloid mixed up. 



ATTENTION ARTISTS! 



If you have any artistic ability, 
pl e ase see Daley Crawford, art editor 
of the Bobashela. Originality is one 
of the most desirable elements in the 
make-up of a good college annual and 
the Staff is making every effort to 
put out the best annual in the his- 
tory of the college. W e are however, 
dependent upon the under-classmen 
for a good deal of the material and 
especially the drawings. Make a 
trial and see if your name will not ap- 
pear on at least one drawing in the 
’22 Bobashela. 



Ducky — "A fool can ask more ques- 
tions than a wise man can answer.” 
Freshman — “No wonder so many of 
us flunk on exams.” 



Soph — “The day wore on” 
Fresh — “What did it wear?” 
Soph — "The close of day, Nut.” 



Jimmie Burrows — “My girl is full of 
puppy love.” 

Bill Combs— "Puppy Love? Hot Dog.” 



The Eternal Triangle — Two Sophs 
and a Freshman. 



\ 



Outplaying their opponents in every 
respect, the picked “11” from Mussel- 
white’s section of freshman athletics 
defeated Combs’ team in a grid con- 
test last Friday by the score of 19 to 
0. Combs’ team underrated Mussle- 
white’s men, and when Willie Poole 
began to carry the ball around the 
ends for 5 and 10 yards the Combites 
lost hope and incidentally lost, the. 
game. The star for Comb’s outfit was 
Bailey. Although he was not allowed 
to cross the much coveted goal line, 
he got away with many broken field 
runs that made the vast throng that 
witnessed the game hold its breath. 
Had his line and interference been 
as perfect as Poole’s the result of the 
game might have been different. 

There were no other stars in the 
game, though from the way both teams 
played there seems to be some good 
material for football next year. 



Line up: 



Combs’ team (0) 
Fitzhugh 


L. E. 


Musslewhite’s 
team (19) 
Cook 


Phillips, 

Cranford 


L. T. 


Martin 


Warren 


L. G. 


Sandlin 


Jones 


C. 


Lumpkin 


Shanks 


R. G. 


Watson 


French 


R. T. 


Sharp 


Waits 


R. E. 


Fletcher 


Spiva 


Q. B. 


Richardson 


Harris, 

Garber 


L. H. 


Cunningham 


Stewart 


R. H. 


McCormick 


Bailey 


F. B. 


Poole 



EPITAPH 

Here lies the body of Jim Lake — 
Tread softly all who pass: 

He thought his foot was on the brake. 
But it was on the gas. 

- —Ex. 

Poor Jim Lake has gone afar 
We know not where he went 
But probably he has no car 
To furnish his amusement. 




hittorj or Croohs Tclt 



How Were X-Rays Discovered? 

S IR James Mackenzie Davidson visited Professor Roentgen to find 
out how he discovered the X-rays. 

Roentgen had covered a vacuum tube, called a Hittorf or Crookes 
tube, with black paper so as to cut off all its light. About four yards 
away was a piece of cardboard coated with a fluorescent compound. 
He turned on the current in the tube. The cardboard glowed brightly. 

Sir James asked him: “What did you think?” 

“I didn’t think, I investigated,” said Roentgen. He wanted to 
know what made the cardboard glow. C nly planned experiments 
could give the answer. We all know the practical result. Thousands 
of lives are saved by surgeons who use the X-rays. 

Later on, one of the scientists in the Research Laboratory of the 
General Electric Company became interested in a certain phenomenon 
sometimes observed in incandescent lamps. Others had observed it, 
but he, like Roentren, investigated. The result was the discovery 
of new laws governing electrical conduction in high vacuum. 

Another scientist in the came laboratory saw that on the basis of those 
new laws he could build a new tube for producing X-rays more effec- 
tively. This was the Coclidre X-ray tube which marked the greatest 
advance in the X-ray art since the original discovery by Roentgen. 

Thus, scientific investigation of a strange phenomenon led to the 
discovery of a new art, and scientific investigation of another strange 
phenomenon led to the greatest improvement in that art. 

It is for such reasc" that the Research Laboratories of the General 
Electric Company Lie continually investigating, continually exploring 
the unknown. It is new knowledge that is sought. But practical 
results follow in an endless stream, and in many unexpected ways. 



“Stop, Look and Listen” read poor Jim 
But sped along in glory 
If he had known it applied to him 
There’d have been more to this story 



It is time for something to be done; 
the telephone service has gone from 
bad to normal. 



GeneralflElectric 

Company 



General Office 



Schenectady, N. Y. 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Mississippi’s Largest and Most Comfortable 
Theatre 

Friday and Saturday 

POLA NEGRI 
The International Star in 

“ONE ARABIAN NIGHT’’ 

PRICES 25c and 50c 



Ike MAJESTIC 

Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 5, 6 

THOMAS MEIGHAN 
— in — 

“THE CITY OF SILENT MEN’’ 

PRICES 10c and 25c 



PROPER PRESENTATION OF THE 
PHOTO-DRAMATIC ART 

Wednesday-Thursday, Dec. 7, 8 

MARY MILES MINTER 
— in — 

“DON’T CALL ME LITTLE GIRL” 

PRICES 10c and 25c 



ISTRIONE 

Friday-Saturday, Dec. 2, 3 
TOM MIX 
—IN— 

“After Your Own Heart” 



Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 5. C 

“AFTER THE SHOW” 

(ALL STAR) 



Wednesday-Thursday, Dec. 7„ 8 
ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN 
—IN— 

“ Tbe Miracle of Manhattan ’ ’ 



Friday-Saturday, Dec. 9, 10 
CHARLES RAY 
—IN— 

“2 MINUTES TO GO” 

(Its the Football Players' Picture) 

ORCHESTRA 



SHOWS 2 TO 11 P. M. DAILY 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson, Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Style* 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT" SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

ELECTS OFFICERS 



At a recent meeting of the Sopho- 
more Class, officers for the year were 
elected. O. H. S^ott, president of the 
Freshman Class last year, presided. 
The results of the election follow: 

President — J. W. Campbell. 

Vice-President — Maxine Tull. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Rivers Apple- 
white. 

Honor Council — Eleanor Gene Sulli- 
i van. 



R. E. HINES ADDRESSES REGULAR 
“Y” MEETING. 



The Y. M. C. A. meeting of last 
week was more than usually helpful. 
Mr. R. E. Hines, a prominent business 
man of Jackson, came out to deliver 
the address of the evening. He held 
his audience to close attention as he 
talked to the boys in a calm, steady 
manner. The value of the “Heavenly 
Vision” in every day life was Mr. 
Hines’ topic. 

At the close of the meeting, Dr. 
Sullivan announced that on Wednes- 
day, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 
Dr. Morrison from the Methodist Con- 
ference would address the student 
body at the noon hour. 



LOCALS 

Jim Rawies visited on the campus 
this w e eb. 



A large number of the freshmen of 
the college went home for Thanks- 
giving. 



L. J. Calhoun and R. F. Harrell, 
seniors of 1921, were visitors at the 
college last week. Both of them are 
at present in the teaching profession. 



The Phi Mu Stirorlty entertained a 
number of its friends last Wednesday 
evening at the home of Miss Willie 
Spann on Jefferson Street. Only 
girls were present at the party, which 
proved to be a very delightful one. 




“EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE” 



Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A 100^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

United States, Hinds County and City Depository 

Capital paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders' liabilities 200,000.00 

Surplus earned. 225,000.00 

Undivided profits, net 25,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



“BARKER BREAD ” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



ANNOUNCING 

* 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



DR/n/c 



Ihero'Cola 



Mack Swearingen and Dew e y Dear- j 
man went to Ole Miss this week to 
appear before the Rhodes Scholarship i 
Committee in th e interest of their 
candidacy. 

Belhaven College was the scene of 
a very interesting entertainment on the 
night of Thanksgiving. The occasion 
was the annual Thanksgiving recep- 
tion. Many of the Millsaps boys were 
present, and had a very happy time 



Advance Styles in Cards for the 

Christmas -Tide 



Order Now 



Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J. A. HUBER 

The Pi Kappa Alphas announce the 
recent initiation of H. H. Knoblocb 
and J. C. Murray. 



J. W. Moore was forced to withdraw 
from school some time ago on account 
of eye trouble. 



As visitors at chapel on Monday 
morning, the student body received 
the Senior Class of Belhaven. T£es e 
young ladies came ov e r in the interest 
of a recital to be given soon at th e 
Blind Institute. Two of the number 
made speeches, which wer e well re- 
ceived. 

On last Saturday at the chapel hour, 
the Kappa Deltas entertained in- 
formally in th e chapter room. The 
presence of so many of the old stu- 
dents who were home for Thanks- 
giving added much to the pleasure of 
the guests. Sandwich e s and candy 
were served. 



The Methodist Conference is in 
session in Jackson this week. The 
meetings of this body are of course of 
interest to the student body, especial- 
ly to the ministerial students. 



Coach Freeland and his wlte have 
moved into the dormitory recently. 
Their address now is Galloway Hall. 



The Kappa Sigma House was the 
scene of an “open house” Sunday after- 
noon, when the local chapter enter- 
tained its friends and alumni. 



Junior — “1 see tnat your watcn crys- 
tal is broken.” 

Special — “Yes, I put Mildred B’s 
J picture in it.” 





QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, DEC. 16, 1921 No. 11 



DR. MORRISON BRINGS 
MESSAGE 10 MILLSAPS 



His Series of Addresses 
Draw Favorable 
Comment 



“I can take the monkeys off the 
bedposts and the snakes out of your 
shoes.” Such was the surprising de- 
claration of Dr. H. C. Morrison to the 
students of Millsaps. These and many 
other expressions were the features 
of the series of sermons given in the 
chapel week before last. 

The eloquence of these addresses 
and the interesting illustrations were 
what brought about the impossible — 
that is chapel attendance without roll 
call. Class periods were shortened to 
fifty minutes, thus leaving one hour 
for chapel, which came from twelve 
to one. 

Dr. Morrison came to preach to the 
Methodist Conference, which was then 
in session. It was through the influ- 
ence of Bro. Burton that he was able 
to give Millsaps the pleasure of these 
talks. He spoke with the conviction 
and earnestness which have made him 
one of the leading speakers of South- 
ern Methodism. There was a touch of 
the old Kentucky spirit in the aspect 
of the Doctor as he addressed the 
student body. As he told of his ex- 
periences in all parts of the world the 
students seemed touched as they never 
have been before. Then there was 
the forceful application of these ex- 
periences to the life of the sinner. 

The students feel grateful to Dr. 
Morrison and also to those who influ- 
enced him to give them the pleasure 
of hearing him. The student body, 
we feel, has been greatly uplifted by 
the spiritual influence of this prom- 
inent minister of the Gospel. 



EMORY WINS METHO- 
DIST ROAD RACE 



Millsaps Gets Fifth Place — 
Collins Wins 
Medal 



The second. Annual Methodist Four 
Mile Road Race was held at Emory 
University, Atlanta, on the afternoon 
of Saturday, December 3rd. All of the 
Southern Methodist Colleges were in- 
vited to participate in the meet; those 
represented were Emory University, 
Trinity, Wofford, Birmingham-South- 
ern, Randolph-Macon, and Millsaps. 
As everyone expected, Emory repeat- 
ed the performance of last year and 
ran away With the meet. The Emory 
team of four men finished first, second, 
third, and fourth, Stokes, the winner, 
making the four mile jaunt in 22 min- 
utes and 12 seconds. Emory’s score 
was 10 points, the lowest possible. 
The first man to finish counted one 
point, the second, two, and so on until 
the last man, who received 24 points. 

The standing of the teams were as 
follows: Emory, 10; Wofford 39; Bir- 
mingham-Southern 54; Trinity 60; 
Millsaps 64; Randolph-Macon 73. The 
(Continued on page 6) 



METHODIST CONFERENCE 
MEETS HUACKSON 

Number of Items of Busi- 
ness Interesting to 
Students 

Beginning Wednesday, November 30, 
the Methodist people of Jackson were 
the hosts of the Mississippi Annual 
Conference. The official opening ser- 
vice of the Conference was the Com- 
munion Service on Wednesday morn- 
ing. Bishop McMurry impressively 
administered the Sacrament. The roll 
was then called by the Secretary, A. 
F. Watkins. Announcements were 
made that Dr. H. C. Morrison would 
talk to the Conference every morning, 
to the Millsaps student body at noon, 
and to the Conference at Capitol 
Street Church at evening. Not all of 
the rest of the routine business was of 
especial interest to those outside of 
the Conference, but several matters 
were transacted concerning Millsaps 
College and Millsaps men. 

President Reports for Millsaps 
On Friday, Marion Allen, J. L. Car- 
ter, M. K. Miller, I. H. Sells and B. 
H. Williams were received into full 
connection. Some of these will be 
recognized as former Millsaps stud- 
ents. Bishop Murrah, former Presi- 
dent of Millsaps, and now President 
of the Board of Trustees, was a visitor 
to the Conference. Dr. Watkins made 
a fine report for Millsaps, reporting 
an increase in attendance and enlarge- 
ment of the faculty. L. E. Alford was 
elected on the Board of Trustees for 
Millsaps. 

Rev. S. F. Harkey, a graduate of 
Millsaps, and his family have been 
accepted as missionaries to Africa and 
are expected to sail during the coming 
year. Resolutions were passed ex- 
pressing the prayers and interest of 
the Conference for J. L. Neil, who will 
shortly leave for Europe. Bro. Neil 
is also a Millsaps product. Resolu- 
tions were passed to provide for the 
pastoral care of students in both 
Methodist and State institutions of 
learning in Mississippi. The matter 
of changing the Training School from 
Montrose was left open until next 
year despite the fact that Forest and 
Laurel put up strong bids. 

Appointments of Millsaps Men 
The Conference was so crowded 
with business that it was necessary to 
have extra sessions on Saturday after- 
noon, Monday morning and Monday 
afternoon. Crystal Springs was select- 
ed as the next meeting place. Among 
the appointments were the following 
present or recent students of Millsans : 
Georgetown Circuit, J. W. Sells; 
Bonhommie Circuit, A. J. Boyles; 
Leakesville Circuit, S. W. Johnson; 
Benton Circuit, E. A. King; Harris- 
ville Circuit, I. H. S'ells; Millsaps Mem- 
orial, W. N. Ware; Rankin Street, F. 
L. Applewhite; Bentonia Circuit, Jesse 
■F. Watson; Monterey Circuit, L. M. 
Sharp; Student Millsaps College, R. 
T. Hollingsworth; Student Emory Uni- 
versity, Otto Porter, B. M. Hunt; Supt. 
Missions, Czecho-Slovakia, J. L. Neil; 
Union Circuit, S. F. Harkey; Indus- 
trial Sect. Y. M. C. A., J. S. Dukes; 
Oak Ridge, J. B. Cain; Port Gibson, 
N. B. Harmon; Rocky Springs, J. H. 
Sharp; Roxie, M. L. McCormick. 
Transferred: R. E. Simpson to North 
Arkansas Conference. 



MILLSAPS AT OXFORD 



In Which We Arrive And 
Get Settled 



(The following article was written 
by Frank K. Mitchell, Millsaps’ repre- 
sentative at Oxford University, Eng- 
land.) 

It is a peculiar fact that every writer 
who comes to Europe must inevitably 
bring out a book of some sort in which 
he purports to give an account of his 
impressions of the old country. Very 
frequently, the accounts are nothing 
more than a record of the health of 
the writer, and at best, they are, usual- 
ly, merely very personal impressions. 
And how could they be otherwise? 
Unless the guide-book system b» 
adopted — and it very often is. The 
Rhodes Scholar has a very similar 
characteristic which assumes the form 
of articles to his college paper. In 
truth, the Rhodes Scholar has two dis- 
tinctive characteristics: lack of funds 
and wealth of impressions. There are 
many kinds of Rhodes Scholars — I am 
quite certain of that — but the two 
characteristics mentioned above, to- 
gether with one or two minor ones, 
will serve ever to identify and classify 
him. Thus, these articles of mine to 
the Purple and White. I am fortunate 
to have as an excuse for mine that I 
am the first Millsaps man to come to 
Oxford, but, on the other hand, if it 
were not so, I am morally certain that 
these articles would have come any- 
how.* 

Rhodes Scholars in New York 

Our party, the class of 1921, met by 
arrangement at the Hotel McAlpin in 
New York on the first of October for 
several days entertainment and for 
getting acquainted before sailing. I 
went up several days ahead of the 
party for a short visit with Dr. Blanche 
Williams, a Mississippian, now lectur- 
ing in Columbia University. She was 
exceedingly kind to me in the way of 
entertainments, giving me several 
dinners and teas at which I met many 
of New York’s writers and literary 
critics. The entertainment for the 
whole party began with a tea dance on 
October the first in the Colonial Room 
of the Hotel. The same night, we all 
attended the theatre en masse, and 
next morning some of the kind citi- 
zens took us for a ride through the 
city. Monday afternoon. Professor 
Frank Adylotte received the party at 
the home of a friend on Lexington 
Avenue, and in the evening we at- 
tended the farewell banquet at the 
Harvard Club. 

Aboard the “Aquitanit” 

Early Tuesday morning, we were 
up scurrying about, getting packed, 
having our passports vized, and get- 
ting our money changed. Promptly 
at noon we sailed on the “Aquitania.’ 
There were in all over fifty of us, in- 
cluding the class of 1921, ten old men 
who had spent the summer in America 
and some several men who were com- 
ing to Oxford “on their own.” We 
were not well out of sight of the 
Statue of Liberty, before the line be- 
gan forming at the bar. It is a most 
peculiar fact that those who could 
hardly wait till the three mile limit 
was reached were Americans. I do 
(Continued on page 2) 



TUESDAY IIYAS PLEDGE 
DAY FOR FRATERNITIES 



Millsaps Frats Present Lists 
of Members 
to Be 



The fraternities and sororities of 
Millsaps College observed Tuesday of 
this week as pledge day. In the course 
of the afternoon, the pledge ceremon- 
ies were held at the various chapter 
houses and rooms. Lists of the 
pledges of the several organizations 
have been announced as follows. 

Kappa Sigma — William T. Cook, 
Floyd Cunningham, and Marion San- 
ders of Booneville, Miss.; James Jack 
Dillard of Roundaway, Miss.; Robert 
Lilly of Greenfield, Miss.; and G. Nel- 
son Lumpkin of Tupelo, Miss. 

Pi Kappa Alpha — George A. Brum- 
field of Tylertown, Miss.; Norman Gil- 
lis of Fayette, Miss.; DeWitt Mullen 
of Jackson; Robert Williams of Mc- 
Comb, Miss.; Wallace Lester of Jack- 
son; and O. L. Ellis of Ellisville, Miss. 

Kappa Alpha — J. C. Galloway, W. M. 
Galloway, and Eugene Tate of Mc- 
Comb, Miss.; W. H. Watkins, Jr. and 
S. S. McNair of Jackson; and William 
Fontaine of Clarksdale, Miss. 

Phi Mu — Lucie Watkins, Winnifred 
Hines, Bethany Swearingen, Ethel 
Msr'ey, Gwen Remfry, J. D. Smith, 
and Evelyn Flowers of Jackson; 
Gladys Curtis of Greenwood, Miss.; 
Catherine Tucker of Grenada. Miss., 
and Elise Davis of Laurel. 

Kappa Delta — Pauline Wills, Cyn- 
thia Thompson, Madeline Bland, May*- 
sie Simonton, Alee Pate, Alice Gille- 
yan. Marion Weeks, Jessie Craig, 
Alma Bufkin, and Bernice Harkey of 
Jackson. 

Alpha Theta Chi — Leroy Brooks, 
Tunica, Miss.;Theo. Granberry, Hat- 
tiesburg, Miss.; E. Paul Williams, 
Jackson, Miss.; I. C. Garber, Jackson, 

Miss. 



Lamar Literary Society 

Friday, December 16, 1921. 
Declaimer — J. D. Mullen 
Orator — W. M. Galloway 
Debate — Resolved, That all labor 
questions should be arbitrated. 

Affirmative — G. E. Clark and J. E. 
Tumlin. 

Negative — A. D. Cassity and O. B. 
Triplett. 



Galloway Literary Society 

Friday, December 16, 1921. 
Declaimer — M. M. McGowan 
Orator — J. W. Shanks ' 

Debate — Resolved, that all disputes 
between Labor and Capital should be 
settled by compulsory arbitration. 

Affirmative — J. E. Sandlin and A. N. 
Gore. 

Negative — E. L. Traylor and J. H. 
Hudson. 



Fast and thick the rice did fall like 
some angry snow storm, shoes and 
ribbons, no small number fluttered 
’round their heads when the big train 
brought them home. ’Tis a won' -, 
though, Mr. Bane did not pi-' h-r up 
and run. 





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MILLSAPS AT OXFORD 

(Continued from page 1) 
not blame them for it, for I take it to 
be nothing more than that same desire 
that leads them to want to kiss the 
Blarney stone, which, in truth, is a 
survival of that instinct that makes 
every boy to write on a freshly painted 
fence. After they had seen that there 
was no immediate danger of them 
losing this rare and coveted privilege, 
their ambition for liquor waned. 

As you may well imagine, with fifty 
American students on board, life did 
not run slow. Games of all sorts were 
improvised on deck, bridge and poker 
flourished in the smoking-room, and 
those more artistically inclined fur- 
nished music in the drawing-room. 
Several concerts were arranged during 
the voyage, in which several of our 
party took part. There were, also, 
movies every other night. On Satur- 
day, the Cunard Company gave the 
Rhodes Scholars a banquet. On Sun- 
day, religious services were conducted 
in several parts of the ship for both 
Romans and Protestants. Monday 
morning early, we sighted the coast of 
France, and at noon stopped in the 
Cherbourg harbour to land passengers 
and mail. At six the same evening, 
we docked at Southampton, having 
made a record trip for the “Aquitania.” 
We had little trouble getting 
through the customs, for tobacco and 
spirits seem to be about the only tax- 
able articles. I did get caught with a 
pound of tobacco, eight ounces being 
the limit, and had to pay ten shillings 
duty, a trifle more than the tobacco 
had cost me in New York. However, 
after I had tried English smoking to- 
bacco, I did not regret the cost. Some 
of the party went on up to London for 
several days before the opening of 
term, but most of us came directly to 
Oxford to get settled. 

Arrival at Oxford 
At this point, one usually raves in an 
exaggerated manner about the great 
emotion felt upon reaching Oxford. 
On the other hand, mine were of an- 
other sort. I became so impatient 
awaiting a porter to carry my luggage 
out of the carriage where I had identi- 
fied it (there is no such thing as a 
checking system here), that I thought 
of little else. Besides, a railway sta- 
tion is not a very agreeable place to 
experience a high emotion. But after 
T had got all my worldly goods safely 
stored in my Elizabethan garret in 
Oriel, and had had my lunch, 1 1 ’ felt 
more agreeable towards the architec- 
tural beauties of Oxford. I was agree- 
ably rewarded for my anticipation. 
My feelings are, perhaps better ex- 
pressed by an old lawyer who ap- 
proached me as I was standing on the 
High several days later. It was a 
fairly clear day, that is to say, ! t was 
not raining and there was no fog. 
From our position well cown, on our 
left, over many gabled roofs, we could 
see Merton tower and further ahead 
old “Tom,” the gateway to Christ 
Church; on our right, past the start- 
ling front of Queen’s and the fantastic 
All Souls’, we could see the beautiful 
and majestic spire of St. Mary the 
Virgin’s. The old lawyer broke in on 
me. “Friend,” he said, “there may be 
better architecture and more of it in 
the world, but if you can show me an- 
other such sight as this, lead me to it.” 
One is very likely brought back 
rather abruptly from contemplating 
beauties around him by the bustle of 
the narrow streets, which are thronged 
with numberless bicycles and which 
are lined with quaint little shops. It 
seems to me that whereas American 
shop windows incite awe and admira- 
tion, English ones incite a desire to 
buy. And in these same little shops 
we left a good portion of our pounds 



before we realized the true value of 
English money. 

Getting settled in college is quite 
an experience. In fact, if I ever set 
up house keeping really, I shall feel 
that I have been through the ordeal 
once already. One must buy china, 
silver, linen, etc., chiefly etc., (I am 
still buying it), for his rooms, for 
three of our meals each day are taken 
here. You can well imagine about 
how a tea in a student’s room in an 
American college, except Princeton, 
would get by. But here we soon fell 
into the habit as readily as though we 
had been born to the spout. And such 
a meal — one usually consumes four or 
five cups of tea, anchovy toast, hot 
buns, marmalade or jam, and cake. 
And in two hours we have dinner! 

Everything is bought through the 
college for consumption. One can buy 
all the liquors that he desires through 
his college, but woe to the unlucky 
undergraduate who is caught by the 
proctors in a public bar! And yet 
there is not a great deal of drunken- 
ness. When one does, by chance, see 
some English undergraduate reeling 
hilariously home, the actual fact in the 
case is that he has probably taken sev- 
eral glasses of port and thrown a de- 
lightful dry drunk. Nor is drinking at 
all universal among the English stud- 
ents. The one thing that is universal 
is eating. I have never seen people 
get away with as much food as do 
these students here. They would ruin 
a boardinghouse keeper in America. 

Matriculation 

Some days after our arrival, we were 
informed by a notice in the porter’s 
lodge that on a certain day we were 
to be matriculated in the University. 
The matriculation takes place in the 
Divinity School, which by the way 
isn’t'a divinity school at all, but a 
rather nice old place, with a very fan- 
tastic roof, where convocations are 
sometimes held (no, not on the roof). 
We all donned the white tie, dark suit, 
black shoes, gown and cap (this is one 
of the few occasions when one wears 
a cap, the others being at the time of 
examination, conferring of a degree, 
and when one is summoned before the 
proctors for having been caught at a 
dance or in a public bar). Our Dean 
lead the procession to the designated 
place, and after we had signed our 
names on the register, presented us 
to the Vice-Chancellor, who muttered 
a few words in Latin, gave us a book 
of statutes (in Latin) and tipped his 
cap to us. Hereafter we were duly 
] constituted members of Oxford Uni- 
I versity. 

The next thing in order was to see 
our moral tutor, who had been as- 
signed us by the Provost. The tutor 
advises with you about your intended 
study and degree and after these 
things are decided sends you to the 
tutor in your special field. Then you 
may settle down to study, however it 
is more likely that you will not, at 
least not the first term. But I shall 
say more of this in a subsequent arti- 
cle. 



Filbert: “Why is it that colored 

girls never wear bangs?” 

Hickory: “So you can’t pull the 

wool over their eyes.” — Orange Peel. 



Happiness — A Recipe 

To make it, take a hall, dim lit; 

A pair of stairs where two can sit; 

Of music soft, a bar or so; 

Two spoons of — just two spoons, you 
know; 

Of love pats, one or two. 

Or one squeezed hand instead of two, 
A waist — the size to be embraced; 
And two ripe lips, rose red — to taste; 
And if the lips are soft and sweet. 
You’ll find your happiness complete. 

— Lehigh Burr. 



<• 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



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PLEASE YOU 



THE ROMANCE OF A 
LOST LETTER 



It was the day before Christmas. 
The train stopped at the station and 
remained on the track for several min- 
utes, coughing violently and puffing 
huge volumes of smoke into the mist 
that suddenly began to fall gently on 
the throngs of passengers, who stag- 
gered to and from the train with arm- 
loads of Christmas-looking parcels. 

One of the last passengers to alight 
was a well-dressed, sombre young 
man, whom a wise judge would prob- 
ably accredit with thirty years. Philip 
Pierce swung his grip into the station 
with rather an impatient air, because 
he didn’t feel as if the world was treat- 
ing him very well on this cold rainy 
evening. It was his plan to remain in 
Jackson until the I. C. should make 
connection at the end of an hour, and 
take him on to the Crescent City. 
Pierce settled himself in a deserted 
comer, filled his pipe with his favorite 
tobacco, and fell to musing on tin 
horns, red ribbon, and Christmas 
trees. 

"Phaw,” he grumbled, “what’s the 
use of my strolling through an old 
town that I don’t know.” So he re- 
mained to count the rain drops on the 
window. When the hour was com- 
pleted, he approached the ticket agent. 

“Say, what’s happened to our train?” 
he inquired. 

“Wreck below Greenwood,” was the 
abrupt reply, which caused the dis- 
appointed traveler to sigh and to give 
up all hope toward spending Christmas 
at home. He silently concluded to 
saunter up to the Pantaze for a good 
hot supper and some gay music to 
cheer his soul. 

What could be worse than a rainy 
Christmas Eve? Poor, dejected Philip, 
armed with a suit case, was making 
his way through the crowds of late 
shoppers, when behold! the most at- 
tractively decorated window caught 
his eye. He examined with interest 
the articles it displayed and was about 
to decide on a purchase — but, wait! 
What was this letter under his left 
foot? Not a letter? No, a tom en- 
velope, yet on it the magic word 
“Thorne.” 

The young man observed it more 
closely under the light from the shop 
window — “Thorne, 912 Arlington Ave., 
Jackson, Miss.,” he read. 

Overcome with surprise and excite- 
ment, the young man couldn’t think 
very logically. But, yes, he wondered 
if that “really could be Janet, my lit- 
tle playmate who used to be a verita- 
ble ‘Thorne in the flesh’ for me when 
she pulled my hair in school, and 
every afternoon threw mud pies in my 
face, down there on the coast. She 
had moved ‘north’ with Grandma when 
her parents were drowned in the 
Gulf.” “And I haven’t seen her since,” 
he continued. “Wonder what she’s 
like” — and by that time he was so 
convinced that there was only one 
Thorne in the whole Capital City that 
he found himself boarding the street 
car in quest of adventure and — a girl! 

The houses were all lighted bril- 
liantly, and through the windows he 
could see children, wild with excite- 
ment in anticipation of Santa Claus’ 
approaching visit; mothers and fath- 
ers buried in holly and' ribbon and 
gifts. 

It was easy for him to find 912. He 
stepped uncertainly to the front door 
and pushed the button which proved 
to be his key to fairyland. The door 
swung open to reveal the most be- 
witching bit of blue and gold! He was 
amazed — enchanted! It could be none 
other than Janet herself, but he would 
make sure by a very proper introduc- 
tion. 



“Miss Thorne?” he inquired. 

“Yes,” she breathed; then as he 
entered the living-room and the light 
fell upon his handsome features, 
“Granny,” she exclaimed, “it’s Phil 
Pierce!” Granny Moore emerged from 
the fireside to join in the “home-com- 
ing” of her little (?) neighbor. 

Such a pleasure he had never felt; 
such an ovation he had never received. 
The young American traveler felt more 
like Caesar entering the gates of Rome 
at the head of a triumphal procession. 
The two women dragged him to the 
fire and insisted that he remain with 
them for Christmas. They asked a 
million questions to be answered in a 
second. 

“Do stay for supper,” begged Gran- 
ny. 

“We have only hot waffles, syrup, 
and coffee, interrupted Janet; but 
would he stay? It sounded like heaven 
to the lonely fellow, who made a 
mental resolution to see that Jackson 
become his fixed abode. 

Supper proved the occasion for 
“history” on both sides of the table. 
Janet had finished college and was 
secretary to some senator at the Capi- 
tol. She and Granny Moore were as 
happy as two chums could possibly 
be. They both adored Jackson, but 
often longed for their friends “down 
in Pass Christian.” 

Philip, too, had secured “the elusive 
dip” and boasted of being sales mana- 
ger for a large New Orleans Corpora- 
tion. He had been sent on business 
to Tennessee, and he was having "the 
dickens of a time” getting home for 
Christmas. 

“Where are your dear folks?” gently 
questioned Grandma, then a tear came 
into her eye as the young fellow told 
of their deaths and of his recent lone- 
liness. However, the Spirit of Christ- 
mas so filled her heart and that of the 
girl who laughed and sang as her 
dainty fingers wrapped up the gifts for 
the morrow that sadness vanished. 

Philip Pierce never spent a merrier 
Christmas. Young man never “fell so 
hard” for a blue-and gold girl. At the 
dawn of the next summer the train 
again stood on "the track and caughed 
— but this time sunshine flooded the 
train, and likewise the soul of a pros- 
perous young man who jumped from 
the train. On this day in June, he was 
armed with a solitaire, for (and here’s 
a mighty secret ! ) he was going to 
“ring the belle,” whose heart had been 
“Pierced” by Cupid’s arrow! 

Uncle and niece watching the young 
people dancing about them. 

“I bet you never saw any dancing 
like this back in the nineties, eh, 
Unkie?” 

“Once — but the place was raided.” 
— The Siren. 



Alas, Poor Elizabeth. 

She lay before him — dead. And the 
rain fpll from the leaden sky upon her 
rain fell from the leaden sky upon her 
head bowed, and his heart filled with 
a comsuming anguish. Slowly he 
stooped and touched her with his 
finger tips. No more did he hear her 
gentle murmurings. He had killed 
her — her who had toiled for him, and 
had helped him through so many hard j 
passages, had he killed. The muddy 
deserted road lay before and behind 
him, and the rain fell upon them. 

Then, with a sigh, he slammed 
down the hood and began to crank 
the engine, hoping he could start her. 

— Phoenix. 

Famous Sayings. 

Lem me 

Why not? 

Cantcha take a joke? 

Goodnight! 

— Orange and Blue. 



Registration figures at Auburn 
Polytechnic Institute show an en- 
rollment of approximately twelve 
hundred students, which is the larg- 
est in several years. 

— Florida Alligator. 



At Iowa State University they have 
a drum seven feet in diameter and 
fifty inches in width to use at foot- 
ball games. The drum causes so 
much noise that at times cheering 
is drowned out. The instrument is 
mounted on a special carriage with 
two wheels and the entire instrument 
and carriage stand nine feet from the 
ground. -Washburn Review. 



The feasibility of an inter-collegiate 
wireless service for the purpose of 
exchanging news is being considered 
by members of the Journalism Fac- | 
ulty at K. U. In this manner col- 
j leges and universities within a rea- 
I sonable distance of each other could , 
i exchange news every day. — Missis- 

sippian. 



He — You know' Kipling called wo- 
man “a rag, a bone, and a hank of 
hair.” 

She — Yes, but there seem to be 
plenty of rag pickers. 

— Ohio Wesleyan Mirror. 



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4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHI.T.E 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 

Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of eacn 
Monday. 



._Fred Lotterhos 

Walter Stokes 

-E. K. Windham 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief 

Athletic Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor M. M. McGowan 

REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer, J. D. MuUen, Miss Mildred Brashear, A. L. Joyner, D. F. McNeil, H. 
L. Villee. 



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_Miss Daley Crawford 
J. W. Sells 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager- 
Circulation Manager 



_H. B. Collins 
— Geo. Watts 



_G. K. Hebert 



THE RECENT EXAMINATIONS. 



The rumors are current that on the examinations of last week 
there was more dishonesty than ever before. If these reports are 
true, we hang our heads in shame. It is hard to understand how 
students in a college known for its high ideals and for its clean 
spirit can stoop so low as to sign their names to a lie. 

No honorable man or woman will cheat on an examination. 
No person with any self-respect at all can cheat and then sign 
his name and his father’s name to the statement that he has not 
cheated. 

The failure of “somebody” to educate the new men into a 
knowledge of what a college honor system means may account in 
part for the epidemic. But that failure is not an excuse for the 
students that forgot their honor. 

It is the duty of the students who do care for the upholding 
of elevated standards to make it known that they will not stand 
for any lack of honor on this campus. It is their duty to let it be 
understood that at the next examination period they will use every 
effort to see that the Honor Council receives evidence sufficient to 
rid Millsaps of every person that cannot stand an honest test. 



S. I. A. A. RULES. 



The new S. I. A. A. rules forbidding freshmen to play on the 
teams will place a great burden on Millsaps and other small col- 
leges. It is too late to protest now, for the action is already taken, 
but we cannot help thinking about how our teams will be hurt. 

As Dr. Key says, the rule may be changed next year, after some 
of the small colleges that voted for the new order begin to feel 
the effects. Let us hope that Dr. Key’s prophecy is true. In the 
meantime, there is but one thing for us to do. That thin-j is to 
forget our troubles temporarily and turn our best energies „o mak- 
ing strong teams in basketball and baseball this year. For, luckily, 
the new regulation does not affect us until next session. 



Once more we remind our readers of the short story contest 
and of the Clark Essay contest. Both of these are open to all stu- 
dents of the college. 



Our representatives in the recent road race held at Emory 
University bring back the report that that school is working harder 
than ever to get intercollegiate athletics. If there were any way 
in which we could help the Emory students to gain their goal, we 
should be ready to offer our assistance. The school has all to gain 
and nothing to lose by an entrance into the athletic fields of the 
South. jy 9 f 



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suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 



' Men's wL 



i:WFAff 



‘After Every MeaT 




P 







FIVE CENTS 

The Flavor Lasts! 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 



CONCERNING CO-EDS 

It is a common saying that the girls 
of today will be the women of tomor- 
row; also that added duties bring 
added responsibilities. Here at Mill- 
saps seme of us are inclined to think 
that the college is for the boys and 
that we are in the role of onlookers 
rather than participants in the student 
activities. What should come about 
ic that the distinctive atmosphere of 
Millsaps should develop a type of edu- 
cated. Christian womanhood that 
would be peculiar to her alone. 

Already we have scored a triumph 
this year in scholarship, but can't we 
do even better? Surely you will agree 
that two-thirds of us are capable of 
reaching that degree of excellency re- 
quired. Then why don't we do it? 
Pride should compel us to do so if 
ambition is lacking. 

A real, live girl should be interested 
: n every phase of college work. We 
all go to the football games and yell, 

* rying our best to help the team win. 
But it is more to our credit to have a 
good Y. W. C. A. in school than to 
“xcel in athletics, because a good team 
requires no effort on a girl’s part, while 
a good Y. W. C. A. means work for 
everybody. 

With the acquisition of our “Rights” 
must realise that we have an un- 
limited influence in shaping public 
opinion and in making our country 
better. We can do this only by making 
ourselves better. The women of Mis- 
sissippi in one of their organizations 
have already begun to study school 
conditions and other phases of citizen- 
ship. In doing this some of us will 
have to be in the public eye and should 
learn how to speak and act properly 
there. The literary societies could be 
very helpful factors if we could over- 
come the “conscientious” objections of 
the masculine members. We can rival 
them successfully in classes, girls, and 
, must strive for an opportunity to 
measure up with them in this other 
way. There is nothing better to de- 
velop quick, intensive thinking than 
debating. Let us think about this 
matter seriously and take the in- 
itiative in demanding admittance to 
this important phase of school life. 

— Co-Ed. 

TEN GOOD REASONS 

■ < 

Why every respectable thinking man 
and woman should swear just as often 
and as hard as they can: 

1. Because it is such an elegant way 
of expressing one’s thoughts. 

2. Because it is such a conclusive 
proof of taste and good breeding. 

3. Because it is such a good way of 
making one’s self agreeable to his 
friends. 

4. Because it is positive evidence 
of acquaintance with good literature. 

5. Because it furnishes such a good 
example and training for boys and 
girls. 

6. Because it is Just what one’s mo- 
ther enjoys having her child do. 

7. Because it would look so nice in 
print 

8. Because it is such a good way of 

increasing one’s self respect. •: 

9. Because it is such help to virtue. ^ 
manhood and womanhood in many | 
ways. 

10. Because it is such an infallible | 

way of improving one’s chance in the | 
hereafter. | 

BUT GOD SAYS: “Thou shalt no* | 
take the name of the Lord thy God in | 
vain; for the Lord will not hold him 9 
guiltless that taketh his name in vain.” | 
— Exod. 20:7. = . 



9 



SMART CLOTHES 



FOR 



YOUNG MEN 



MADE BY HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 



They’re finely tailored by hand in the 
finest all-wool fabrics — exclusive pat- 
terns and NEW Styles. Satisfaction 
or money back. A hearty welcome 
awaits you at — 



“Jackson’s Best Store” 

KENNINGTON’S 

WALK-OVER AND HANAN SHOES 



H* T. Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

| Property of Athletic Association 

Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious Influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.8. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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1 FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE 

g Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 



i South State Street 



JACKSON, MISS. 



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♦iiumiiiiiiuimiiiiiiutimiiiiMiiiDiimmmC- 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




COACH FREELAND EMORY WINS METH- 
ISSUES CALL FOR ODIST ROAD RACE 

BASKET BALL 



(Continued from page 1) 



Basketball practice got under way j Millsaps team, composed of John Ram- 



this week when early in the week 
Coach Preeland issued a call to the 
basketball men to report for practice. 
The basketball prospects this year are 
bright. There is a possibility of our 
getting a new gymnasium. The plans 
are going forward rapidly and the re- 
sult of the effort should be known next 
week. This fact alone will strengthen 
the basketball season financially. The 
old men who returned are: Coursey 
(Captain and forward) ; McEwen (for- 
ward) ; McCormick (forward) ; Reeves 
(guard). The second string men who 
returned are Poole, B. P. Coursey, 
Campbell, Hillman, and Ramsey. Hon- 
eycutt, Applewhite, and Villee of the 
1920 team are going to be in shape 
so that they can come out for the 
team this year. 

The only dark spot in the whole 
thing is that McEwen will not be able 
to get into the game this year, hav- 
ing had his leg broken in football. 
McEwen was the shining light on the 
team last year. He is a big husky. 



H. B. Collins, put forth its best efforts, 
sey, M. C. Overall, M. L. Burke, and 
and considering the amount of train- 
ing done, the score is not a bad one. 
The team, as individuals, finished as 
follows: Collins 6th, Overall 18th, 

Ramsey 19th, Burke 21st. Emory had 
seven men besides the regular team 
to run the race, making the total num- 
ber of entries thirty one. A gold 
medal was given to the first man to 
finish, a silver medal to the second, 
and bronze medals to the next eight. 
Dr. Asa G. Candler, President of the 
Board of Trustees of Emory Universi- 
ty, made the speech presenting the 
silver loving cup to the Emory team. 
This is the cup that was won by them 
last year, and it will remain in their 
possession permanently if they win 
the road race again next year. 

Track is the only form of intercol- 
legiate athletics that Emory is able to 
participate in, and consequently much 
interest is shown in it. The students 
and friends of Emory are now work- 



lirtstntas Clifts 

OF DISTINCTION 

BURR, PATTERSON & CO. 



MANUFACTURING FRATERNITY JEWELERS 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



Mr. W. H. Beck, Jr. 

Will be at the Edwards Hotel November 
25-26, with samples of the NEWEST 
creations in JEWELRY and NOVELTIES 



SEND FOR “A GIFT BOOK FOR MODERN GREEKS" 



fast, a good passer, cool headed, and I hard for intercollegiate athletics 

of all kinds and it is our hope that 
they will not be disappointed. Every 
courtesy and kindness that was pos- 
sible was shown the visiting team. 
Everyone went away impressed not 
only with the athletic ability of the 
“Hillbillies” but with their splendid 
spirit of sportsmanship. We join with 
the other Southern Methodist Colleges 
in endorsing their campaign for inter- 
collegiate athletics and trust that the 
time will not be far off when the 
trustees will see the wisdom of such 
a step. 



a good shot. His presence on the 
team will be greatly missed. 

Capt. Coursey played a great game 
last year. He is in the game every 
minute and fighting hard all the time. 
McCormick played great ball at the 
beginning of the season last year, but 
sustained an injury toward the last 
of the season that kept him from fin- 
ishing the season. Reeves was easily 
the best guard that played on the Mill 
saps court last year. When his man 
makes a goal “he has done some- 
thing”. Breezy is not much shot but 
he is some “sticker”. 

The hardest place to fill this year 
will be center. “Pardner" Peevey 
played this position last year so well 
that it was very seldom that the op- 
posing center got his hands on the 
ball. Peevey’s great playing wiil be 
missed this year. It will be hard to 
get a man to take his place. Although 
if Hillman comes out and stays out 
we will have a man that can stay with 
the best of them. Poole, Coursey, 
Campbell, Ramsey, Honeycutt, Apple- 
white, and Villee are going to make 
a fight for positions on the team. 

Pardner Ben says that “Honey” is 
going to make a good man this year. 
We hope that he will 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1922 



R. H. GREEN 

Wholesale Grocer 

Feed Manufacturer ( old Storage 

Jackson, Miss. 



* 



KODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICII & CO. 

Comics, Cartons, Commercial News 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 
Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 

Birmingham-Southern, at Birmingham. 225 Freshmen, with a total enrollment SPALDING FOR SPORT 



A lecturer had been describing some 
of the sights he had seen abroad. 

“There are many spectacles in the 
world that one never forgets,” he 
said. 

“I wish you would tell me where i 
I can get a pair,” exclaimed an old 

lady in the audience. “I am always 
forgetting mine.” 

— North China Standard. 



Centenary College, at Jackson, Octo- 
ber 13th. 



Yale has an enrollment of near 
3,550, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology about 3,400, and Harvard 
about 6,000. Brown University has 
427 in the Freshman class, Vassar has 



October 28th. 

Howard College, at Birmingham, No- 
vember 4th. 

Miessissippi College, at Jackson, No- 
vember 11th. 

University of Mississippi, at Jackson, 
November 30th. 

Union University, at Jackson, Tenn., 
(date undecided). 

Mississippi Normal, at Hattiesburg, 
(date undecided), 
come out for U. T. Doctors, at Memphis, (date un- 
decided.) 



Willie Willis — Pa, what do they 
mean when they say a woman is 
dressed in the “height of fashion?” 
Papa Willis — About an inch above 
Town Topics. 



center. Applewhite used to be a good 
forward, and if he is able to come out 
every afternoon he will be in the 
scrap for that position. Poole and 
Ben Frank Coursey have taken on a 
great deal of weight this summer and 
are going to put up a great fight this 

year. Among the new men. Brooks ,lle knees ’ m y son 

seems to be the outstanding light. He 

comes with a good reputation and Yale has established the first school 
we hope that he lives up to it. Lewis °t citizenship ever established by an 
is reported to be a good center. There American University. — Exchange. 

are others who are going to be out 1 

for the team. A man without a purpose is like a 

The prospects are bright for us to vessel without a pilot. He drifts and 
give Miss. College the same trimming never arrives at the desired destina- 
that we gave them last year. We tion. Every college man ought to 
hope to take Ole Miss under cover have a purpose in view, and as a col- 



of 1,145. Middlebury opens with a 
record attendance of 457, the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania enrollment ex- 
ceeds 12,000 and Temple University 
8,000. Over 15,000 have already reg- 
istered at New York University. 

— The Florida Alligator.! 




again also. 



lege man that purpose ought to be to 
get the most there is to be had from 
a college career. — The Technique. 



Suspicious Wife: “I smell cloves.” 
Hubby: “No’m dear. Taint cloze. 
Sh flowrsh on m’neckties.” 

— Sun Dodger. 



Mr. Bane was excited — Yes, surely. 
He registered at the hotel: “Mr. and 
Mrs J. R. Bane and wife.” 



When Purchasing Athletic Equipment 
Insist Upon 

“SPALDING’S” 

SATISFACTION IS INEVITABLE 
Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

130 Carondelet St. — New Orleans 



The Kampus Kick. 

“Oh, isn’t she just adorable; oh, 
he is perfectly darling; why, it’s just 
precious! Aren’t they georgeous, oh 
simply marvelous!” — and so on rave 
the gushers about everything under 
the sun. Girls, isn’t it really sicken- 
ing to hear these same worn-out, stale, 
and usually inappropriate phrases re- 
peated hundreds of times a day and 
applied to anything from a visiting 
lecturer or a fruit salad for lunch 
to a piece of sentimental music or a 
full moon. The gushers seem to have 
developed tones of voice like melted 
honey or sticky molasses. There is 
nothing sincere, vigorous, or forceful 
in their speech. This week devoted 
to the improvement of the American 
language is an especially good time 
to try to guard against such extrava- 
gant expressions. All of us, it seems, J 

are inclined to exaggerate, but we i The War Memorial Drive for one 
should be very careful to speak simply million dollars has been oversub- 
and accurately, and we shall find scribed by fifty thousand dollars and 
after all that It Is much more expres- more is expected to be raised, 
sive. — Ward-Belmont Hyphen. - — Red and Black. 



Mistakes. 

When a plumber makes a mistake 
he charges twice for it. 

When a lawyer makes a mistake he 
has a chance to try the mistake all 
over again. 

When a carpenter makes a mistake 
it is just as he expected. 

When a doctor makes a mistake he 
buries it. 

When a judge makes a mistak ? it 
becomes a law. 

When a preacher makes a mistake 
nobody knows the difference. 

But when the editor makes a mis- 
take — GOOD NIGHT! -Exchange. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




LIFE 



A kiss, a sigh, 

A fond good-bye. 

And she is gone — 

A smile, a curl. 

Another girl 

And thus the world moves on. 



TAIN’T NOTHIN’ RONG 



Tain’t nothin’ rong, 

I jes wants yoo — 

Can’t seem to res 

An feels so blew — Can’t nothin’ seem 
to satisfl. 

Hole darn worl’ seems jes 1 si; 

Feel sorter lonli hole dai. thew, 

But tain’t nothin’ rong — 

I jes wants yoo — 



SAYINGS OF SOME OF US 

Flowers — Say it with flowers. 

King — The King can do no wrong. 

Campbell — Thats the straw that 
broke the camel’s back. 

Moore — There Is always room for 
one more. 

Patch — A patch in time saves mine. 

Cross — Do not cross the bridge be- 
fore you come to it. 

Hart — Have a heart. 

Waits — Everything comes to him 
who waits. 



An artist has arrived to make some 
lines on the tennis court, but we think 
that it would have been better if he 
had brought some dynamite to blow 
some more holes in the golf course. 

Ducky says — “A man who is not al- 
ways trying to make himself pleasing 
is seldom displeasing.” 



Trip was searched and found want- 
ing. (?) 



Just when we have to go to town 
to study, because the lights are out, 
we get on one of the modern street 
cars and see the sign “This is the 
Age of Service.” 



We take pleasure In announcing 
that “Half Pint” Conrsey is the lead- 
ing candidate for Sponsor of the Girls 
Tennis Team. 



Prof. Bowen — "Why do you think 
you deserve a ten on that question?” 
Granberrv — “You said tell all I knew 
about It and I did.” 



The Photographer asks us to an- 
nounce that all remove glasses wh ! l- 
having pictures taken so as to avoid 
blurring, also some of the Profs, may 
keep there hats on. 



The faculty is as tight with the holi- 
days as a Pullman window. 



Joe Abney says — “When girls are 
not talking they are eating, therefore, 
feed them more.” 



“What would you do if your cir' told 
you she had to stop at a store and get 
a hair net.” 

“I would take the hint”. 



If a e-irl told you that she liked a 
jelly would you get Cross? 



Freshman Nel'O” th’nks B. V. D.’s 
is a branch of the Elks. 



Fresh— “Can a Foot-bal'?" 

Fright Soph— “No. but Pigs-kin” 



“Well, that’s all over”, cried the 
Co-ed as she powdered her face. 



The cows are in the meadow 
The crickets in the grass 
But all the cute Co-eds 
Are in the Freshman Class. 



“You are hiding something from me” 
cried the Villian, as she combed the 
hair down over her ears. 



Watts, boarding street car, — “Good 
morning, Shorty, how are you?” 
Shorty in a bad humor — “Fare." 



The Freshman doze 
The Sophomore blows 
The Junior grows 
But the Senior knows. 



“Isn’t this ripping?” said the drop- 
stich as it ran down the stocking. 



Puppy Love is the beginning of a 
dog’s life. — Sandspur. 



Prof. White — “What do you think of 
Scott’s ‘Ivanhoe’?” 

Crisler— “I like his Emulsion better.” 



“I hear some of the Profs, lead a 
fast life.” 

“I doubt it, not one of them passed 
me this term.” 



Coach Freeland — “Galloway, what 
is your idea of clean sport?” 
Galloway — “Swimming.” 



You frequently meet a man who 
admits he is broke, but nearly every 
girl has a roll in her stocking. 



Fresh — “John Ramsey is so unfor- 
tunate.” 

Soph — "How’s that” 

Fresh — “Why only last week he 
broke one of the best track records 
here at Millsaps.” 



Freshman Chunn wants to know if 
Moses came over in the ark. 



Squelched. 

He: “My heart is on fire with love 
for you. My very soul is aflame!” 
She: “Never mind, father will put 
you out.” — Widow. 



"It’s all off for the night,” she cried 
as she wiped her face with a towel. 

— Spectator. 



Waiter: On which side of the table 

do you wish to sit, ma’am? 

Innocent Young Thing: Oh. dear, I 

think I had rather use a chair. — Ex. 



Helen Happ, in virtue reared, 

Sat on her sweetheart’s lap. 

But suddenly her pa appeared 
And caused a sad Miss Happ. 

— Reflector. 



“You say that is a birth mark, and 
yet you admit that you got it on the 
train?” 

“Yes, you see I tried to get in the 
wrong birth.” — Tar Baby. 



Judge: Have you seen the prison- 
er at the bar? 

Witness: No, but I’ve seen him 

when I thought he’d been there. — Ex. 



Wo W ton — Once there was a very beau- 
ious woman. 

"in’- — Hush, crazy, you make me 
V’n«ry 

Pane, going over an example in 
c, ''*'h. Algebra: I don’t see the mis 

take. Does any of the class? 

Hazle: Mr. Bane, you have up there 
2x4=6. 



Just A Little Co-ed 



Yes, I’m just a little Co-ed, with all 
that the name implies. I may have 
bobbed hair or long tresses, but what- 
ever my looks may be I have feelings. 
And lately I have not had to wear them 
on my sleeve in order to know that 
I possess them. The reason for this? 
It is simply because I have been ab- 
solutely left out. I seem to be no 
longer included in the routine of col- 
lege life. In no way am I acknowledg- 
ed as even belonging to the school. As 
proof for this, I will cite you to the 
football games my college has played 
lately, for this is the best example. 

To begin with I was in favor of 
everything that boosted Athletics. It 
was my pride to say “Millsaps is go- 
ing to be great this year,” — and 
stand by my declaration every time 
I had a chance. When season tickets 
were sold, I helped to make the Co-eds 
vote unanimous by pledging to buy 
one. Lately I have made another 
pledge to the new gymnasium. 

Then, after I’ve done my part 
toward this, I go to a football game. 
My team is playing against “Goat” 
Hale. Enthusiasm is at its height. 
Everyone is holding his breath. And 
when we can contain ourselves no 
longer we yell and shout. I clap my 
hands, stamp my feet, and give every 
ounce of my vocal strength to our 
cheers and songs. At this crucial 
moment Belhaven cheers our team. 
We respond by cheering Belhaven. 
Then some more yells for our boy3. 
I wait. I begin to wonder. Why, 
never before have we played this long 
without our boys at least acknowledg- 
ing our presence. I forget myself 
now when we are again boosting our 
team. The game is nearly over when 
I hear, “Rah — Rah — Rah, Rah, Rah, 
— Rah — Rah — Rah — Rah, Rah, Rah 
— Haven! Haven! Bel — Haven!!” The 
game is % over, we leave. I try not to 
think about myself for I try to believe 
that the game was too exciting for 
the boys to think of us. 

But— when I went to the last game 
of the season, and the same thing hap- 
pened— I was convinced. Not only 
did they neglect to cheer us, but they 
sat away from us. It seemed that the 
more isolated they made us the better 
it suited them. It has always been 
told me that the boy, the man, should 
I make the advances. Maybe it has 
I gotten to the place where our boys 
think we ought to be on our own re- 
sources and not depend on them. 
Well, if that’s the case I think every- 
thing will be all right — for — we’re just 
little Co-eds. but we’re ’round here. 



GIRLS TO DISCOURAGE WOMAN 
SMOKING HABIT 



Delegates to the Woman’s Intercol- 
legiate conference in session at the 
University of California discussed the 
attitude toward college women smok- 
ing. It was agreed that public opin- 
ion should he moulded in each univer- 
sity to cope with the situation before 
it becomes serious. 

Forty-two representatives from col- 
leges west of the Mississippi are at- 
tending the conference. 

It was shown that scholarship 
standings are higher at schools where 
prizes are awarded to fraternities and 
sororities for high grades. 

— Hullabaloo. 



Ride, and the girls ride with you, 
Walk and you walk alone; 

For the Cappers these days are set 
in th°ir ways — 

They like a guy with a car of his 
own. — Ex. 



MY LAST GOBBLE 



About this time every year my tur- 
key heart begins to grieve. There are ^ 
two reasons which cause this terrible 
ache to creep into my being. First, I 
weep for my own dear sake, for, if I 
didn’t, who would? And then I think 
about the cruel, cruel people — those 
who seem so friendly during my in- 
fancy, who feed me and tend me with 
the greatest care — then are the cause 
of my untimely death. From the 
month of January until the first of 
November I lead my own sweet life, 
taking fun as I find it and feeding 
upon the best crumbs of the table. 

But alas! I need not think twice to 
know what it means when I see my 
master drive out of the barn with a 
big coop attached to his wagon. Too 
many times, during my childhood have 
I seen that very same wagon drive 
away with my cousins and uncles, and 
they never return with the wagon. Too 
many times have I listened to the far 
away gobbles of my friends as they 
speed on their way toward town. How 
well can I remember last year when 
my eldest brother, who was a hand- 
some bird, took his last manly peep 
from the coop and yelled to me, “Gob- 
ble! Gobble!” which, in Turkey lan- 
guage, is “It’s coming! It’s coming!” 
meaning the end, of course. 

Even though I have been taught 
from earliest childhood to regard death 
as my birthright, I can’t make a Spar- 
tan of myself. So, when I was awak- 
ened early one morning two weeks 
ago, by my master. I knew that it 
was time to bring all my courage Into 
play. It was hard, but I managed to 
leave my old homestead without utter- 
ing more than two gobbles. We trav- 
eled along the road for a long time, 
-finally reaching a street where a funny 
looking thing, with two big eyes in 
front, came running toward me. Just 
as it got opposite me it yelled, “Honk!” 

I gobbled back, but it didn’t seem to 
understand me like my mule friend * 
at home. 

My master then stopped suddenly, 
and jer'-ing me out of the coop, car- 
ried me around a house and deposited 
me in a very dilapidated looking struc- 
ture. I didn’t even have room to stand 
up straight, so when I threw back my 
head to gobble, the roof hit me in the 
I eye. Just about this time a little child 
came running out and said, "Mother! 
just ten more days before we eat it.” 

So that was what became of all my 
ancestors. I’m losing my courage 
swiftly now. Each morning my legs 
j are more unsteady under me. And to 
think, when these last words of mine 
are read, I will be no more. “Oh, Gob- 
ble! Gob-ble! !” 



MANY AMERICAN MEN IN 
FRENCH COLLEGES 



With the increased interest in France 
brought about by the return of the 
American Soldiers from France, Amer- 
ica has shown more interest in French 
institutions. American students ar6 
attending French universities where, 
after they have an A. B. from some 
college in the United States, they may 
study for their Doctor’s degree, or take 
elementary courses in the French Un- 
iversities. A French restoration Fund 
has been raised for the purpose of 
raising money to rebuild the schools 
of France. 

Already the school children have 
viven two million francs to the build- 
ing of eleven schools and now the 
University students are being given 
the privilege of contributing to the 
called the “Universitie du Travail” 
-t Lille. — Hullabaloo. 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Mississippi’s Largest and Most Comfortable 
Theatre 



The MAJESTIC 



PROPER PRESENTATION OF THE 
PHOTO-DRAMATIC ART 



Friday-Saturday, Dec. 16-17 Monday-Tuesday, December 19-20 Wednesday-Thursday, Dec. 21-22 

Mary Pickford in Elsie Ferguson in All-Star Cast in 

‘THROUGH the BACK DOOR” “FOOTLIGHTS” “DANGEROUS LIES” 

THE BEST COMEDIES AND EDUCATIONAL REELS ON THE MAR KET ARE SHOWN IN THIS THEATRE. 



LOCALS 



The Cozy Theatre 

Friday and Saturday, Dec. 16-17 

WALLACE REID 

— in — 

“The Hell Diggers” 



Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 19-20 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 

— in — 

“The Mark of Zorro” 



Wednesday-Thursday, Dec. 21-22 

PEARL WHITE 

— in — 

“Know Your Men” 



ORCHESTRA 

SHOWS 2 TO 11 P. M. DAILY 
Except Sunday ' 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson. Miss. 

SR McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



j B. M. Hunt visited the campus this 
f week. 



The faculty met in regular session 
on Tuesday afternoon. 

James Witt of Jackson has matricu- j 
lated since examinations. 

“Rare Ben” Johnson has withdrawn 
from school to take up his duties as , 
a preacher. 

Fred McEwen has gone to his home j 
in Johnston Station to remain until 
after the holidays. 



B. F. Coursey, J. T. Coursey, I. C. j 
Garber, and W. E. Corley enjoyed a | 
trip to Hattiesburg last week. 



! The students circulated a petition 
| early in the week in an attempt to | 
have the holidays begin on Saturday *‘ 4Z 
j the seventeenth. j *= 

■+ 

__ Dr. Key went to Birmingham last 
week to attend the meeting of the 
j Southern Intercollegiate Athletic As- 
I sociation. 

Ross Moore went on a visit to New- 
ton last week-end to see J. W. Moore, 

_ who had to withdraw from school re- 
cently on account of eye trouble. 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



DRM/C 



Ihero'Colf 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J.JLJUJ B E R 
Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Bldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 




Prof. Bowen was absent from his 
classes Wednesday and Thursday, 
much to the sorrow of Freshman Bi- 
ble. He attended a conference in 
Memphis. 

The Bohashela management ha- 
been busy last week taking the final 
group pictures. On Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday mornings the photographer was 
on location, and took advantage of 
the fair weather to get in some good 
work. 

‘ 

— 

The first open lecture of the year 
was delivered on Thursday night at 
the Chapel. Prof. M. C. White spoke 
on “Hamlet, His Task and His Prob- 
lems”, a subject that is close to his 
heart and upon which he delivered an 
interesting and instructive talk. 

M. M. Black, recently appointed to 
the position of Treasurer of Millsaps 
College, has an office in the Admin- 
istration Building, where he receives 
payments from students every day be 
tween the hours of eight-thirty and 
1 ten-thirty. Mr. Black has been con- 
nected with the college as Commis- 
sioner for a number of years. 

Mrs. Thompson, the popular matron 
of Galloway and Burton Halls, served 1 
1 a meal to one of the Jackson clubs 
recently, at the college dining hall 
She was able to realize fifty dollars 
from the dinner, which will be used 
in purchasing furniture for the lobby 
of Galloway Hall. The members of 
the Methodist Conference meeting in 
Jackson last week were also fed at the 
college on one occasion. 

First Mademoiselle — Does she paint 
her eyebrows? 

Second — No; that is where she 
draws the line. — Florida Alligator. 



“EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE 

Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A 100^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 



CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

United States, Hinds County and City Depository 

Capital paid in $200,000.00 

Stockholders’ liabilities - — 200,000.00 

Surplus earned 225,000.00 

Undivided profits, net 25,000.00 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



“BARKER BREAD ” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 
THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



A N NO U N C I N G 

Advance Styles in Cards for the 

Christ mas -Tide 

Order Note 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Frank T. Scott 



Charlie Scott 



CITY SHOE SHOP 



SCOTT & SCOTT Free shine to Mill saps Students for 

every job of shoe repairing. 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law ^06 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 

Capital National Bank Bldg. Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

jackson, miss. M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 



Phone 2701 





QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, JAN. 6, 1922 No. 12 



GALLOWAYS CLOSE 
PROGRAM FOR 1921 



“M'S" AWARDED TO 
1/ EOOTBALL MEN 



M.C. WHITE PRESENTS 
SHAKESPEARIAN LECTURE! 



LAMAR OffICERS EOB 
•LAST TWO 



Decide Bachelors Should 
Not Pay Tax For 
Old Maids 



With the eagle screaming and the 
flags waving, the Galloway Literary 
Society began its last session of 1921. 
Rev. J. W. Shanks rose to deliver the 
oration of the evening, and from his 
lips flowed the linguistic milk and 
honey. Mr. S’hanks’ theme was “De- 
mocracy.” Beginning with ancient 
Greece, he traced the evolution of de- 
mocracy to its present stage of devel- 
opment. When he closed with an ad- 
monition to his audience, almost before 
their eyes they beheld that glorious 
American Eagle, the champion of 
world brotherhood. 

The question to be discussed in the 
triangular debate, “Resolved, That all 
disputes between capital and labor 
Id be settled by compulsory arbi- 
tration,” was the question for the de- 
bate. G. H. Jones and J. Sandlin ad- 
vocated the affirmative, while J. F. 
Hudson and E. W. Brown upheld the 
negative. The importance of the ques- 
tion forbids its discussion in print. 
The irregular debate was dispensed 
with. 

The society decided to discuss in the 
impromptu debate, whether or not old 
bachelors should be taxed for the sup- 
port of old maids. W. N. Ware, 
though a married man, and D. W. 
Poole were the advocates of the tax. 

'•’'irking of responsibility and -the 
helpless and joyless estate of the old 
maid formed the barrage fire of the af- 
firmative. M. I. Hunnicutt and J. S. 
Warren rose nobly to the defense of 
the bachelors. It was plain that the 
maids owed their plight to their negli- 
gence or to sourness. 

The society being composed largely 
of bachelors or bachelors-to-be, it is 
needless to say that it registered it- 
self as opposed to such a measure. 

The outgoing president administered 
the oath to the incoming officers for 
the present term, headed by President 
'. W. Bailey. Owing to the departure 
of “Rare Old Ben” Johnson, the so- 
ciety elected a "Freshman debater to 
take bis place, J. H. Sharp. The so- 
ciety authorized the treasurer to make 
a refund to the “Purple and White.” 
It then adjourned to meet after the 
Christmas holidays. 



BASKETBALL DELAYED 
BEGADSE OF GYM WORK 

The basketball season for Millsaps 
will be somewhat delayed this session 
on account of the work on the gymna- 
sium. The planned improvements will 
require at least two weeks for com- 
pletion, and consequently our team has \ 
no suitable place to practice, much less 
to play games. No games will be play- 
ed before February. As soon as the 
gym can be prepared, the squad will 
get to work in earnest to make up for 
the time lost. 



Jackson High and Academy 
Teams are Guests at 
Annual Meeting 

The 1921 football season of Millsaps 
College came to an official close on 
Tuesday night of December 20, 1921. 
The occasion was the annual football 
banquet and awarding of “M’s.” At 
six o’clock on the night in question, 
the student body of the college, the 
football Majors, representatives of the 
alumni, the Academy team, and the 
Jackson High School football men en- 
tered the spacious dining hall of Gallo- 
way Hall. The room was handsomely 
decorated, and the tables were ar- 
ranged in three long rows. As soon 
as the guests were seated, a first-class 
supper was served, with all the little 
dots and dashes that make a ban- 
quet something different from ord - 
nary meals. Soon the banquet was 
over, the tables were cleared, and 
what might be called the business ses- 
sion began. 

J. W. Broom Presides 
Mr. J. W. Broom, of the State Depart 
ment of Education, was toast master. 
He took little time for introduction, but 
quickly presented the various speak- 
ers of the occasion. Dr. A. F. Wat- 
kins, president of the college, was the 
first to take the floor. His remarks 
were by way of welcome to the v’s- 
itors, especially to the Jackson High 
and Academy teams. Our president’s 
I talk was full of enthusiasm for what 
Millsaps is to accomplish. He said, 
“I believe in the future of Millsaps 
College.” 

Dr. Watkins was followed by Mr. A. 
Boyd Campbell, one of the most active 
men in the Alumni Associat’on. In 
speaking for the Alumni of the col- 
lege, he said that he was ready to 
pledge full support to the college in its 
athletic programs. Although the As- 
sociation is working thoroughly at 
present only among the Jackson 
alumni, it is expected that very soon 
the organization will reach with its 
plans the entire alumni of Millsaps 
College. 

At this point the toastmaster per- 
mitted Cheer-Leader Stokes to take 
a hand in the program. Then follow- 
ed ten minutes of enthusiastic yelling 
for the “old team.” “Che-he, che-ha” 
and “Rap, tap, tap” rang out for the 
last time in 1921. 

Capt. Windham Speaks 
When quiet returned to the hall 
once more, Captain Windham, of the 
team of 1921, arose to utter h’s senti- 
ments. He granted that his team has 
lost a number of games, but he said 
that the Millsaps team of ’21 is the 
best bunch of men he has ever worked 
with. W'ndham’o talk was received 
with hearty enthusiasm. 

Prof. M. C. White was the next 
speaker. In his usual quiet and mod- 
est manner, this man, who has per- 
haps in the year and a half of his 
presence here done more for our 
athletics than any other person on the 

(Continued on page 2) 



“Hamlet: His Task and His 
Problems,” Is 
Subject 

Shortly before the Christmas holi- 
days the first of the open lectures by 
Millsaps’ professors was given by 
Professor White, who had for his 
subje"t, “Hamlet, His Task and His 
Problems.” The audience was impress- 
ed with Professor White as a student of 
Shakespeare, and found his interpre- 
tation of the much debated tragedy 
logical and convincing. 

As an introduction to the discussion 
of Hamlet’s task, a number of mis- 
leading theories were taken up and ex- 
plained. Of these, the most widely ac- 
cepted is that Hamlet was a weak- 
willed, procrastinating hero, and that 
his struggle was against internal 
rather than against external forces. 
Another question, one which has 
"’"“U rise to numberless arguments, 
is “Did Hamlet really go mad?” Also, 
an expos’tion was made of some popu- 
lar ideas of Shakespeare’s day which 
must be understood if one is to know 
the true purport of the play; among 
these were the ideas on marriage rela- 
tions, ghosts, and the influence of a 
man’s acts just before death on the 
fate of his soul. 

T " Claudius, the king, Hamlet had a 
worthy opponent, powerful not only in 
position, but in ab’lity and determina- 
tion as well. Such a matching of 
forces was necessary if there was to 
be a dramatic struggle. And dramatic 
(Continued on page 3) 

Y. W C.A.IN FINAL 

MEETING FOR 1921 



Personal and World Wide Importance 
of Christianity Discussed. 

It was nearly on the eve of Christ- 
mas that the last meeting of the Y. W. 
C. A. was held in the hut. During the 
business sess’on plans for the New 
Year were discussed. The social serv- 
ice committee suggested that each girl 
agree to do some personal work while 
she was enjoying the holidays. The 
members decided to do all they could 
toward showing the little folks at the 
two orphanages a good time down town 
or to assist with Christmas baskets 
and trees. Contributions to the Euro- 
pean Student Fund were also solicited 
at this meeting. 

An interesting program, showing the 
importance of Christianity personally 
and to the world, and show'ng in what 
respects the dream of religion has 
come true through the religion of 
Christ, was heard and enjoyed by all 
who were fortunate enough to be pres- 
ent. 

With the beginning of a new term 
and a New Year, the Y. W. C. A. girls 
are very hopeful for the greatest suc- 
cess they have yet had in becoming a 
potent factor in the lives of the girls 
who are enjoying the benefits of Mill- 
saps. 



Collins and Windham are 
Presidents — Brooks and 
Shearer, Vice -PresTs 

The Lamar Literary Society met 
Friday evening December 16, 1921. 

Having been called to order by the 
President and led in prayer by the 
Chaplain, it heard the first roll call 
and the reading of the minutes of the 
last meeting. Mr. Norman B. Gillis, 
having signified his desire to join, was 
received as a member. 

The society then proceeded to elect 
the officers for the third and fourth 
terms and the inter-society speakers 
for the remainder of the session. The 
election resulted as follows: 

Officers for third term — President, 
Collins; Vice-President, Brooks; Re- 
cording Secretary, Joyner; Treasurer, 
Abney ; Corresponding Secretary, 
Knoblock; Critic, Lotterhos; Censor, 
Tuml’n; Sergeant-at-Arms, Triplett; 
Chaplain, Watson. 

Officers for fourth term- — President, 
Windham; Vice-President, Shearer; 
Recording Secretary, Joyner; Treas- 
urer, Abney; Corresponding Secre- 
tary. Knoblock," Critic, Lotterhos; 
Censor, Cassity; Sergeant-at-Arms, 
Collins; Chaplain, Clarke. 

, Inter-Society Speakers — Commence- 
ment debate, Carr and Knoblock; mid- 
session debate, Mullen and Shearer. 

The business of election having been 
completed, the society took up the 
regular program with the debate, the 
Orator and the Declaimer being ab- 
[ sent. The question, “Resolved, That 
all labor questions should be ar- 
bitrated,” was well debated by Clarke 
and Allred of the affirmative, and 
Cassity and Triplett of the negative. 
Decision was rendered in favor of the 
negative. 

Ellis was elected monthly orator, 
the Critic made his report, second roll 
call was dispensed with and the so- 
city adjourned. 

LEGISLATURE OPENS 

SESSI ON A T CAPITAL 

The M’ssissippi Legislature began 
its sessions at the State Capitol 
on Tuesday at noon. The first day 
was marked by the preparations for 
regular organization for business. 

The feature of the day was the ad- 
dress delivered before the House of 
Representatives by Senator Pat Har- 
rison. The, Senator presented a sur- 
vey of the political situation in the 
United States, and especially pointed 
out the deficiencies and failures of the 
Republican party. According to Sen- 
ator Harrison only one worthy piece 
of legislation was the result of the 
Republican labors in the recent ses- 
sion, and that bill was drafted by two 
Democrats and a Republican. 

The Legislature will be in session 
for two or three months and offers a 
great opportunity to the Millsaps Col- 
lege students to see their government 
in action. No student can afford to 
miss attending at least a few of the 
meetings of the legislative body of 
his state. 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



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ACME BAKERY COMPANY 
Jackson Miss. 



i 



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Clothing Made to Measure by Ed. V. Price & Co. 



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Telephone 415 



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“M’s” Awarded to 

17 Football Men 

(Continued from page 1) 
campus, went to the very heart of the 
situation. The trend of his words was 
toward the future. He was especially 
cordial in his reference to the teams 
of the Academy and of Jackson High, 
and expressed to them his interest, 
and the interest of our college, in 
them. 

In response to the welcome extend- 
ed to the visitors. Ball, the Academy 
heavy-weight tackle, stated that the 
team was glad to be present at the 
banquet, and that he, himself, expects 
to oust some self-satisfied college man 
from his place on the team next year. 

Prof. J. L. Roberts, coach of the 
Jackson High School team, extended 
thanks for the invitation to him and 
his team to be present on the occasion, 
and spoke of the friendship which he 
feels to exist between his school and 
Millsaps College. 

Coach Freeland Applauded 

Coach Freeland next took the floor 
amidst the long continued applause of 
the students. Finally, when the noise 
had subsided, Mr. Freeland went at 
length into the athletic situation at 
Millsaps. He expressed confidence 
that our teams will soon be in shape 
to contend on equal terms with the 
best teams of this section. With the 
first two, the most difficult years of 
intercollegiate football behind us, he 
feels that we can begin now to expect 
to take a permanent place on the ath- 
letic map. He said that the record of 
our team as a hard and clean fight- 
ing aggregation has been established 
this year. All that is needed is more 
material. And in this connection, the 
Coach expressed confidence that, in 
spite of the dark cloud hanging over 
us in the form of the new S. I. A. A. 
one year rule, we will find some way 
to play our freshmen next year. He 
said that if three years of college 
athletics is good for a boy, four years 
of it is good for him. 

Hr. D. M. Key, Faculty Chairman of 
Athletics, said also, “I believe that we 
will play freshmen next year.” He fur- 
thermore uttered his appreciation of 
the clean sportsmanship record of 
Millsaps College and its teams. 

The substance of the entire gather- 
ing was confidence in the future of 
M'llsaps College, and enthusiasm for 
its immediate future, or present, ath- 
letic programs. With the desire for 
athletic success was constantly ex- 
pressed pride for the Millsaps ath- 
letic spirit. 

At the close of his talk, Coach Free- 
land, the man who in a mere few 
months has won the hearts of the stu- 
dents and especially of h's football 
men and who has given to the college 
confidence that football will be suc- 
cessful here, presented “letters” to the 
men of his squad who had earned 
them. The list of the men who have 
won this highest athletic honor fol- 
lows. There are seventeen men in the 
list. 

Windham, Scott, McEwen, Mussle- 
white, J. W. Young, Culley, Reeves, 
Carr, Campbell, Overall, McNair, C. 
Galloway, Brooks, Hunnicutt, Daven- 
port, Fowler, Stovall. 

Reeves Elected Captain 

One of the final parts of the pro- 
gram for the even'ng was the election 
of a Captain for the team of 1922. Bal- 
lots were passed to the letter men just 
created, and they were instructed to 
I write the man of their choice on the 
| papers. The votes were quickly 
I counted and R. B. Reeves was de- 
! dared elected on the first ballot. 



Captain Reeves was fullback during 
the past season, but was unfortu- 
nately kept out of most of the games 
on account of injuries. He should make 
an excellent captain for the team of 
next year. He rose to express his ap- 
preciation of the honor cast upon him, 
and soon demonstrated to h ! s hearers 
that he is a speaker as well as a foot- 
ball player. 

As he took his seat the students 
were led in a rousing cheer for the 
new captain of football. This incident 
was followed by an address on the 
part of President Bufkin of the Alumni 
Association. After his interesting 
talk, the meet’ng came to a close, and 
with it our football season of 1921. 



IS IT ANY WONDER? 



A man was one day visiting a lunatic 
asylum, and while walking in the 
grounds he met a patient, to whom he 
said. 

“Well, how did you get here?” 

The man replied: 

“Well, sir, you see, I married a 
widow with a grown-up daughter and 
then my father married my wife’s 
daughter and made my wife the 
mother-in-law of her father-in-law 
and my father became my stepson. 
Then my stepmother, the daughter of 
my wife, had a son; and that boy, of 
course was my brother, because he 
was the son of my father; but he was 
also the son of my wife’s daughter, 
and therefore, her grandson, and that 
made me grandfather of my step- 
brother. Then my wife had a son; so 
my mother-in-law, the sister of my son, 
Is also his grandmother, because he 
is her stepson’s child; my father is the 
brother-in-law of my child because his 
stepsister is my wife; I am the 
brother of my own son, who is also the 
son of my step-grandmother; I am my 
mother’s brother-in-law; my wife is 
her own child’s aunt; my son is my 
father’s nephew, and I am my own 
grandfather. 

“That’s why I am here, sir.” — Ex. 



THE TEST. 



The test of a man is the fight he 
makes, 

The grit he daily shows 
The way that he stands on his feet 
and takes 

Fate’s numerous bumps and blows. 
A coward can smile when there’s 
naught to fear 

When nothing his progress bars, 
But it takes a man to stand up and 
cheer 

While some other fellow stars. 

Tt isn’t the victory after all, 

But the fight that a brother makes. 

ho driven aga’nst the wall. 

Still stands up erect and takes 
The blows of fate with his head held 
high 

and bruised and pale. 

Is the man who’ll win in the by and 

by, 

For he isn’t afraid to fail. 

It’s the bumps you get, and the jolts 
you get. 

And the shock that your courage 
stands, 

The hour of sorrow and vain regret 

The prize that escapes your hands 
That test your mettle and prove your 
worth, 

It isn’t the blows you deal, 

But the blows you take on this good 
old earth 

That shows if your stuff is real. 

—Selected 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



White Presents Shakes- 
pearian Lecture 

(Continued from page 1) 



it certainly was; the conflict which 
began with Hamlet’s feeling of shame 
and indignation at the hasty marriage 
of his mother and uncle was stimu- 
lated by the appearance of the dead 
king’s ghost, with its horrifying 
ementa. But not yet was the pru- 
dent Hamlet ready to make any cer- 
tain accusation against Claudius. The 
nature of the visitation was not 
known — a devil, it might have been, 
come to deceive, instead of the king’s 
s-’rit, seeking revenge. 

In his uncertainty, Hamlet chose a 
r eeming madness as the bes, 

means of spying unsuspected upon 
Claudius. With this madness, called 
genius by so many Shakespearian stu- 
dents, he did not completely succeed 
in deceiving his enemies, and all his 
speeches to friends, and remarks 
a ! ”'de, show that he was consciously 
and with some effort imitating a mad 
person. The artifice was slow ! n ef- 
fecting any result, and, when the strol- 
ling players came, Hamlet was quick 
to grasp an opportunity for immedi- 
ate action. His clever plan succeeded; 
the king’s guilt was proven not only 
to the jealous nephew but also to the 
more neutral Horatio. 

punish — no more remained. A 
well-aimed dagger stroke, and Ham- 
let’s task was done. He could not, 
though, obtain the chance, for Clau- 
dius was suspicious of him, and was 
seated on the throne of a kingdom, 
surrounded by guards. One single op- 
portunity presented itself, when the 
king was at prayer. “Now might I do 
it pat,” he sa d, but stayed his hand. 
To kill the murderer at that moment, 
would be to send his soul to heaven. 
His hatred was held back by a desire 
for a revenge which would kill the soul 
with the body. The time to strike 
seemed to come when Polonius moved 
behind the curtain. Hamlet struck, 
but blind fate had fooled him. 

Hamlet’s treatment of OpheTa is the 
thing most difficult of explanation in a 
sane man, but it seems that his ex- 
citement, and ■ the feeling that she 
was conspiring with the others against 
him, may account for th ; s. And his 
course while away from Denmark, his 
handling of the king’s messengers and 
his fight against the pirates, shows a 
man of judgment and of action. In the 
closing incident, the death scene, 
Hamlet was successful in h:s long- 
postponed blow, an dcompleted in his 
dying agony the task to which he had 
dedicated his purpose. 



“CARRIER CURRENT” 



Newest Communication System 



Through a new method of electrical 
communication it is possible to send 
a telephone message over a trolley 
wire from a moving electric train. The 
trolley wire while supplying power to 
the train also acts as a conductor of 
another or second current which is 
superimposed upon it at a higher fre- 
quency. 

At any convenient point along the 
line this second or “carrier current” 
may be picked up and carried short dis- 
tances through the air where it may 
be made to operate a telephone in- 
strument. The system may be used 
for communication between engineers 
of different trains on the same road, 
between the locomotive at the head 
of a long freight train and the caboose 
at the rear, or between the engineer 



and distant substations or terminals. 

A demonstration of the system was 
given recently before a group of prom- 
inent railway men, by the General 
Electric Company. 



MAKING TUNGSTEN 
DUCTILE 

By Dr. Irving Langmuir 

Until 1904, tungsten had been known 
for a century and a quarter only in its 
unrefined state. Its value as a harden- 
ing alloy had, it is true, been recog- 
nized and appreciated. In 1905 and 
thereafter the metal, mixed with paste 
and squirted through dies, had given 
the incandescent lamp its most effi- 
cient filament but the brittleness of 
this filament caused great embarrass- 
ment to electric lamp makers and 
users alike. 

For many years scientists had sought 
a process for mak’ng tungsten duc- 
tile. The feat was regarded as almost 
impossible by metallurgists. To make 
any ordinary metal soft, it is heated to 
a temperature above its annealing 
point and then cooled to room temper- 
ature. This process, however, left 
tungsten as brittle as ever. 

It was eventually found that the 
only way to make the metal ductile 
was to mash the grains out into 
fibrosity and thus make it ductile 
while cold. This was accomplished by 
first heating the tungsten to a tem- 
perature below its annealing point and 
then mechanically working it with in- 
finite care at a variety of degrees of 
heat, each less than the one preced- 
ing it, until it was at room tempera- 
ture. A similar treatment would, if 
applied to ordinary metal destroy their 
ductility. 

A process was worked out which, 
if followed without the slightest de- 1 
viation, stretched the grains out and 
the metal was made ductile; but if 
the working varied from this process, 
failure resulted. The tungsten would 
break at a stroke, when cold. 

Thus, after years of patient labor 
f triumph of far-reaching consequence 
in the field of research was rewarded. 

The filament produced had a start- 
ling tensile strength — about 600,000 
pounds per square inch for wire one- 
thousandth of an inch in diameter. 
It was so pliable that it could be 
wound into any form safely and hand- 
led with no thought of its breaking. 

Wolframite is the most important 
tungsten ore. It is obtained from both 
Korea and the Un’ted States. Extrac- 
tion from the ore is comparatively 
simple, yielding metallic tungsten in 
the form of powder of various density. 
This powder is formed into ingots by 
great hydraulic pressure — not by fu- 
sion. The melting point of tungsten 
is about 3350° C., being higher than 
for any other known metal. From in- 
gots to fine wire there are many steps 
every one important, in the complicat- 
ed process. 

The tungsten filament has doubled 
the efficiency of incandescent lamps 
and provides a white light of far pur- 
er quality than any lamp heretofore 
known. It has provided new targets 
for X-ray tubes, phonograph needles 
fifty times as efficient as any that 
preceded them, better ignition con- 
tacts for automobiles, and many other 
new articles and improvements of old i 
ones. 

The story of ductile tungsten is one I 
of the romances of research — the epic. ! 
of accomplishing the “impossible”. 



A country is not made great by the 
number of square miles it contains, I 
but by the number of square people it i 
contains. — Emory Wheel. 



OUR FIRST DISPLAY 

FALL AND WINTER STYLES 
Fine SUITS and OVERCOATS 

The House of 

Kuppenheimer 

Same High Grade Values 
PRICES ONE-THIRD LOWER 

The New trend in fashion for loose sensible lines 
accurately designed into wonderful fabrics of Her- 
ringbone Pencil Stript and Plaid Patterns. 

D0WNING=L0CKE CO. 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 



CORRECT STYLES in FOOTWEAR 

FOR COLLEGE MEN 

BUFKIN SHOE COMPANY 

172 East Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



| THE DANIEL STUDIO 

| The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. 

1 NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 







Picking Cotton by Electricity 

A device consisting of a farm tractor 
equipped with an electric generator 
is being used successfully in the 
Northern cotton belt to pick cotton 
with electricity’s aid. Hollow flexible 
tubes reabh far out in four directions 
from the tractor. On the end of each 
is a set of revolving brushes encased in 
a small metal frame, with an opening 
about the size of a man’s double fists, 
and sufficently large to take a boll of 
cotton. The brushes are driven by an 
electric motor through a flexible drive 
shaft and revolve inwardly, or toward 
each other. This creates a comb-like 
movement which pulls the cotton from 
the plant the moment it comes is con- 
tact with the brushes. It is then suck- 
ed up the hollow tube and deposited 
in a receptacle carried on the tractor. 
Tests have indicated that the new 
electric cotton picker makes it possi- 
ble for a person to gather from 400 to 
700 pounds of cotton a day as com- 
pared with 70 to 150 by hand. 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 

T. B. D O X E Y 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 



Spain has begun the electrification 
of her railways. The first contract for 
a stretch of forty miles was placed 
with an American concern, the Inter- 
national General Electric Company. 
Extensive electrification of the Span- 
ish roads which run through moun- 
tainous territory, is expected to fol- 
low. 



A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 



Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 



213 North Liberty Street 



Baltimore, Md. 



[ 



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i 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription ; $1.25 

Additional Subscription .. 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 

Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 



STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 

Athletic Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor- 
Associate Editor- 
Associate Editor- 
Associate Editor— 



Fred Lotterhos 

Walter Stokes 

E. K. Windham 

-Mack Swearingen 



-Miss Daley Crawford 

J. W. Sells 

— M. M. McGowan 



REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, O. B. Triplett, R. H. Moore, 
Wendell Phillips, J. S. Barbour, Miss Delta Stevens, Leigh Watkins, J. B. 
Shearer, J. D. Mullen, Miss Mildred Brashear, A. L. Joyner, D. F. McNeil, H. 
L. Villee. 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager- 
Circulation Manager 



_ H. B. Collins 
— Geo. Watts 
_G. K. Hebert 



DOING THINGS IN A BIG WAY 



Millsaps College is a small institution numerically. That fact, 
however, need not be considered a handicap. The size of a school 
has little to do with its value and strength ; rather the spirit that 
animates it and the manner in which it does what it undertakes 
mark a college as great or as trifling. 

An institution that is growing in vigor, and in usefulness, and 
in ideals is a power regardless of its size. Some colleges of no 
greater size than is our own are known all over the South and all 
over the nation. Those colleges do things in a big way. 

This doing things in a big way applies first to the administra- 
tion of a college and to the faculty. If the leaders and rulers of the 
institution are narrow and restricted in their ideas and in their am- 
bitions for the school, the school is doomed to mediocrity. On the 
other hand, if they are big enough to know what is needed in a 
first class educational unit and how to get the things that are needed 
the school in question cannot be held down to anything short of 
the top rank 

For a school to hold a high place among its neighbors it is 
also necessary for its students to do things in a big way. The man 
who has been selected to represent his college in some capacity 
must put his whole soul into the contest which he is to enter. For 
after all a college is judged to a large extent by its success or fail- 
ure in meeting its rivals in athletic and intellectual struggles. 

If every man who has any possibility as an athlete would train 
as hard as the man who actually wins a place on the team, material 
would soon accumulate to such an extent that the greatest difficulty 
of a coach would be in deciding who should not be on the team. 
A group of two hundred men. by concentrating its efforts, can pro- 
duce teams that will overcome rivals of larger size. 

The same thing holds true in regard to mental contests. A 
college that sends out debating teams that have put their best into 
preparation and that have been selected from eager groups of con- 
testants, can win successive victories whether or not the student 
body is large. The man who has been selected to stand for his col- 
lege in any capacity is duty bound to give his best. When he does 
that he is doing something in a big way. 

Class officers, social committees, Y. M. C. A. cabinet members, 
leaders in literary societies, officers of fraternities — all have some- 
thing to do, and if they will perform their duties properly their 
school will gradually come to be known as a big school. 

The man in the small town that does his work well will succeed ; 
the man in the largest city in the world that does not do his work 
well will fail. So it is with the college. Large or small, it depends 
for its standing and for its usefulness on the manner in which its ad- 
ministrators, its professors, and its students perform their several 
tasks. 



Good habits mean good health. 



Rest is a good thing in its place, but too much of it clogs the 
mind, enervates the body, and weakens the character. 



THE EMPORIUM 

We are Featuring This Season 

Two-Pants Suits 

— for Young Men 




at 



$35.00 

ALWAYS FRESH 

ALWAYS PRESSED 

Young men who like to practice econ- 
omy and at the same time get satis- 
factory service combined with style 
and snap, will be delighted with these 
two-pants suits. 

They meet every requirement of qual- 
ity clothes — In style---ln fabrlc---ln 
workmanship. 



SOLD WITH OUR SPECIAL GUARANTEE 
OF ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION 




Correct Clothes 
for College Men 

Harris 9 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Pantaze 
Cafe ; 

v. 4 * > , 1 

Jackson’s Pride 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

CLEANLINESS 

WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 

All kinds of 
Sea Foods 
in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



In books are many lessons that we will never get out, and out 
of books are many lessons that we will never put in them. 



Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE’’ 







THE PURPLE AND WHITE 






il 



^Irrri 



#tcatford Clctlieic 

When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Pall and Winter dis- 
play of 

^tratforb Clotfjes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 



' Men's k 




Wear 



•After Every Meal" 







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X FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

The Flavor Lasts! 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25— Galloway Hall 
Representative 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS. 



i }> 

THE CAVE-MAN STUFF. 

— 

If you wanna win a woman, 
Just treat ’er kinda rough, 
Canse a woman’s crazy ’bout 
The cave man stuff. 



If you wanna win a woman. 

Just act like you was tough. 

Cause a woman’s wild about 
The cave-man stuff. 

Oh, a woman’s wild about 
The cave-man stuff. 

Oh, a woman wants the man 
Who’s filled chuck-full o’ bluff. 

She don’t want no “jelly” 

Nor no s’Tly “powder puff,” 

Cause a woman’s wild about 
The cave-man stuff. 

I 

I DON’T WANT TO BE BAD. 

I don’t want to be bad, 

' But I sure would like 
To “roll my own” 

An’ be a “vamp” 

An’ “bob” my hair. 

I don’t want to be bad 
But, oh, how I wish 
Some big, good-lookin’ man 
Would grab me up in his arms 
An’ say I was cute 
An’, oh, so sensible 
An’- — but of course I don’t wanna be 
bad. 

— 

! THE LIGHT WITHIN YOUR EYES. 

— 

A little gleam of mystery 
Shines from those eyes of thine; 

I wonder,, dear ...what it could mean. 
Whene’er they shine in mine, 
l 

! I wonder love, if it can tell 
Aught of the future years, 

Aught of the joys and happiness, 
Aught of the cares and tears. 

I look in them and see the light 
That doth so softly gleam. 

And sr ouestion ever comes. 

Oh, what, dear, can it mean? 

I wonder if it speaks of love 
| And of such earthly things 

As life, and love, and happiness. 

That the Bluebirds brings. 

The Bluebird brings us happiness. 

And if it comes to me, 

Your love will glow within my heart 
And there enthroned shall be. 

FACILITY. 

So easy ’tis to make a rhyme 
That did the world but know it, 

A freshman might Parnassus climb, 

A sophie be a poet. 

Then, oh, how charming it would be 
when in haste hysteric, 

A Prof, called on a fresh and found 
He’d grappled with a lyric. 



f 



SMART CLOTHES 



FOR 



YOUNG MEN 



MADE BY HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 



They’re finely tailored by hand in the 
finest all-wool fabrics — exclusive pat- 
terns and NEW Styles. Satisfaction 
or money back. A hearty welcome 
awaits you at — 



“Jackson’s Best Store” 

KENNINGTON’S 

WALK-OVER AND HANAN SHOES 



And, oh, what joy he’d always wield 
If to his girl he just could tell 
Hi" Miming love for her sweet self 
In touching bit of rondel. 

And then when out he went to dine 
And the cook brought in the salad 

” "Id slip upon her plate 

A sweet and tender ballad. 

And “all is fair In love and war,” 
But if you’d just ask me. 

T’d explain the way to win 
Lies In your facility. 



H* T. Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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| FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE 

j Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 



i South State Street 



JACKSON, MISS. 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




“What is strange about that?” 
“Why, that anything so dark could 
be so light.” 



It may be a good thing that the 
submarines are able to sink them- 
selves. 



"You keep still tonight” said the 
bootlegger to his wife as he went out. 



WANTED — A man with a good watch 
to keep time for the orchestra. 



DUCKY SAYS— “When I hear a man 
say, ‘Everyone has his price’ I know 
one who has, and if I had an extra 
two cent stamp I would buy him.” 



Jimmie Campbell — “I wish that the 
Naval Holiday would hurry up and 
come; I am tired of going to school.” 



Though college days 
Have their delights 
They can’t compare 
With college nights. — Ex. 

Ducky — “What institution in Eng 
land compares with Congress? 

Jim Sells — “The British Museum.” 



Just keep this in mind. 

It is true of the most — 

The less a man does. 

The more he will boast. 

— Exchange. 



Co-ed — “I don’t mind quarreling be- 
cause I like to make up.” 

Heartless (with examining stare) — 
“I see that you like to make up.” 



“Willie, where did you get that 
black eye?” 

"Johnny Smith hit me.” 

“I hope you remember what your 
Sunday school teacher said about 
heaping coals on the heads of your 
enemies.” 

“Well ma, I didn’t have any coals, 
so I just stuck his head in the ash 
barrel.” — Ex. 



My father never hit me with a 
switch in his life. 

Another wreck due to a misplaced 
switch. — Ex. 



If many more improvements are 
made on the gym, we will have to re- 
fer to it as James. 



Windham — “Can you tell me where 
the moonshine comes from?” 

Stokes — “That’s a secret still.” 



Soph — “Where is the clutch in a 
car?” 

Fresh — “On the back seat.” 



Watson — “I can’t tell where I came 
from, the way the Bible is written.” 
Prof. Bowen — “Mr. Watson, the Bi- 
ble wasn’t written to tell where you 
came from, but to tell you where you 
are going.” 



Prof. White — “Name eleven of 
Shakespear’s plays.” 

Fresh — “Ten Nights in a Bar Room 
and the Merchant of Venice.” 



Shanks — “I’m going to get ahead 
next month, no matter how hard the 
exams are.” 

Dr. Mitchell — “Well, I am sure you 
need one.” 



Prof. White — “What is Rhetoric?” 
Fresh — “Language in a dress suit.” 



Shearer in History — “Knowledge is 
what we want and want badly. Ask 
the average man when Magna Carta 
was King of England and he can’t tell I 
you.” 



He — “If I married a widow named 
Elizabeth, with two children, what 
would I get?” 

She — “Give up.” 

He — "A second-hand lizzie and two 
runabouts.” 



Robert — “Let’s get married.” 

Roberta — “What’s your hurry? Let’s 
wait a while.” 

Bob — “Ever since I met you I hav- 
en’t been able to think about anything 
but you; I can’t sleep; I can’t eat. 
I’ve got to marry you so I can forget 
you.” 

"A strange thing happened in our 
street last week.” 

“What’s that?” 

“A nesro baby was born weighing 
only three pounds.” 



SAMBO AND THE BOOK 
OF PARABLES 

The following is an account of a 
conversation which took place between 
a Bishop and a negro who felt that 
he had been called to preach and had 
applied for ordination in the min- 
istry. 

“Can you read. Sambo?” 

“No suh, ah caint.” 

“Can you write?” 

“No sir, ah caint write, suh, but 
my wife is a right smart reader, yes 
she is, suh.” 

“Do you know the Bible?” 

“Yes suh, I’se pretty good in de 
Bible, suh. Ah knows my Bible from 
lid to lid.” 

“What part of the Bible do you 
like best, Sam?” 

“Well suh, I believes ah likes de 
New Testament de bes’, suh.” 

“What book of the New Testament 
do you like the best?” 

“The book of the parable, suh.” 

“And which parable do you like 
best?” 

“Why lawse! I likes de parable 
bout de good Samartain best of dem 
all; yes suh, ah does that.” 

“Well, tell me about the parable of 
the good Samaritan.” 

“Yes suh, ah sho will, suh.” 

“Once- upon a time a man went 
from Jerusalem to Jerico and fell 
among thieves and thorns grew up 
and choked that man, and he went on 
and didn’t have any money, and he 
met the Queen of Sheba and she gave 
that man a thousand talents of gold 
and a hundred changes of raiments 
and he got in a charrot and drove 
furiously, and while he was driving 
under a big tree his hair caught among 
the limbs and he hung there many 
days and nights and the ravens 
brought him food to eat and water to 
drink, and that night while he was 
hanging there asleep, his wife come 
along and cut off his hair and he fell 
on stony ground and it rained for 
forty days and forty nights, and he hid 
himself in a cave, and he met a man 
who said come in and have supper 
with me, and he said I married a wife 
and .can’t. So the man went out in 
the highways and byways and com- 
pelled him to' come in and have sup- 
per with him, and he went on to Je 
rusalem and saw the queen Jizzible 
sitting high up in a window and when 
she saw him she laughed, and they 
throwed her down, and he said throw 
her down some mo and they threw 
her down seventy-seven times, and of 
the fragments they picked up twelve 
baskets. Now, suh, Whose wife do 
you think she will be in the day of 
Judgment?” 



hristmas (gifts 

OF DISTINCTION 

BURR, PATTERSON & CO. 



MANUFACTURING FRATERNITY JEWELERS 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



Mr. W. H. Beck, Jr. 

Will be at the Edwards Hotel November 
25-26, with samples of the NEWEST 
creations in JEWELRY and NOVELTIES 



SEND FOR “A GIFT BOOK FOR MODERN GREEKS” 



R. H. GREEN 

Wholesale (iroeer 

Feed Manufacturer ( old Storage 



Jackson, Miss. 



TURNING WAR’S 
KNOWLEDGE TO 
PEACE TIME USE 



By E. W. Davidson. 

The lessons we learned at war were 
multitudinous. The boundaries of hu- 
man knowledge were pushed far afield. 
But how is the world to profit by it 
all? 

The answer comes from the Engi- 
neering Foundation, which in a report 
on cooperation in industrial research 
declares that America is entering on 
an “era of industrial research in 
which corporations large and small 
are linked with government agencies, 
engineering organizations, and uni- 
versities in a systematic effort to sal- 
vage the knowledge gained in war and 
turn it to peace time use in order to 
awaken the nation’s latent industrial 
and economic power.” 

And the research laboratories of the 
land are to play a large part in this 
invaluable work. It is the highest 
tribute this country ever paid to those 
scientific workshops and to the men 
in them — scientists, engineers, experi- 
menters, in a word “Inventors” — who 
were once scorned as futile, puttering 
fellows by all-wise Business. 

For years these industrial “inven- 
tion shops" of America have been con- 
scientiously at work pioneering con- 
stantly into the unknown, producing 
achievements of industrial value or of 
purest science or nothing, as success 
attended or failed to attend their ef- 
forts. The great laboratories of the 
United States Steel Corporation 
showed how to build better rails and 
more dependable frames for sky 
scrapers. Those of the Du Pont in- 
terests produced more serviceable ex- 
plosives and a wider range of valuable 
by-products. The Eastman laboratories 
continuously make photography easier 
and more accurate. Swift and Com- 
pany’s “inventors” do wonders with 
foods. 

The General Electric Company’s 275 
scientists engineers and allied work- 



kODAKS 

Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak F'ilni Developing 
a Specialty 

EYR1CH & CO. 



osl-j 



Comics, Cartons, Commercial News 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 
Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 

SPALDING FOR SPORT 




When Purchasing Athletic Equipment 
Insist Upon 

“SPALDING’S" 

SATISFACTION IS INEVITABLE 
Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

130 Carondelet St. — New Orleans 



ers, both men and women, in the big 
laboratory at Schenectady, save the 
country a billion dollars every year 
on Its electric light bills through im- 
provements In incandescent lamps. 
And so it goes, the nation over. More 
than 1200 companies have laboratories. 
More than 9000 men and women woYk 
in them. They serve the people of 
the whole world by cheapening and 
bettering goods, finding substitutes 
more satisfactory than original pro- 
ducts and continually giving humanity 
more comfort, more happiness and 
more to live for. 



ELECTROGRAPHS 

More than twenty vessles ranging 
in size from a small fire boat to big 
Atlantic freighters and warships, are 
now propelled by electricity in the 
United States. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 



THE BETRAYAL 

OF HOTRADISH 



Hotradish uneasily glanced at the 
clock, then at the teacher, finally at 
the meaningless hierographics on his 
tablet. It was the last period of the 
day; it was the last school day of the 
week; It was the afternoon of the 
great game with Sugar Hill. Hence 
the industry of Hotradish; hence the 
immaculate record, of his day’s work 
that lay behind him. Miss Beavers 
was not going to get a chance to keep 
him in. Hotradish sighed with inward 
relief. 

“It’s all settin’ pretty,” he thought, 
“Doggone that clock, ten and a half 
minutes more,” and he bent over his 
writing book with manifest and ap- 
parent industry. Even the grim faced 
spinster engaged in teaching seemed 
almost kind, as he thought of the com- 
ing game and murmured inaudibly to 
himself, “Twenty-nine, thirty-eight 
hep, sixty-one, twenty-four, hep, 
(pause) Hit that man. Shotgun, what 
you think this is?” And he beheld 
himself bawling out his erstwhile boon 
companion before the admiring gaze of 
their rival object of affection. 

To the right of Hotradish sat Shot- 
gun, he of the crafty brain and morbid 
visage. Naturally he was also think- 
ing of the game, but without the com- 
plete pleasure that marked his rival’s 
thoughts. 

“Doggone it, ole Hotradish is gonna 
get my job after all, doggone it,” he 
thought bitterly as he pictured himself 
playing in the more ignoble position 
of guard, where the principal and 
coach of the school, in the person of 
Professor Jenkins, had placed him. 

“Doggone it he better not bawl me 
out before Lorelle,” he whispered vin- 
dictively to himself, again repeating 
his terrific oath of “Doggone it.” 
From which it may be gathered that 
Hotradish and Shotgun were rivals in 
th’s young lady’s affections. 

Shotgun covertly regarded his 
hated rival and then Lorelle. Did she 
know who would be quarter that af- 
ternoon? “Golly,” Shotgun thought 
still bitterly, “Mr. Jenkins sure will put 
me in the line where I haven’t a 
chance, sure as ole Hotradish’s there, 
and ole Hotradish’ll make a touch- 
down or somethin’ an’ Lorellell just 
nacherly quit me an’” but here a 
thought struck him — what if Hotradish 
couldn’t play. 

“If ole Miss Beavers’d just catch him 
doin’ somethin’, he’d have to stay in,” 
he reasoned. “Staying in” was a thing 
unalterable. Miss Beavers had a heart 
of flint, and was naturally averse to 
athletics, being an old maid. Hotra- 
dish was a fifth grade student to her, 
not a football star. Shotgun well knew 
this and was only restrained from do- 
ing bodily violence to Hotradish to 
make him yelp aloud, by the knowl- 
edge that it would also eliminate him 
from the game. 

To heighten his indignation, Shot- 
gun saw Lorelle steal a glance of un- 
concealed admiration towards the 
loathsome Hotradish. A week "before 
those glances had filled his own heart 
w’th warmth and cheer, but that was 
before Mr. Jenkins had moved him 
from quarterback. 

"Guess she thinks he’s some pun- 
kins,” he soliloquized bitterly. “Ole 
smart aleck, I’ll fix him.” A heavenly 
i’e quivered on his lips as he la- 
boriously indited a few hurried sen- 
tences on a scrap of paper and held up 
his hand. 



“What is it, Tom Roy?” caustically 
asked Miss Beavers, interrupted from 
grading the day’s theme papers. 

“May I give Lorelle her book?” 
gently asked the wily one. 

“School will soon be out; give it to 
her then,” answered the teacher, sus- 
picious after the manner of her kind, 
and knowing .that such thoughtfulness 
on the part of Shotgun could not be 
wholly disinterested. 

“B-but she ought to be studying it 
n-now,” fenced Shotgun. This was 
unanswerable logic; it was fact. Miss 
Beavers also instinctively felt that 
there was some trick, but she was 
busy, and for once adopted the easiest 
method, asked no embarrassing ques- 
tions as to how the English came into 
Shotgun’s possession, and did not even 
note that already Lorelle was delving 
into the mysteries of sentences and 
theme building from what was un- 
mistakably an English book. She only 
nodded a curt “all right.” 

So the gods smiled on Shotgun, and 
his book, with a note under the cover, 
was deftly laid at the feet of Shot- 
gun's queen, or to speak more prosai- 
cally on her desk. 

The note brought a scowl to Miss 
Lorelle’s usually placid features. Weil 
it might, for the inscription and word- 
ing of the message was simple and 
to the point. She hurriedly wrote, 
“All light, Mr. Smarty, take Madge to 
the game, and see if I care,” and she 
dropped her pencil to gain Hotra- 
uish’s attention. So distracted was he, 
mentally marshalling his grim line of 
fighting football heroes, that he took 
u notice, so she was obliged to cough 
and drop her pencil again before he 
looked her way. “Won’t even look at 
me,” she thought bitterly as she covet- 
ly showed him the note, and was too 
enraged to notice that in attracting 
Kotrad’sh she had also focused the 
t jacher’s attention upon herself. Truly 
love is blind. But Hotradish noticed, 
aad made desperate signs, but these 
were lost on the sender of the note. 

A little thump, an arc of white 
through the air, and the disastrous 
note fell on his desk. 

“Quinton,” came a stern command, 
“Bring me that note.” 

“Mam? - parried Hotradish lamely, 
f’ghting for time. 

“Bring me that note in your right 
hand, wait, keep that hand on your 
desk, will I have to come after it?” 

“What note,” he asked through mat- 
ter of form, but he well knew that the 
cause was hopeless. 

“Hurry up,” Miss Beavers ordered. 
Concealment of the note was impossi- 
ble with the eagle eye of the teacher 
on him. He was in desperate straits. 
If he obeyed, perhaps he could get 
out in time to play, but he would be 
do'ng the most traitorous of acts 
known ot school life, “turning in a 
note.” It would be read aloud, his girl 
lest forever. If he tore it up, throwing 
defiance in the face of the gods, then 
would come — the deluge. The girl or 
the game? His instincts conflicted, 
his heart was rent. Do not smile, you 
who look down on the ncidents of 
childhood as trivial. It was a momen- 
tous decision. 

A hush of expectancy arose over the 
room as the teacher bore down upon 
him. With a courage borne of despe- 
rate resolution, he tore the note into 
bits. It was anarchy, rank heresy, 
chaos. A tooth-rattling shaking, re- 
sentment by outraged dignity personi- 
fied, and Miss Beavers commanded 
bim to stay in, and promised dire pun- 
i-hment besides; but these were lost 
on Hotradish. As an afterthought 
Lorelle was also ordered to remain. 



Then the bell rang, and an orderly 
line of pupils marched out to mingle 
with the melee of children hurrying 
towards the football field located a 
half mile from the school. 

With the air of a martyred saint, Hot- 
radish took his none too gentle 
thrashing, took it before Lorelle, and 
felt some satisfaction in knowing that 
she would understand that it was all 
for her. At the end of an hour she 
was dismissed. At the end of an- 
other hour Hotradish was set at lib- 
erty until the following Monday. 
Would she be waiting for him, he 
wondered, or had she gone down to 
see the rest of the game? Was sacri- 
fice appreciated? 

As he left the school he saw her 
^"iting. She was his girl now, he re 
"e^ted. She was the pearl he had 
bought at a great price, and he walked 
towards her awaiting soft words. 

“Well, Mr. Smarty,” was her chill- 
ing remark. “You didn’t go to the 
game with Madge, and you won’t walk 
home with her.” Lorelle’s mission 
fulfilled, she turned and started to 
leave, with her martyr too dumfound- 
ed to speak. 

“Hey!” he called out to her re- 
treating figure, when words finally 
came, “I wasn’t going with her, who 
tole you I was?” 

“Shotgun did,” she retorted, wishing 
against hope that h : s denial was true. 

“Well, I wasn’t, and I’ll get ole durn 
Shotgun for telling that durn lie,” 
earnestly avowed Hotradish, taking 
heart. He could tell by her face that 
‘he psychological moment had come. 
Awkwardly he approached and tenta- 
tively reached for her books. Glory of 
glories, she made no resistance. 
“You’re my girl now,” he told her sim- 
ply. 

“I just naturally hate Shotgun,” was 
her sweet acquiescence. As they 
-'rolled up the street everything was 
a pink mist to Hotradish. 

After a few m'nutes of awkward 
conversation and much kicking of the 
earth with his shoe in front of his 
sweetheart’s gate the young swain 
wended his homeward way. The first 
exhiliration on the noble sacrifice and 
successful suit left him as he reflected 
on the game. His heart called for re- 
venge against the despisable Shot- 
gun. 

“Durn it, take that,” he said frown- 
•'ng aggressively and punching his im- 
aginary opponent. “Durn you, get up 
and fight,” he continued. “You old 
mean, durn liar,” but he shrunk from 
the recoil of his terrible curse word, 
and left his spectral fee prone on the 
ground. 

Feeling somewhat better for his dire 
correcting of Shotgun, even though 
wholly imaginary, he filled his 
chest with air, and strode on, until 
chance brought the matter to a climax 
and he beheld his enemy from afar. 
S'botgun knew by Hotradish’s manner 
that he came not as a friend, and fain 
would have taken the w'ngs of the 
morning and fled, but his meditated 
departure was restrained by seeing a 
vision of beauty, personified by a 
rather skrawny young lady of four- 
teen, approaching. His pride forbade 
flight before a lady. The look on his 
former friend's face showed Shotgun 
that metaphorically speaking, h's 
goose was cooked, but he marshalled 
his cunning and advanced with a dis- 
arming smile. 

“Ha, ha,” he laughed with a hollow 
attempt at mirth. “That was a good 
ole joke on you Hotradish, I jus’ told 
Lorelle that for fun. The game thi c — ” 
but a smoothe tongue was no longer 
-’-fficient, and in grim determinaron 



blows began to be lustily exchanged. 
Smothered soiinds t -j>f “Durn you, you 
old durn fool,” and “Now will you quit, 
doggone you” with frequent grunts and 
ouches, transpired from the sound and 
scuffle of conflict, until finally Shot- ( 
gun lay prone on his face, and only 
his kick'ng legs showed evidences of 
life, for on him a hundred and three 
pounds of determination, which was 
the corporeal part of Hotradish, held 
him securely. 

“Eat dirt,” commanded the victor. 
“Umm, Ummm, Pfff,” replied the un- 
der dog, spitting grass from his 
mouth. 

“I said dirt, durn it, not grass,” 
commanded Hotradish, and was soon 
rewarded by seeing the mouth under 
him spewing mud like a miniature 
volcano. 

“Got enough?” 

“Mmmmmmm Pfff mmmmm,” 

“All right, get up.” 

All malice was now gone from 
both. Lorelle was Hotradish’s girl. 
Shotgun’s duplicity was punished. 
The past was a closed book. 

“Mmmmm pfff, say Hotradish, the 
other team couldn’t get here, pfff, an’ 
they d'dn't have the game. It’s gonna 
be next Friday.” 

A strange happiness filled Hotra- 
dish's soul. He was at peace with the 
world. 

“Say, Shotgun,” was his generous 
retort, “I got some money, an’ it’s Fri- 
day night, guess where we’re going?” 

Shotgun was happy as he again be- 
came Hotradish’s slave and vassal. 
“To the good ole picture show,” he 
answered. 



What is considered the best Cross 
Country Team that has ever gone out 
from A. and M won a magnificent 
victory in the Southern Intercollegi- 
ate and Athletic Club Championship 
race over the B. A. C. course in Bir- 
mingham, Saturday, December 10th. 
The varsity captured first honors with 
the remarkable low score of 30 po’nts. 
Individual honors went to E. Richter* 
of the Birmingham Athletic Club who 
covered the three mile course in 15 
minutes and 47 2-5 seconds. — Ex. 



University of Mississippi has more 
Rhodes Scholars in Oxford than any 
other State University in the Union. — 
Mississippian. 



THE FIRST. 

A young negro was asked where he 
came from. He drew himself up 
proudly. I’m from the f'rst state in 
the Union, sah. 

“New York?” 

“No, sah, Alabama, sah.” 

“But Alabama isn’t the first state 
in the Union.” 

“Alphabetically speaking, sah; al- 
phabetically speaking!” 

— Sou. Western. 



Marshal Ferdinand Foch received a 
degree of L.L.D. from Tulane Uni- 
versity during the course of his visit 
to New Orleans ! n December. — The 
Tulane Hullabaloo. 



A Ham Joke. 

Byrd — “I live in my girl’s eyes.” 
Ledinsky — “Yes, I noticed she had a 
sty in them.” — Lord Jeff. 



“What do you think of the quota- 
tion, ‘Better to reign in Hell than 
serve in Heaven.’ ” 

“I don’t think much of it.” 

“Why not?’ 

“Well, first of all, I don’t believe it 
rains in Hell.” — Ex. 






8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



ORDER SEATS NOW— ALL SEATS 
RLflfeRVED 



II* MAJESTIC 



THREE DAYS — JANUARY 
12 - 13-14 



66 



The Greatest Film Spectacle Judged from Any Viewpoint 

D. W. GRIFFITH’S 



WAY DOWN EAST” 



ISTRIONE 



The Cozy Theatre 
Monday-Tuesday — 
“BONNIE BRIAR BUSH’’ 

With an All-Star Cast 

W ednesday-Thursday — 
Elaine Hammerstein 
“The Girl From Nowhere’’ 

Friday-Saturday — 

Pauline Frederick 

“SALVAGE” 

ORCHESTRA 

SHOWS 2 TO 11 P. M. DAILY 
Except Sunday 



LOCALS 



Miss Elise Davis of Laurel has with- 
drawn from school much to the regret 
i of her many friends in the college. 



fuiinlfid 



Miss Georgia Helen Denman of 
McComb has entered school here af- 
ter spending the first term of the year 
at Randolph-Macon. 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 



M. M. McGowan returned Sunday 
from a business trip to Dallas, Texas. 
He went out to the “City of the Hour” 
in the interest of the Alpha Theta Chi 
local fraternity. 



Fred Lotterhos went to the Kappa 
Alpha Convention held at Dallas, Tex., 
during the holidays. 



Owing to the convening of the Leg- 
islature on Tuesday, the State Exam- 
ination of Trained Nurses, usually held 
at the Senate Chamber, took place at 
Millsaps College. The examinations 
were held in Dr. Noble’s lecture room 
on Monday and Tuesday. 



Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson. Miss. 

S.P. McRAE 

Can Pit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



Fred McEwen has returned to school 
after his absence on account of Injur- 
ies received during the football season. 
It is doubtful that McEwen will be able 
to play basketball this season; con- 
sequently the team will have a big 
hole to fill. 

I — 

Leo Roberts, Physics Instructor at 

I Texas A. & M. was a visitor on the cam- 
pus recently. Roberts was an M. A. 
graduate of Millsaps in ’21. 



Eugene Ervin of Columbus and of 
the class of ’21, has come to Jackson 
to live. 



Van Cavett of Ole Miss spent the 
holidays at Galloway Hall as the guest 
of his sister, Mrs. Allen Thompson 
matron of Galloway and Burton Halls. 



The basketball team of the Rayville 
(La.) High School will play the Jack- 
son High team in Jackson next Sat- 
urday. One of the players on the vis- 
iting team is a brother of M. I. Honey- 
cutt 




DRM/r 



hero-Cola! 



The Galloway Hall has at last had 
the long-discussed telephone installed. 
The boys can now talk to the ladies as 
much as th°> desire, provided of 
course that the ladies agree to the con- 
versation. 



Prof. Patch went to Chicago to spend 
his Christmas holidays. 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 



A number of the Millsaps students 
j who were in Jackson the latter part 
J of last week enjoyed the presentation 
of “The Merchant of Venice”, on Sat- 
J urday night. The play is said to have 
J. A. HUBER been well rendered. 



Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Eldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



... J , ... 



Miss Margaret Rowsey of Laurel 
has come to Millsaps as a student this 
term. She was at Newcomb last 
term. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE. 



Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A JOO^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 



♦!« — 

CAPITAL NATIONAL 


A 

BANK 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




United States, Hinds County and City Depository 


Capital paid in 

Stockholders’ liabilities 

Surplus earned 

Undivided profits, net 


$200,000.00 

200,000.00 

225,000.00 

25,000.00 


ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 

* ~ — — 


-i 



(t 



BARKER BREAD” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 
THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



ANNOUNCING 

Advance Styles in Cards for the 

Christmas -Tide 

Order Now 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Frank T. Scott 



Charlie Scott C1T y SHOE SHOP 



Elbert Ford of McComb has matric 
ulated in the college. He comes to 
us from L. S. U. 

I 



The Millsaps Masonic Club held a 
business meeting on Wednesday night 
at the Galloway Literary Society Hall 



SCOTT & SCOTT Free shine to MiIIsa P s Students for 

every job of shoe repairing. 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 3Q6 West Capito i S t. Phone 2701 

Capital National Bank Bldg. Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

jackson, miss. M. J. WALTHALL, Prop. 





QUAE FIANT EX HOC COGNOSCES 

Vol. XIV. MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY JAN. 13, 1922 No. 13 



“MISS. COUNTRY GIRL” 
PRESENTED]!) LAMARS 

Parliamentary Drill Incor- 
porated in the Pro- 
gram. 

The usual type of meeting regard- 
less of its interesting speech gets tire- 
some at times without a little humor 
now and then. That being the cas?, 
the declamation of Mr. Mullen was 
thoroughly enjoyed. The inimitable 
manner in which he gave “The Mis- 
sissippi Country Girl” was a treat sel- 
dom enjoyed by the serious minded 
Lamars. 

The most important event of the 
meeting was a motion to create a ten 
minute exercise in parliamentary law, 
to precede the meeting every Friday 
night. The motion met with unani- 
mous approval and it is thought that 
it will be a great step toward a per- 
fectly conducted meeting. This is a 
part of a speaker’s education that has 
sadly been neglected heretofore by a 
majority of the members. The library 
copy of Robert’s Rules of Order will 
probably be in greater demand from 
now on. 

The regular debate was an unusual 
one, the debaters being among the best 
in the society. Though somewhat un- 
prepared they waged their wordy bat- 
tle in a manner that would make the 
Legislature sit up and take notice. 
The question was "Resolved, That wo- 
men should be paid the same as men 
for the same amount of work done.” 
The decision of the judges was ren- 
dered in favor of the affirmative. 

The subject of the impromptu debate 
caused considerable heated discussion, 
it being hard for the Society to make 
up their mind as to whether Mr. Win- 
stead should become a member or not. 
After some lengthy and prolonged dis- 
cussion, it was decided that Mr. Win- 
stead should not become a member of 
the Lamar Literary Society. 



HONOR COUNCILMEN 
ELECTED THIS WEEK 

Two from Student Body and Two from 
Senior Class. 



The Honor Council, which has been 
incomplete in organization thus far 
this year, was increased to full size 
on Tuesday morning. At the chapel 
period the student body was called to 
elect the two members representing the 
whole college. In short order, the stu- 
dents elected A. W. Bailey and M. M. 
McGowan to serve on the council. At 
a meeting of the Senior Class immed- 
iately following chapel on the same 
day, W. N. Ware and H. B. Collins 
were elected to represent that class on 
the Honor Council. 

These elections complete the organi- 
zation of the Honor Council. The rep- 
resentatives of the other classes, 
elected earlier in the session, are: M. 
M. McCall for the Juniors, Miss E. G. 
Sullivan for the Sophomores, and H. 
S. Lewis for the Freshmen. With the 
eouncil recruited to full strength, it 
should be able to do some good work 
in putting a kick into the enforcement 
of the Honor System the rest of the 
year. 



PAW. COUNCIL CON- 
VENES FORJEW PLANS 

New Rules Adopted For 
Electing Editor and 
Manager 

On Thursday, January 5th, the Pur- 
ple and White Literary Council held 
its first meeting of the year, for the 
discussion of some important questions 
of policy and organization. F. J. Lot- 
terhos presided over the meeting, and 
Miss Daley Crawford was elected se> 
retary; in addition to the members of 
the Council, the Purple and White 
staff was present to aid in the delib : r- 
ation. 

The editor-in-chief announced the re 
organization of the staff, with a more 
definite division of the duties of news- 
gathering among the several editors, 
and an assignment of the reporters to 
special departments. He also an- 
nounced the addition to the staff of 
two new reporters, T. M. Davenport 
and Miss Maxine Tull. 

The meeting was then thrown open 
for a general discussion of the policy 
of the paper and suggestions for im 
provements. It was decided to add an 
entirely new feature to the Purple and 
White — a column of news of the high 
schools of the State. This promises to 
(Continued on page 2) 



LOBBY OF GALLOWAY 
GETS FURNITURE 



Thanks to Matron Boys Have Good 
Lounging Room. 



The boys who board at Galloway Hall 
found a most delightful surprise await- 
ing them on their return from their 
holiday trips. What was it? What? 
Surely not! But the evidence was 
right there, and seeing is believing. 

The large living room in Galloway 
Hall had been nicely furnished with ta- 
bles, straight chairs, rockers, settees, 
a Victrola, and a piano. Who did it? 
Well, if it had not been for Mrs. 
Thompson, it would not have been 
done, for she planned it, planned the 
work to get it, and worked the plan. 
Mrs. Thompson says that everybody 
who had anything to do with it at all 
helped, especially the servants who ar- 
ranged the furniture after varnishing 
the floors and getting it in shape for 
its new mission; the Enochs factory 
which furnished some of the articles at 
cost; Mrs. Henry Yerger who loaned 
the piano; and Mr. W. M. Buie who 
contributed one dollar for every dollar 
Mrs. Thompson raised. The money 
was raised by serving dinners to the 
Art Club and to the members of the 
Conference. Mrs. Thompson says she 
plans to give another dinner soon, after 
which she plans to buy a piano. 

The furniture is certainly appre- 
ciated and enjoyed by all the dormi- 
tory dwellers and it adds a great deal 
to the comfort, home like atmosphere, 
and appearance of the dormitory. 
Blessed are those boys whose matron 
plans and acts wisely to promote their 
welfare, contentment, and pleasure. 
Mr3. Thompson, we thank you and the 
others who have contributed to this im- 
provement. 



GALLOWAYS GET IN 

tang™ japs 

First Meeting of the New 
Year is Full of In- 
terest 

The first meeting of the new year 
spoke well for the progress of the Gal- 
loway Literary Society in the future. 
The subject for discussion was the 
Japanese question. I. W. Williams and 
J. L. Maske were on the affirmative. 
While M. S. Watson and M. M. McCall 
opposed them on the negative. The 
affirmative brought out the facts of 
the undesirability of the Jap socially. 
He underbids other labor and lowers 
the standards of living. In California 
one sees the best arguments against 
further Japanese immigration. If it is 
unrestricted, it will be only a mat- 
ter of time until the Japs spread 
and then the conditions will be dup- 
licated all over our nation. For the 
very reason of the cheapness of Japan- 
ese labor the negative advocated a poli- 
cy of non-restriction. Cheapness of 
labor means the utilization of our huge 
undeveloped resources and thus an in- 
crease in production of things. The 
huge extent of our natural resources 
should prevent any unemployment, es- 
pecially if labor necessary for ttzoir de- 
(Continued on page 2) 

Y.W.C.A.PLANS TO 
IMPROVE HUT 



Members are Urged to At- 
tend All Meetings — 
Business Keynote 



Business was the keynote of the reg- 
ular Y. W. C. A. meeting on Thursday. 
Reports on the girls’ adventures Into 
the field of social service during the 
holidays were the order of the day. 
Ways and means whereby the “Y.W.” 
could immediately improve the ap- 
pearance of the Hut were discussed at 
length, but the financial side of every 
undertaking must always be considered 
and money-making schemes were ac- 
cordingly proposed. 

The Vice-President, who presided at 
the meeting, exhorted all the girls to 
be more faithful in attending meetings. 
Out of the eighty girls at Millsaps who 
boast of being members of the Y. W. 
C. A., and who have even paid their 
money into the treasury, probably 
three-fourths of them are habitually 
absent. This is the one co-ed activity 
in which all the girls work together for 
the betterment of themselves, from a 
selfish viewpoint, and for the good of 
the school. It is indeed distressing 
that the burden of trying to maintain 
a Y. W. which will prove a “live wire” 
should rest with the few, when Mill- 
saps has so many, many capable, 
Christian girls who could accomplish 
lots if they only would make a slight 
effort to do so. 

After the devotional chairman had 
read a Psalm, and those present had 
repeated the Lord’s Prayer, the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 



BASKETEERS FIGHT TO 
OVERCOME HANDICAPS 

Lack of Proper Court is 
Coach Freeland’s Main 
Worry 

In spite of the great handicap of 
not having the proper kind of court on 
which to practice, Coach Freeland has 
been putting the basketball squad 
through hard practice this past week. 
Most of the practice has been done on 
our out door court, but several of the 
practices have been held on the city 
Y. M. C. A. court The squad is im- 
proving with each days practice, but 
still is far from being in condition for 
a game. Things will pick up next 
week, however, if the work on the 
“gym” is finished by that time. The 
carpenters have been putting in fast 
work, only stopping for rain. When 
the Majors step into their new “cock- 
pit,” they will begin to show some 
class. 

Coach Freeland has had out on the 
average about four teams. The pros- 
pects are beginning to improve. Cour- 
sey and McCormick are showing that 
“same old stuff” they had last year. 
These two gentlemen with the help of 
Poole and “Half Pint” Coursey will 
most likely hold down the forward 
positions for the Majors. “Breezie” 
Reeves is still sticking to the man he 
is guarding, like Tangle-Foot to a fly. 
He seems to have found a strong run- 
ning mate in Freshman Brooks. 
Brooks is fast, a good passer and a 
hard fighter. From the outlook at 
present he will be the man who will 
help "Breezie” guard the opponents 
goal. The position of center is caus- 
ing the biggest fight on the team. 
Ramsey, Honeycutt, and Hillman are 
fighting it out. There is still a great 
deal of doubt as to the man who will 
finally win. All three of the men are 
tall and have a good reach. They 
pass well and fight hard. This next 
week’s practice will most likely show 
the best man up. 

This year’s schedule has not been 
completed. However, the first games 
will be with Centenary College in our 
"gym.” The student body is backing 
the team to wipe out that football 
defeat by our Louisiana neighbor. 



Program of Lamar Literary 
Society 

January 13, 1922 — 



Declaimed — A. D. Cassity 

Orator V. M . Galloway 



Debate, “Resolved, That Capital Pun- 
ishment should be Abolished in the 
United States." 

Affirmative — H. C. Young, R. E. Sil- 
verstein. 

Negative — E. W. Brooks, O. W. Scott 



Program of Galloway 

Litera ry Society 

January 13, 1922 — 

Declaimer. A. N. Gore 

Orator J. E. Lee 

Debate — Resolved, “That Men and 
Women should Receive equal Pay 
for Equal Work Performed.” 
Affirmative — W. E. McQuaig, E. N. 
Saucier. 

Negative — F. L. Martin, F. A. Cal- 
houn. 



2 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



— — — + 



Don’t Say Drug Store 
Say 

SIMMONS & McGEE 

Your Business Solicited Free Delivery to Campus 



HIGH GRADE CIGARS 



KING ADOLF 
OSMUNDO 
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VAN BIBBER 



DON REMO 
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RED STAR 
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CORR- WILLI AMS TOBACCO CO. 
Distributors 



Made on Honor — Sold on Merit 

EATMORE BREAD 
ACME BAKERY COMPANY 
Jackson Miss. 



Logan Phillips 

108 E. Capitol St. 

Headquarters for HIGH CLASS CLOTHING, 
SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS 
Clothing Made to Measure by Ed. V. Price & Co. 



P. & W. Council Con- 
venes For New Plans 

(Continued from page 1) 



Mississippi’s Best Launderers and Dry Cleaners 

STAR LAUNDRY 

Laundry, Dry Ceaning and Pressing 
Telephone 415 



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I LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING I 
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help get in touch with prospective stu- 
dents for Millsaps and work for the 
growth of the college. 

An amendment to the constitution 
was submitted by the editor-in-chief 
having to do with the selection of the 
editor and business manager. The 
method for two years past has been to 
have these two officers elected by the 
Literary Council, but, as the members 
of the Council are appointed by the 
editor-in-chief, this makes it possible 
for the management to remain in the 
hands of some faction, should an edi- 
tor-in-chief try to take advantage of 
his position. To remove the possibili- 
ty of “politics” in the matter is the 
purpose of the amendment, which was 
passed after some slight changes. As 
amended and passed, it reads as fol- 
lows: 

“1. There shall be an election com- 
mittee consisting of two professors 
and three members of the Literary 

Council not eligible to hold office the 
next year. This committee shall he 
elected by the council early in May of 
each year. No two of the three stu- 
dent committeemen shall be members 
of the same fraternity. 

“2. As soon as possible after the 
election of the committee each year 
the committee shall meet and select 
an Editor-in-Chief and a Business Man- 
ager for the Purple and White for the 
ensuing year.” 

The Purple and White compares fa- 
vorably with any college paper in Mis 
sissippi, and is by far the best for the 
size of the institution which publishes 
it. This standard has been reached 
and maintained only by hard work and 
co-operation; if it is to be kept in the 
future, Millsaps students who have net 
heretofore shown any interest in their 
paper will have to pitch in and do their 
park The present staff is large, but 
it should be larger. There should be 
keen competition for places on the 
staff. More students should try for 
the Clark Essay Medal, given for the 
best news writing. There should be 
more entries for the Short Story Con 
test, which is open to the entire stu- 
dent body, but for which oniy a very 
small number of stories have been sub- 
mitted. 

The staff as reorganized is published 
in the accustomed place at the head of 
the editorial column. 

After a thorough discussion of plans 
for the paper this year, the meeting 
was adjourned. 



«i 

i. 



FE IB ELMAN’S MEN’S WEAR SHOP 

Best Values for College Men 

LOOK AT OUR HATS, NECKWEAR, SHIRTS, 
ETC. OVERCOAT AND SUIT SPECIAL AT ALL 



TIMES. 



413 E. Capitol St. 



Galloways Get in 

Tangle Over Japs 

(Continued from page 1) 

velopment be cheap. The decision 
favored the affirmative. 

The subject of the impromptu debate 
was one affecting practically every 
Millsaps student, (the exception being 
most of the married students). The 
question was — “Resolved: That all 

students who spread Christmas joy 
during the holidays should be married. 
E. N. Saucier and Effie Ballard op- 
posed J. F. Hudson and W. H. Phillips 
in the important discussion. The af 
firmative thought that such a measure 
would be a climax, while the negative 
thought it would be a “killjoy.” How- 
ever, previous to the discussion, one of 
the members had shown his approval 
of the measure by voluntarily going 
through it. The society adjourned to 
i meet the next week. 



Academy Literary So- 
ciety Elects Officers 

The regular meeting of the Prentiss 
Literary Society was held Friday night 
January 6th. This meeting started the 
New Year off with prospects for a suc- 
cessful future. 

A very interesting and heated de- 
bate was rendered. The subject be- 
ing, “Resolved, That an amendment 
should be passed by Congress prohibit- 
ing all labor unions and federations”. 
D. B. Connally and C. O. Watts upheld 
the affirmative, while on the negative 
G. L. Ragsdale and J. L. Kornegay 
gave a very strong argument. On a 
close decision the Judges awarded the 
victory to the affirmative. 

This was followed by a splendid 
declamaiton delivered by W. B. Hook- 
er. The program was concluded by a 
few “smile producers” presented by 
Moody Till. 

After the completion of the program 
the following officers were elected for 
the second term: President, C. R. 
Bush; Vice-President, B. C. Berry; 
Secretary-Treasurer, R. W. Oakey; 
Chaplain, W. H. Wheat; Critic, W. P. 
Wooley; Sergeant at Arms, Gus Meck- 
lin. 

The meeting adjourned to meet 
again on January the thirteenth. 



Ducky: “What is the greatest reign 
in history?” 

Miss Flowers: “Why, that forty day 
and night affair, I guess.” 



Dr. Key: “What kind of swimming 
monster is meant as having been seen 
by the Roman sailors?” 

Mildred B.: “I think it meant Latin 
Sharks.” 



M. I. 0. A. Representative 
Selected 



The faculty met just before the hol- 
idays to select the representative of 
Millsaps in the annual State Oratori- 
cal Contest. Three students presented 
themselves to contest for the honor. 
These were W. N. Ware, M. I. Hunni- 
cutt,~and F. J. LotterhoSi The last 
named was selected by the faculty to 
represent the college. 



MY IDEA OF A LOW-DOWN TRICK 



Two young men — inmates of Burton 
Hal! — have the ill-fortune to own. in 
partnership one pair of Sunday 
“Brogues” and one only. Their 
method of knowing who shall wear 
the pair is the time-honored “flip- 
a-coin.” On a certain Sunday 
afternoon not so long ago both 
made dates with young ladies of 
their choice — that Sunday — each confi- 
dent of his ability to win the “toss”. 
“A” won. then, sure of the use of the 
“Brogues,” passed into a state of coma 
known as “bunk-fatigue”. While "A” 
was dreaming of — who knows what — 
“B” took possession of the shoes and 
WENT. 

I am calling no names — but my feet 
are disgusted with Jackson pavement. 



He — “I had a good joke to tell you 
this evening, but I see you’re in no 
condition to receive it.” 

She— “Why?” 

He — “Because if your face lights up, 
the powder will go off.” — Ex. 



Saved 

“I thought that you were going to 
quit going with that girl because she 
was bow-legged.” 

“Didn’t have to. I took her to a re- 
vival meeting and she reformed.” 

— Exchange. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



FROM BOOKSTORE TO 
CHAPEL 

A ROMANCE— DRAMA PUNKISSI- 
MUS. 



Dramatis Personae — 

Big Ears_ A student (male) 

Bright Eyes A. student (female) 

Brain Enlarger A professor 

Boisterous Eddy A student 

Bashful Emmy. A student 

; Students, professors, and clerk. 

ACT I. 

Scene — In Bookstore. 

(Big Ears and Bright Eyes enter at 
same moment from opposite direc- 
tions).. 

Big Ears — Blessings on thee. Bright 
Eyes. How art thou this A. M.? 

Bright Eyes — Fresh as milk. 

B. E. — Is that a hint? (Turning to 
clerk) Give us two pints of milk. 

B. E. — (Reaching for bottle) Oh, you 
are so extravagant! 

B. E. — No, no. Milk is full of food 
value. Besides, we are Dutching this. 

(Exeunt). 

ACT II. 

Scene — On the walk ten minutes 
| later. 

(B. E. and B. E. are discovered in 
close conversation.) 

B. Eyes — I am very blue today. 

B. Ears — I wish I could change your 
color, but I haven’t a red cent. 

B. E. — (Vigorously) Why not 
change my name instead? 

B. E. — (Determinedly) I will. I love 
you like Camel cigarettes. Will you 
marry me? 

B. E.— Yes. 

B. E. When? 

B. E. — Now. 

(Exeunt). 

ACT III. 

Scene — In Chapel ten minutes later. 

(Professor Brain Enlarger is seen 
industriously leading Chapel. Stu- 
dents and Professors fill the room 
with apparent close attention.) 

Prof. Brain Enlarger — Are there any 
announcements? 

Big E. — (Coming down aisle on arm 
of Boisterous Eddy) Yes, sir. I want 
you to do something for me. 

Bright E. — (In other aisle, leaning 
on Bashful Emmy ) And for me too. 

Prof. B. E. — What is it? 

Both B. E’s — Please marry us. 

(They exchange loving glances, and 
the students in chapel begin to wake 
up.) 

B- E. — Here’s the license. 

B. E. — Here’s the ring. 

B. E. — Will you, etc? 

B. E.— Yes. 

B. E. — Will you, etc? 

B. E. — Yes. 

B. E. — Then the deed is done. You 
are tied. 

(Mr. and Mrs. B. E. return to seats 
and receive congratulations of 
friends.) 

Prof. B. E. — Are there any further 
announcements? No? That will do, 
then. 



(Curtain) 



Don’t trespass on coffee 




grounds. 



Irishman (giving parts of “to skate” 
in Latin) : “Skate, sliperi, falli, bump- 
tus.” 

Prof.: ‘ Failio failure, flunki, suspen- 
dus for you.”— Hillbilly. 



“Since I inherited that property I’ve 
■ had three proposals.” 

“For land’s sake!” — Hillbilly. 



“However, comma,” wrote the tired 
stude on examination. 



Read This 



1. Only character counts. 

2. Keep your mind on the noble and 
splendid things you would like to do. 

3. No man regrets the flight of time 
but him who fails to improve it. 

4. A man seldom loses his temper 
until he has first lost his cause. 

5. Which of the virtues do you con- 
sider the greatest? 

6. Sin is no more attractive than 
Goodness; it is just better advertised. 

— A Searcher. 



A lighting system has been devised 
for highways which makes it possible 
for night automobile drivers to travel 
with headlights dimmed, so brilliantly 
is the roadway lighted. Part of Lin- 
coln highway will be lighted by this 
system. 



The radio message sent by President 
Harding at the opening of the great 
central radio station on Long Island, 
was picked up in over seventeen for- 
eign countries. The station is operat- 
ed by the Radio Corporation of Amer- 
ica. 



JIM’S LETTER 



Millsaps College, 1-13,-22 

Dear Bill, 

What do you think of me writing 
to you on a Friday the thirteenth? 
I am almost afraid to do it — not that 
I am superstitious at all, but I just 
don’t like it very much. But yet, I 
have quite a lot to tell you, and now 
seems the most convenient time, so 
get set for the shock! 

The first thing of importance that 
I have to tell you is that we are at 
present having the old Gym recon- 
structed. Do you remember the night 
there two years ago, when during a 
game of basketball between Millsaps 
and Ole Miss, the seats there in the 
old balcony gave way, frightened the 
co-eds so badly that they grabbed some 
of us around the neck? I never shall 
forget that night, for that was the 
first time that my girl ever showed the 
slightest bit of affection for me. 

Most of the old shack has been torn 
down now, and they are making the 
building much larger, and are making 
side-galleries for spectators that will 
be as good as anyone could want. You 
will probably read all about it in this 
week’s issue of the Purple and White. 
And say, Bill, you ought to drop in 
and give Galloway hall the “once over” 1 
now. Mrs. Thompson, who has charge 
of the dormitories now, is surely a 
wonder. She has managed to make 
sufficient money by giving dinners 
and lunches to various organizations, 
to fit up the big room there on the 
south side of the building in a manner 
fit for the best in the land to lounge 
in. Every evening, after supper, the 
boys gather there and have a big 
time of it. There is a Victrola with 
plenty of good records, and a number 
of those great big leather-bottomed 
arm chairs that seem to invite one to 
have a seat and then get so comfort- 
able as to want to go to sleep without 
moving. 

I tell you one thing, old timer, and 
defy anyone to dispute the statement 
— old Millsaps is growing and progres- 
sing even faster than the city of Jack- 
son, and that is saying a lot. By the 
way, there is a “Local” here that is 
petitioning the Lambda Chi Alpha 
fraternity for a charter, and their pros- 
pects for getting it look mighty good, 
too. Do you remember the wonder- 
ful manner in- which the members of 
that fraternity treated us while we 
were in Baton Rouge three years ago? 

I sincerely hope that they will grant 




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THE ECONOMY OF REAL QUALITY 

You’ll get both in this occasion. Our finest 
qualities in Suits, Overcoats and Furnishings 
are included in this selling. With a very few 
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FOR MEN AND BOYS 

B. KUPPENHEIMER 

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JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 



CORRECT STYLES in FOOTWEAR 

FOR COLLEGE MEN 

BUFKIN SHOE COMPANY 

172 East Capitol Street Jackson, Miss. 



THE DANIEL STUDIO 

The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. 

NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 

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that charter, and enter Millsaps, don’t 
you? 

And say. Bill, you remember what a 
good basketball team they turned out 
here last year, don’t you? Well, I am 
here to say that I believe the team 
this year will be equally as good, if 
not even better. Practice is being 
handicapped by the absence of an in- 
door court, but the officials of the 
Y. M. C. A. are very kindly allowing 
us to use their court whenever possi- 
ble. The members of the team have 
not been picked yet, and I believe that 
Coach Freeland is going to have quite 
a job of it selecting the best men, be- 
cause there are about fifteen first 
class goal-tossers who look well in al- 
most any position that he places them. 

I am not going to say much more 
about basketball prospects now, tho, 
because I would rather wait a while 
until I can “crow” a little bit over 
some victories — ’cause they’re surely 
coming! 

Write me soon, and whenever you 
manage to come to Jackson, be sure 
and come out to the old school and 
look me up. 

Sincerely your friend, 

JIM. 

P. S. — Oh, boy! you ought to see the 
Newcombites who are migrating to 
Millsaps. It’s rumored that almost 
the whole student body will be with 
us here next year! Whoop-la! Hooray 
for the Co-eds! 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

PLEASE YOU 
T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD’S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Md. 



4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription $1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 



STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 

Athletic Editor 

News Editor. 

Co-ed Editor 

Academy Editor- 



-Fred Lotterhos 
Walter Stokes 

Horace Vil'ee 



..Miss Daley Crawford 

M. M. McGowan 

O. B. Triplett 



Exchange Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS— J. W. Sells, E. K. Windham, M. B. Swearingen. 
REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, W. S. Phillips, J. B. Shearer, A. L. Joyner, Leigh 
Watkins, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, T. M. Davenport, R. H. Moore, J. D. Mullen, 
D. F. McNeil, J. S. Barbour, Miss Mildred Brashear, Miss Delta Stephens, Miss. 
Maxine Tull. 



MANAGEMENT 



Business Manager — 

Assistant Business Manager- 
Circulation Manager 



_H. B. ColUns 
_Geo. Whtts 



_G. K. Hebert 



SHOULD THE STUDENTS BE ORGANIZED? 



The student body of Millsaps College is at present unorganized 
and has existed for years in this condition. The time has come, 
however, when a new step should be taken and the students of the 
college should be banded together in an official organization. That 
organization could be called the Millsaps Union. 

The Union would represent for the whole school what the class 
organizations do for the separate classes. It would give some sys- 
tem to the various activities that do concern the entire student group 
and would offer a channel for a business-like management of stu- 
dent affairs. For instance, it would make sure that the election of 
the Millsaps Honor Council should happen at the proper time instead 
of in the middle of the second term. It would present a definite 
organization which should look after all the interests of the students 
as a whole. Important petitions to the faculty would be handled 
through the Union. 

The most important functions of the Union, however, would be 
of a different sort. It would hold meetings from time to time for 
the discussion of student problems and for the decision of student 
questions. At these meetings, the students could get together for 
the improvement of athletics, for the securing of new students, for 
the bettering of moral conditions on the campus, and for action on 
all situations concerning Millsaps. Probably twice a year, also, 
there would be a social gathering in order that all parts of the school 
might be drawn close together. 

The plan is simply that the student body should be organized 
and should have regular officers. A sketch of a suggested constitu- 
tion for the Union is printed elsewhere in the columns of this paper. 

What do you think of the plan? Should the students organize? 
If you think so, discuss the matter with your friends and see what 
they think. 



At some time soon a public meeting will be held in the chapel 
in order that we may find out what you think. Be prepared to have 
an opinion. If you are in favor of such a plan as has been suggested, 
we may be able to adopt it. The Millsaps Union could do no harm, 
and it could do a world of good. 



The work on the basketball gymnasium is progressing very 
rapidly. The old building was a disgrace to the college, but we can 
all be proud of it as it is going to be soon. A glance at the good pro- 
gress that has been made should be sufficient to make every student 
pay up his pledge promptly, if he has not done so before now. 



THE ELECTRIC WOMAN 



If she wants -to be an angel — trans- 
former. 



When she talks too long — inter- 
rupter. 

If her way of thinking is not yours 
— converter. 

If she is willing to come half way 
— meter. 

If she wants to go farther— con- 
ductor. 

If she wants to go still farther — 
dispatcher. 



When she is sulky and will not speak 
— exciter. 

If she gets too excited — controller. 

If she proves your fears are wrong 
— compensator. 

If she goes up in the air — con- 
denser. 

If she wants chocolates — feeder. 

If she sings false — tuner. 

If she is in the country — telegrapher. 
— The Cadet 



THE EMPORIUM 

We are Featuring This Season 

Two-Pants Suits 

— for Young Men 

$ 35.00 

ALWAYS FRESH 

ALWAYS PRESSED 

Young men who like to practice econ- 
omy and at the same time get satis- 
factory service combined with style 
and snap, will be delighted with these 
two- pants suits. 

They meet every requirement of qual- 
ity clothes---ln style---ln fabrlc---ln 
workmanship. 

SOLD WITH OUR SPECIAL GUARANTEE 
OF ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION 





Correct Clothes 
for College Men 

Harris ’ 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Panta zc\ 
Cafe 

• • » 5 

Jackson's Pride 

* /IT j| 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

CLEANLINESS 

T 

WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 

All kinds of 
Sea Foods 
in Season 

Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



Jackson Paper Company 



H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr.’ 



WHOLESALE 



PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE’’ 







THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 



fr- i 




#tratfori) Cloth f*- 



When you see well dressed men 
you Instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

&tratforb Clotfjes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 




«❖ 



-Af ter Every MeaP 

WRIGLEYS 




The Flavor Lasts! 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 

DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 



SUGGESTED PLAN FOR 
MILLSAPS UNION 



The following article is a skeleton 
outline of a plan that has been sug- 
gested for adoption here in order to 
secure unity of effort on the part of 
the whole student body. 

1. This organization shall be called 
the Millsaps Union. 

2. It shall be composed of all stu- 
dents of the college. 

3. The purpose of the Millsaps Un- 
ion shall be to draw its members into 
close fellowship for the promotion of 
everything that has the interest and 
progress of Millsaps College as an ob- 
ject. 

4. The officers of the Union shall 
be a president, a vice-president, a sec- 
retary, and a treasurer. They shall 
be elected by the Union at a meeting 
to be called during the first week of 
May, and shall serve for one year. 

5. The duty of the President shall 
be to preside over all meetings of the 
Union, to call such meetings at his 
discretion or upon the demand in writ- 
ing of twenty-five members, to be of- 
ficial representative of the student 
body, to see that the Union functions 
as it should at all times. 

6. The duty of the vice-president 
shall be to fill the place of the presi- 
dent in his absence or inability. 

7. The duty of the secretary shall 
be to keep a record in a permanent 
book of all meetings and proceedings 
of the Union, and also to preserve cop- 
ies of the constitution of such student 
organizations as the Honor Council, 
the Athletic Association, and the Pur- 
ple and White Literary Council, and 
such other documents as should be in 
the records of the student body. 

8. The duty of the treasurer shall 
be to collect such fees as the Union 
shall assess, to guard the same, and 
to pay out money only upon the or- 
der of the President. 

9. The Union shall hold its meet- 
ings in the Gymnasium or in some 
other place to be selected. 

10. The four officers of the Union 
shall form an Executive Board, which 
shall have in charge the carrying on 
of the affairs of the Union. 

11. The Union shall be expected: to 
arrange a schedule for elections such 
as class elections. Honor Council elec- 
tions, Athletic Association elections: 
to see that these elections take place 
on time; to hold meetings for discus- 
sion of problems and situations of 
general interest to the students and 
for the formation of a closer fellow- 
ship of all Millsaps students; to in- 
terest itself in the securing of new 
students; to interest itself in the bet- 
tering of any undesirable condition 
that might exist on the campus; and, 
in general, to work for the improve- 
ment and uplift of Millsaps College 
and its students 



Another Kicker. 

Marion: “George was the goal of my 
ambitions, but — 

Marian: “But what?” 

Marion: “Father kicked the goal” — 
Sun Dodger 



Seen on English Test 

Five of Shakespeare’s plays are: 
King Liar, A Merchant of Venus, Old 
Fellow, McBath and Omelet. — Ex. 



You can always tell a Senior, he is so 
sedately dressed. 

You can always tell a Junior by the 
way he swells his chest. 

You can always tell a Freshman by 
his timid looks and such. 

You can always tell a Sophomore but 
you can’t tell him much. — Ex. 



h 




The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

. The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



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MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY I 

| Property of Athletic Association g 

Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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millsaps College j 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 

v - ■ ❖ 



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| FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE | 

| Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. j 

I South State Street JACKSON, MISS. I 

i i 

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■ 



6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




INTERCHURCH BASKET 
BULL AT LOCAL T 

Millsaps Students Take a 
Large Part in the 
Games 

The first games of the Interchurch 
Basketball League were played at the 
Jackson Y. M. C. A. Friday night. A 
number of Millsaps men were on the 
teams, and they made a good showing. 
The first game was between the Gallo- 
way Memorial Methodist and First 
Presbyterian Churches. The game was 
close and hard fought, the score being 
25-23 in favor of the Presbyterians. 

The line up was as follows: 
Galloway Mem. 1st Presbyterians 

J. Campbell • S. McNair 

B. Ford W. B. Fowler 

C. O’Ferrall H. Villee 

F. Stuart D. Culley 

R. O’Ferrall F. Wharton 

Martin (Sub). 

The second game of the evening was 
played between Capitol St. Methodist 
& First Christian Churches. The game 
was not so close as the first one, but 
was full of fight, for the Christian 
team — handicapped by the sickness of 
Stovall and Stockett — played hard 
right to the last minute. The good 
team work of the Capitol Street team 
was a feature. 

Here is the line up — 

Capitol St. 1st Christian 

W. Ford A. Jenkins 

E. Funchess G. Davis 

C. Toll E. Starling 

J. Toll C. Daley 

O. Miller G. Britt 

M. Harmon (Sub) 

The referee for both games was J. T. 
Coursey, and the umpire was J. B. 
Harris. McCormick and B. F. Coursey 
were scorers, and Scott and Williams 
kept the time. 



The New Gymnasium 

Very often people become accustom- 
ed to things that they have and the 
things which surround them and which 
they use constantly. To some extent 
this has been true at Millsaps. 

However, someone awoke, a very 
short time ago, to the need for a new 
and larger gymnasium building. Al- 
though this need had been spoken of 
before, every one now appreciates the 
mentioning of it and is more than glad 
that the building is started. 

From all present* appearances the 
new gymnasium is going to be a great 
improvement over the former one. It 
is to be a great deal larger. This will 
it is hoped, enable the crowds which 
attend the Millsaps basketball games 
to see the action of the games instead 
of merely looking at the backs of 
other people’s heads. It will also still 
the fears of some who have been, in 
the past, so afraid of the balcony’s 
falling that they held tightly to any- 
thing substantial within reach all dur- 
ing each game, lest they become dash- 
ed upon the floor at some unexpected 
moment. 

This gymnasium has been long need- 
ed at Millsaps and it will bring new 
joys into the hearts of many of her 
basketball enthusiasts. Besides this 
it will improve the view of which it 
forms a part; that is if its outside ap- 
pearance is taken into consideration, 
and it certainly ought to be. 

A STUDENT. 



Cyclone Hits Millsaps 
Campus 

How many of the Millsaps students 
of today were in Jackson about five 
years ago when the inhabitants of the 
city were startled and dazed one morn- 
ing to find that while they 'slept a si- 
lent power had aroused itself and swept 
down upon the city of Jackson? The 
phenomenon was a thing to fill one 
with awe and wonder, as it swept along 
from the southwest, dipping earthward 
long enough to tear off the roof of the 
Deaf and Dumb Institute; then bound- 
ing onward with ever increasing force 
tearing down houses as if they had 
been made of paper; on across Bailey 
Avenue, the I. C. tracks, the negro sec- 
tion in the north-central part of the 
city, and then sweeping across North 
West Street just south of the Millsaps 
campus; and then twisting and tearing 
through the woods north of Belhaven, 
finally losing itself in the depths of 
the Pearl River swamps. 

It was at just about this time of the 
year, and some of the havoc wrought 
was seen by many of the Millsaps Col- 
lege students when they arose that 
morning. Upon returning after the 
Christmas holidays recently, a similar 
scene greeted the eyes of the students 
of the college today, for the old, ram- 
shackle structure that has been apolo- 
getically called “Our Gym” for the past 
decade, was apparently in ruins. The 
east end of the building was torn out. 
and the side walls were almost razed. 

However, no one (excepting possibly 
a few new students) was the least bit 
alarmed at the appearance of the build- 
ing. On the contrary, there was much 
rejoicing, for it meant that through 
the efforts and contributions of the 
faculty and student body, the regenera- 
tion of the “Gym” had at last begun. 
Since then, workmen have been busily 
engaged with the reconstruction of the 
gymnasium. At the east end, the 
structure has been extended so that it 
is now 84 feet long. Galleries are be- 
ing built on each side for the accom- 
modation of spectators, so that there 
will be ample room for the students 
and their friends to watch games held 
in the future. 

The basketball court is to be 74 feet 
long and 40 feet wide, with an addition- 
al 2 feet behind each goal. These goals 
are to be of the suspended type, and 
will be 5 feet from each end of the 
Gym. A new floor is to be laid over 
the old one, and the completed floor 
will present the best playing surface in 
the State. The work is being pushed 
to completion as rapidly as possible, 
and the building is to be ready for use 
by the end of January. Hurrah for 
the new Gym! 



PATRONIZE 
PURPLE AND WHITE 
ADVERTISERS 



R. H. GREEN 

Wholesale Grocer 

Feed Manufacturer Cold Storage 

Jackson, Miss. 



The University of Georgia has made 
a splendid record in basketball during 
the twelve years in which it has par- 
ticipated in this class of athletic com- 
petition. It has won 61 out of 85 
games played and only 12 of the de- 
feats have been to college quintets. — 
The Red and Black. 



Two local fraternities have recently 
announced themselves at Tulane, the 
Alpha Phi Mu, and the Sigma Rho Tau. 
Both are professional fraternities in 
engineering. — The Tulane Hullabaloo. 



A. & M. LOOKING FORWARD TO 
FAST CAGE BALL TEA^M 



KODAKS 
Books and Fine Stationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a Specialty 

EYRICH & CO. 

Comics, Cartons, Commercial News- 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 
Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



l 



SPALDING FOR SPORT 



“Dog days are here,” said the wein- 
er merchant, as he grasped for anoth- 
er roll. 

"My stars alive!” chirped the as- 
tronomer. 

“I get off here,” said Mrs. Hfen, as 
she laid her morning egg. 

— Red and Black. 



“I’ll be dammed,” said the brook as 
the fat lady fell off the bridge. — Ex. 



Indignant father — “Sir, I’ll have you 
understand that my daughter sprang 
from a line of peers.” 

Resourceful Romeo — “That’s noth- 
ing, I jumped off a dock myself once.” 
— Maroon and White. 



With ten letter men back at A. & M. 
this year, fans have high hopes of a 
championship team in basketball, al- 
though they will tackle the hardest 
schedule on the Aggie records. They 
have a home schedule of approximate- 
ly twelve games with the leading 
Southern teams, and interest this year 
in this sport is expected to “hit the 
top” at Mississippi A. & M. 




Teacher — “What is it that comes in 
like a lion and goes out like a lamb?” 
Bright Boy — “The landlord, When 
father pays the rent.” — The Hillbilly. 



“But why.” asked the city friend, 
“do you allow your son to play in that 
mud?” 

“Sh-h,” replied the mother, “I am 
going to make a politician out of him.” 
— Reflector. 



Wet: "I think that a street car has 
just passed.” 

Sponge: “How do you know?” 

Wet: “I can see its tracks.” — Jester. 



Around This Place 

Oh, a co-ed’s life 
Is a world of strife, 

’Tis a heluva life, quite a pity: 

For imagine it when 
She’s engaged to three men. 

And her fiance comes from the city. 
— Tar Baby. 



He: “You will meet some awful 

nice people when you come to my old 
home town.” 

She: “Oh, I’d rather be with you.” 
— Agonistic. 



When Purchasing Athletic Equipment 
Insist Upon 

“SPALDING’S” 

SATISFACTION IS INEVITABLE 
Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

130 Carondelet St.— New Orleans 
Well! Well! 

Willie: "Mother, my Sunday School 
teacher never takes a bath.” 

Mother: “Why, Willie, who told you 
that?” 

Willie: “She did. She said she nev- 
er did anything in private that she 
wouldn’t do in public.” — Michigan Gar- 
goyle. 



Reflections of a Latin Student 

Latin is a dead language, 

As dead as dead can be. 

It killed all the Romans, 

Now its killing me. — The Hill- 
billy. 



Wised Up a Bit. 

Borrows: “Sorry, old chap, but I am 
looking for a little financial succor, 
again.” 

Bangs: “You’ll have to hunt further. 
I am not the little financial sucker 
I used to be.” — St. Louis Globe-Demo- 
crat. 



The word girl is a synonym for 
trouble to men. Men seem to be 
always looking for trouble. 




THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




HOSIERY 

I stand on a corner on Capitol Street, 
And watch the ladies on their beat. 
Their hosiery, their hosiery! 

With skirts so short and hose so grey, 
They almost take one’s breath away. 
Such hosiery, such hosiery! 

Each pair a dream, each dream a pair. 
May I forever stand and stare. 

At hosiery, at hosiery! 

I scan each pair and strive at last to 
learn, 

Which pair to choose. Gee Whiz! 
Which pair to choose. 



Coed: “I wonder where my head was 
when I said I loved you?” 

Lover: “Why, dearie, on my shoul- 
der.” 



In Freshman Class: “What’s the 

joke?” 

Prof. White: “Well, I have lots of 
them in front of me.” 



Senior: “I smell something burn- 

ing.” 

Soph: “That’s only Dr. Mitchell cus- 
sing his Fresh math class.” 



“This tale isn’t going to be told”, 
said the Freshman as he bucked over 
the chair. 



Prof. Harrell can’t decide under 
which head a course in bootlegging 
would fall — Commercial or Chemical 
Engineering. 



Caesar his Brutus. Napolean his 
Waterloo, and the Flunkee his sum- 
mer school. 



Eczema, Oh Eczema, don’t be so 
rash. 

— 

Soph: “Have you any hose for 

fcym?” 

Fresh Brooks: “What kind of socks 
does Jim wear?” 



All students who have not broken 
their New Year’s resolutions will meet 
in the telephone booth in the dormi- 
tory this evening. 

i 

Prof. Bowen — “Manasseh tried to 
turn back the hands of the clock”. 

Miss Flowers — “I didn’t know they 
had clocks in those days” 

Young Man — “Sir, I cannot live with- 
x»’t vour daughter.” 

Old Man — “Well starve then, I will 
-.not support you always.” 



Prof. Bowen (in Bible) — “The Assyr- 
ians were smitten with a pestilence.” 
!: Freshman Cagle — “What nation was 
: that?” 

Freshman Tabb wants to know what 
.•to 'do with the packages that have “Do 
hot open until Xmas” on them. 



Prof. — “You made ninety-nine on this 
test. Why didn’t you make a hun- 
’dred?” 

Slv — "There must have been a mis- 
print in the' book.” 



Annie fat board in Chem. Class) — 
“Aw.* DootoV, I’m all rattled.” 

Groot — Now, Mr. Applewhite, just 
throw the rattle away.” 



While swallowing spaghetti in a Far- 
ish Street cafe last week, one of our 
most popular students nearly hanged 
himself by getting tangled in the 
meshes of the Italian vegetable. 



I stood on the banks of a brook. 

My senses were almost reeling 
Every once in a while I ventured a 
look, 

For the village bells were peeling. 



Baby — “I want my bottle.” 

Mother — “Keep quiet. You’re just 
like your father.” 



There was a young lady from Siam, 
And she said to her lover named Priam 
“I don’t want to be kissed, 

But if you insist, 

Of course, you are stronger than I am.” 



It Happened Years Ago. 

A little boy climbed up an Anheu- 
ser-Bush and fell down, tearing great 
Schlitz in his pants. He ran home 
to his mother thinking Pabst she 
would Piel them off. Now he is a 
sadder Budweiser boy. — Ex. 



A CHRISTMAS WEDDING 

A boy and a girl sat on the porch 
in the moonlight. Both were quiet, for 
both were thinking. At last the girl 
gave expression to her thoughts. “It’s 
so dull here after one’s been off to 
school. I get real lonesome, John.” 
“Do you like to be lonesome, Mary?” 
The tone was eager. 

“No.” Viciously. 

“Do you like a dull town?” 

“No.” Very viciously. “You’ve got 
something to say, John Ross, why 
don’t you say it?” 

“You don’t have to be lonesome and 
you don’t have to live in a dull town.” 
The boy’s eyes were dancing, but you 
could tell, at least Mary could, that he 
was sincere. 

“How can I help it?” 

“By marrying me.” 

The girl gasped. “What! By mar- 
rying you! Why John Ross!” 

Then followed a long and earnest 
talk on the part of the boy. “And I 
know it will be all right with your 
father and mother,” he concluded. 
“Will you do it?” 

“Y-e-s-s. But what about the 



The fancy display in hosiery on a 
rainy day affects a man’s eyes to such 
an extent that he is always anxious 
to see it clear up. 



As she passed by, she winked at me, 
She closed her pretty eye-lid. 

You want to know what followed? 
Well, then, I’ll tell you. I did! 



One of the largest circuit breakers 
in the world has recently been built 
by an American electrical concern. 
It is rated at 165,000 volts. According 
to Dr. C. P. Steinmetz, the energy 
dissipated when a circuit breaker of 
this size automatically opens on over- 
load, is equal to the energy which 
would be consumed in a head-on col- 
lision between two 125 ton locomotives 
meeting at a speed of 45 miles an 
hour 



preacher?” 

The boy was sure of himself now. 
“I’ll get the preacher all right,” he 
boasted. “Now let’s go see yoor 
folks.” 

The folks were a little dubious at 
first. But as soon as each in their 
turn had argued for the connection, 
ceremony and all, the folks gave in 
and that was settled. 

“But,” said Dad, “Who is going to 
perform the ceremony? Mr. Wilson is 
out of town and he is the only preach- 
er in Ridgewood.” 

“There is Jo Dunglinson.” This 
from John. 

“Isn’t he mighty young?”, ask,ed 
Mother. 

“That’s all right Mrs. Ellison. He is 
a preaqher just the same. I’ll see that 
he is there all right!” And John was 
off to find Jo Dunglinson. 



Fresh: “Have you ever seen a mos 
quito weep?” 

Soph: “No, but I’ve seen a moth 

ball. 



Prof: “Only fools are certain; wise 
men hesitate.” 

Soph: “Are you sure, ’Fessor?” 

Prof: “Yes, I’m certain of it.” 



Bright: “Did your watch stop when 
it fell on the floor?” 

Light: “Why, you fool, did you 

think it went on through?” 



“You say that scar on your head is 
a birthmark. And yet you admit get- 
ting it on a train.” 

“That’s right. I tried to get into 
the wrong berth.” 

— Orange Peel. 



It takes a drug store to make the 
girls blush. 



The newly-weds are not as foolish 
as the nearly-weds. 



Every state in the Union, Alaska, 
Hawaii. Porto Rico, the PhilipDine Is- 
lands and 42 foreign countries are rep- 
resented this year among Harvard’s 
6073 students, according to figures 
made public by the university. 



Wet: “I think that a street car has 
just passed.” 

Sponge: “How you know?” 

Wet: “I can see its tracks.” 

— Jester. 



A grand opera star wants $700 for 
a night she didn’t sing. Must be 
hush money. 



Next you might have seen two hap- 
py youngsters, or, to use more digni- 
fied terms, two very happy young peo- 
ple, skipping about the little town of 
Ridgewood inviting folks to their wed- 
ding on Christmas Day. The town 
was surprised. Were these two gay 
little pieces of humanity going to drop 
out of school and start into the more 
serious business of keeping a house 
and raising a family? It couldn’t be 
possible. The ladies moaned and grew 
angry when their husbands laughed. 
"It’s a shame, the way their parents 
let these children do,” said Mrs. 
McCraw to her husband, Ellis. "I vow 
now, Dixie shouldn’t marry until she’s 
twenty at least.” 

“Pshaw! Let them get married if 
they want to. And — ,” here his tone 
softened, “honey, you were only six 
teen when we were married.” 

And so the talk went on, the wives 
holding that it was “such a pity” and 
the husbands laughing and “pshaw- 
ing” like a bunch of school boys. 

When the time for the ceremony 
came, the house was crowded. In spite 
of what they said the ladies were the’ e 
to see a new slave added to the matri- 
monial lists. 

The house was beautifully decorated, 
the groom was somewhat nervous, and 
the bride was lovely and lovable. The 
preacher looked important and a lit 
tie self-conscious, but all was well 
when the clock struck ten, the hour 
for the ceremony to begin. Everybody 
took his place and waited. 

“****** And now I do 
declare you man and wife,” Jo was 
saying; there was a break in his voice. 
He was evidently nervous. 

“Poor dear,” said Mrs. McCraw, "it’s 



his first wedding.” 

Then come the congratulations and 
requests to be allowed to come to the 
house-warming, invitations for dinner, 
for supper, for parties, talks of show- ^ 
ers and all that chitter chatter of the 
women, while the men joshed the 
blushing bride-groom. 

At last it was time to go and the 
party was just beginning to break up 
when Jo, somewhat embarrassed, rose, 
“Don’t go yet,” and he began to laugh. 

“What’s the matter, Jo?,” someone 
called. 

“Maybe you would like to hear the 
license,” replied Jo.” Here it is. 
Listen — 

Mississippi State Fair Association 
LIAR’S LICENSE 
To all whom it may concern: 

Be it known unto you that John 
Ross is qualified as an A-l liar and is 
able to sling the bull to anybody any- 
where at any time. 

B. Ullslinger, Pres. 

Heza Liar, V-Pres. 

X. Aggerator, Secy. 

And furthermore brethren, be it 
known unto you that I am not vet or- 
dained and am not therefore allow id 
to perform the ceremony pertaining to 
the joining of two persons in matri- 
mony.” 

Then there was war in the camp. 



AN EXTRACT. 

A bosom should remain unseen. 

Hid from the lawless glance; 

No charm there is, so great, I ween, 
Which fancy’d dream cannot 
enhance. 

The scanty robe, and bosom bare. 
Wither the bud of virgin shame. 

The sleeveless arm and forward stare, 
III become the virgin’s name. 

What steals the blush of timid shame, 
Steals the first of beauty’s charms, 

With grace and modesty disclaim. 

Can add no force to beauty’s arms. 

I love to see the maid’s aspire, 

By others arts to please, 

I love the simple neat attire, 
Combining elegance with ease. 

— From one of our contemporaries. 

The Weekly Chronicle, Natchez, Miss. 

Territory, July 13, 1808. 



THE GIRL FOR ME. 



Give me the girl who’s always a sport 

Of whom one hears only good report; 

Who doesn’t paint and who doesn’t 
pet, 

But hikes, and swims, and plays ten- 
nis — you bet; 

Who can talk books, or baseball, avia- 
tion, or art, 

And is interested not in affairs of the 
heart; 

But can enjoy a good play or make 
a camp stew, 

Or sew a fine seam, or steer a canoe. 

Who knows that the Divine Comedy 
is not a play. 

And that the greatness of Rome was 
not built in a day; 

Who can sing, or play bridge, or just 
sit and converse 

On the History of France, or on Ten 
nyson’s verse. 

In short, I want a girl who knows 
what to do 

When off with a crowd, or with just 
one or two; 

Who wags not her tongue as a bell 
does its clapper — 

Deliver me from that thing called a 
FLAPPER. — Emory Wheel. 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Coming To Thfi MAJESTIC Mississippi’s Finest Theatre 

‘THEFODR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE 

Unquestionably the Greatest Motion Picture Ever Created 



99 



ISTRIONE 



The Cozy Theatre 

Monday-Tuesday, Jan. 16-17 
BETTY COMPSON 

— in — 

“At the End of the 
World” 

Wednesday-Thursday, Jan. 18-19 
CONSTANCE BINNEY 

“The Case of Becky” 

Friday-Saturday, Jan. 20-21 
JEWEL CARMEN 

“Nobody” 

ORCHESTRA 



SHOWS 2 TO 11 P. M. DAILY 
Except Sunday 



LOCALS 



Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 

Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING, HEATiNG, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson. Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Styles 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



EAT AT 

JACKSON CAFE 



DRM/C 



IherO'CoIr 



FOR EXPERT 
SHOE REPAIRING 
go to 

J.jA. HUBER 

Watkins, Watkins & Eager 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Pldg. 

JACKSON, MISS. 






Miss Gladys Cagle, a former student 
of Millsaps who has been teaching the 
first part of the session, has returnnd 
to the college. 



Mr. Finger of Ripley is a new stu- 
dent at Millsaps. 



The Bowen Teachers Training Class 
received an invitation last week to 
meet in the future at the Galloway 
Memorial Church. The Class, howeve~, 
at its regular meeting on Sunday morn 
ing decided to continue meeting in the 
lobby of Galloway Hall in order to 
reach the students of the college. 



The Bobashela staff has been busy 
this week winding up the picture tak- 
ing for the annual of 1922. A number 
of group pictures were made on Mon- 
day afternoon. 



The football team was entertained 
Wednesday night at the home of Miss 
Mildred McGowan on Gillespie St. The 
party was a great success as the foot- 
ball men and their girls will attest. 



Dr. Sullivan attended a meeting of 
Laymen at the Capitol Street Church 
on Tuesday. Consequently, he did not 
meet his classes on that day. 



The orchestra will meet on Tuesday 
night for the first rehearsal after 
Christmas. It has been rumored that 
the orchestra can play good music, and 
it is hoped that before long it will 
make a public appearance. 



Where is our next Lyceum number? 



Mr. N. W. Newsom, a special student 
in the Department of Education last 
year, visited the school last week end 
with his wife. 



A number of the students of the 
college attended a social given by th ■? 
Capitol Street League Thursday night. 



The annual contest conducted by the 
Bobashela in order to find the most 
popular student, the best looking stu 
dent, etc. was staged last week. The 
results have not been announced, as 
the staff intends to keep the names of 
the winners a secret until the annual 
is published. 



W. T. Cook has been sick this week, 
and it was expected on Tuesday that 
he would have to undergo an operation. 
His father came to Jackson on account 
of his illness. 



Freshmen Hold Meeting 



A meeting of the Freshman Class 
was called on last Monday by th» presi- 
dent, J. C. Galloway, to discuss the date 
of the Freshman-Junior banquet and 
the adoption of class colors and a claes 
flower. 

A date for the banquet was not de- 
cided upon, but will be determined 
later. 

On the suggestion of “Pat” McNair, 
green and white were adopted as the 
class colors. The significance of the 
green is evident; the white denotes in 
nocence. The carnation was named as 
the class flower upon the suggestion of 
Miss Flowers. 



fiamSei’J 



EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE. 



Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A JOO^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 







‘‘BARKER BREAD” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 






ANNOUNCING 

SPECIAL SALE OF 
BOXED STATIONERY 

CRANE’S LINEN LAWN 
EATON’S HIGHLAND LINEN 
and other Fine Papers 

New Styles in Papers for Men 
Order Now 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Frank T. Scott 



Charlie Scott 



CITY SHOE SHOP 



SCOTT & SCOTT Free shine to Millsaps Students for 

every job of shoe repairing. 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 306 West Capitol St. Phone 2701 



Capital National Bank Bldg. 
JACKSON, W~S. 



Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

M. J. WALTHALL. Prop. 





PAY YOUR GYM PLEDGE PROMPTLY 



PRESENT ENROLLMENT, 302— Men, 212; Girls, 90 



Wl j? ftorplp mb 



Vol. XIV. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. FRIDAY. JAN. 20. 1922 No. 14 



GOSSARD OF Y.M.C.A. LAMARS'RECONSIDER MAJOR QUINTETTE 
VOMAN FAME VISITS COLtEGE MOTION TO OUST - OFF FOR OLE MISS 



Eve is Blamed for Adam’s Brings With Him Message Prominent Freshman Be- Coach Freeland and Nine 
Apple — J. Edgar Lee of Need in Heart of tains Seat In Society Passers Leave 

Speaks Europe of Solon s Today 

One who visited the Galloway meet- Mr. A. C. Gossard, a leader in the Pandemonium broke loose last Fri- The Millsaps five will take the court 
ing last week might have thought at work of the Y. M. C. A. in the South, day night when a motion was made in tonight for the first time this season 
first impression that he was attending was a visitor at Millsaps College on the Lamar Literary Society asking the wben they tackle the “Ole Miss” five 
a suffrage meeting. Woman’s place Tuesday. He conducted the chapel impeachment of Mr. Walter Galloway. a t Oxford. The squad left in fairly 
and man’s superiority drew many devotional exercises and then spoke This motion seems to be the culmina- good shape and expect to put the Uni- 
sparks as future Senators, Governors, to the students about the condition in tion of efforts of a certain faction in versity five under cover, although 
married men, etc., entered into their Europe. Mr. Gossard was a member the society to cause trouble for the they anticipate a hard struggle. 



discussion. But before this heated de- of a party which went through the freshmen, 
bate, “Senator” Gore delivered a decla- countries of Europe last summer on The fir 
mation on the “First Views of the a tour of investigation. to oust sa 

Heavens,” in which he pictured prime- The message that he brings back is j y a fter M 



freshmen. The University has a good team 

The first intimation of an attempt this year and will be hard to beat, 
to oust said freshman was immediate- especially on their own court. The lo- 
ly after Mr. Callins assumed the chair cal squad is not in very best of shape 



val man’s first impressions as he one of great need for spiritual help. ! tQ preside over the ten m j nu te exercise for a game, for they have been terribly 

watched the brilliant sun chariot sink The children and students of the Cen- jn p ar i iame ntary Law. Mr. Mullen, handicapped this season by being 

into the western seas, not knowing tral European section are espe- who ig recognized as one of the leaders without a court on which to practice, 

whether he should ever view its glory cially destitute. Clothing, food, and Qf thg aforesaid faction, made a motion However, the “Big Un” has been doing 

again. Mr. J. Edgar Lee delivered the warm houses are lacking. The con- . ’ his level best to whip the team into 

oration of the evening, depicting in ditions are such that it is hard to ^ ' y shape, and from the manner in which 

eloquent phrases the ideals of America, realize, Mr. Gossard says, that the g ^ ’ they have been passing and shooting 

The speaker reminded his audience of South has cotton to spare and that the Iscusalon an ™ n c a PP ea ® ° a . 6 goals at the last few practices the Ma- 
the many times she has fought for lib- Middle West is burning corn for fuel. * oor . aS , ne '. er , en /!^ n ° r . ! 3r 6 jors will be there with that same ag- 

erty, never lowering her flag, and re- The hard times of America will con- . gressiveness that had the “Ole Miss” 

ceiving for her reward treasures that tinue, he believes, until something is ‘ r a ° w ay ren | a 'L' e per f c ' y five wmrried last year. The University 

pq ni ami ii n pnn po rn on thrmitThmir tno * 



the many times she has fought for lib- Middle West is burning corn for fuel. 

erty, never lowering her flag, and re- The “hard times” of America will con- *'° re * n tbe ^istorj of the society, 
ceiving for her reward treasures that tinue, he believes, until something is ^ r ' Hallow a> remained perfectly 



_ . . . j . . , . .... . .. calm and unconcerned throughout the J ’ 

moth nor rust cannot corrupt. The done to right conditions in the coun- _ quintette has played several minor 

Plymouth Rock was the rock upon tries of the Old World. The greatest whole discussion, in spite of the fact games this year and has been success _ 

(Continued on page 2) need - in tact the onl - v solution, is a that he apparently had no forewarning fu] jn aH except the games w ith the 

' sympathetic treatment so that hatreds °* this action against him. It is be- Memphis Y M. C. A. five; but, since 

■ an mull rn mi iiTft and animosi ties may be swept away, lieved that since he was orator for the thg Memphis .< Y ” has one of the best 

MR JDYNFR WANTS and the Truth of Christ planted in the n ight_ he welcomed the motion in hope teams jn lhe South the two over . 

MORE ’BRLL INP.&W.1 



“shell-shocked” areas of the world. 



Staff Greatly Hurt Over 
His Unkind Criti- 



y.W. PLANS TO 



of a delay of the regular program. 

The motion was passed after a great 
deal of discussion. It was immediately 



whelming defeats at their hands will 
u t aiftvr the University record 
' Coach Freeland is taking nine men 



moved to reconsider the question. wlth hlm . Capt . Coursey> ReeV e 8 , Mc- 
This was the only time that Mr. Gal- Cormick> Brooks> Poole B F Course y, 
loway showed any indications of in- Hillman Ranlsev Corley . 
terest ih the discussion. He arose in 



Party?” We guess, maybe you went 

In an interview granted to a rep- Wednesday night, at least we hope so. 
resentative of the Purple and White The Y.W. is so dreadfully “hard up” 



Have you ever^bSiF to a “Poverty h,s place and looked as if he . wou,d 
irtv?” Wo rn q address the chair; his face showed the 



last Tuesday morning, Mr. A. L. Joy- that something had to be done to start resumed his seat 



nis piace ana loosea as ii ne wouia 

address the chair; his face showed the LAPT\ A Q ("Ii 

strain of the intensity of ihe situation, i n U I U nDUUI 

He was unable to speak, however, and 1 1 kill/ [TIP ITU FT I nil 

resumed his seat. UNIVLnbll Y MAUIA 

The motion for reconsideration was 

passed and then ensued another wordy Most of the larger universities have 
battle. Finallv the vote was taken and erected kuge stadia. Yale is known 
it was found that Mr. Galloway re- the country over because of the Yale 



ner, one of the prominent factors in some coin circulating toward the Hut. The motlon for reconsideration was . ’ ’ „ . ... 

the publishing of the weekly paper of Plans even to the "eats” at the “Pov- passed and then ensl,ed anothe r wordy Jost of the larg8r Ya ® * 3 n ® 

the college, made a few striking sug- erty Party”, were discussed at length batt,e ’ Finally the vote was taken and of thT S 

gestions on ways and means to im- at last Y. W. C. A. meeting. mi n Td\ rmem^sM^by f largT mT '-’l which seats 61.000. This is the 

prove said paper. It is the opinion of Some one suggested the showing of a talnecl ms membership by a large ma- „„ 

the well-known celebrity that the P. moving picture as was done last year, Jorit f- The society then resumed its t tee^ the crowds at 

& W. needs more “bull” in its columns, and arrangements will probably be reguIar program aad arrived at a ® ..f 

This shocking statement was qualified made later. Hamburgers are still be- peac8ful ad iournment. Jhat p ,ans have been drawn for Iddt 

by the assertion that the readers of ing sold on Saturday mornings. Upon being interviewed. Mr. Gallcv jtons ^ thp sea ca wl „ ^ 

the paper care more for sensational The Social Service chairman report- wa F said the statement that he had 

“bunk” than for real, conservative ed boxes and dinners sent to the state kissed Miss X. on the back porch was gr f^ > _f n aFg ^ ' . 

, .. , 14.1 • j j The Harvard stadium is the oldest 

news, such as literary society write- institution for the insane, treats and absolutely unfounded. When ques- _ ...... . . 

„„„ 4,- . ,i . . , . . large stadium in the country and 

ups - trips to town for the orphans; contri- Honed as to whether he had kissed . .. , nftn . , . 

rp, . .. , ,, , * ii u • . , , , originally seated 2o,00u, Out tempo- 

The staff members— all except the butions of baskets to the poor; and her at a11 he said he had no statement ^ stands ive it a ca acit of 

aforesaid resident of Louisiana— have donations to the Salvation Army— all for publication. After being ques- p S n S glVe 1 a ca acl y 0 
been very much wrought up over the during the holidays. “Service for | Honed further he stated that, though ' , ’ . 

unkind statements of their fellow Christ and others” is what the Asso- he had S° od grounds for a libel suit, * nnce °° e sa ,‘ Um „ i ’ 1 „ aP 

scribbler. They feel that the law ciation tries to live up to. he had no intentions of taking the 6 " ' „ a .. Sea 7 ° ’ ' . 

abiding students of this school do not The program opened with a scripture matter to court. hag & jn ghape seatjng 

want anything that is rash, sensation- lesson from Romans 12, and a prayer u . « AAA , 

„i about 6,000 people. 

in'^fn^tii W * c ^| 8d ’ ® ar< - a ®n c * ar interest- by Nellie Clarke. The days subject nCQ AJCD’O 01111 MPII Tha University of Washington sta- 

ZZZ2ZZ tl Min ge T “ PU T e Together ” an appropri - UCDflltn b LUUNUL ilium at Seattle is U-shaped and seats 

paper published on the Millsaps cam- ate one for any organization to con- u 

PU B t in order to t th f der ' Dor °t h >’ CarroH. AUcs Sutton, PR fl PflnFfl The Washington, D. C., Central High 

. in °^ der t0 ^ the true opinion Laura Lee Hollingsworth and Eleanor I HUI U0LU gchool 8tadjum seatg 6 000 

of the students on this matter, the Gene Sullivan reproduced a booklet Last week Prof. Noble called a meet- T , • , 

staff hereby requests that every lr- bearing on the subject. It was shown ing of all Intercollegiate Debaters for pa has a stad j um erec ted in 1915 

regularly matriculated and every reg- how civilization itself is founded upon the purpose of discussing plans for sea j s ^5 qoo ’ 

ularly withdrawn student shall cast this idea of “pulling together;” how forming a Debater’s Council at Mill- IL . Sta . ’ ' . _, . , .. 

... . 6 ’ 6 The University of Chicago’s stadium 

nis vote, lr he be of the persuasion the ability to pull together is a neces- saps. A committee consisting of J. F. , , ,, ,,,,,, , , ... , . 

hi, I,, ” 0 seats 10.000 people and will have to be 

tnat null is not important in his sary asset to any unified, organized Watson. M. B. Swearingen, and E. K. . . . • . . ,, . 

.... „ enlarged to accommodate the crowds 

weemy news carrier, let him cast a body; how selfish interests and mo- Windham was appointed to work out ,,, . , , , ... , ,, 

- m ,n T „ . that demand admittance to the games 

sman peDDie at air. Joyner on the next tives must be cast aside and sacrifices details of organization and present , , , . 

... 4 1 vi m t p p j , . 1 , , • 1 , , as t n g I g m o ra rv si3 u ci s 3rG i u a ci c— 

meeting. 11 of tne opposite opinion, in time and money must be made by same to be acted upon at a later date 

let him hurl a large bowlder. This individuals for the good of the whole by the debaters of this year. ^ Ua . 6 

shall be the manner of voting. group; and, finally, how this idea of The purpose of the organization pro- so that only the most able and best 

Let it not be said that the P. & W. pulling together should be applied to posed is to bring about a better meth- fitted men will be eligible to represent 

should print “bull.” Y. w. C. A. work. od of selecting intercollegiate debaters, Millsaps in the future. 



Last week Prof. Noble called a meet- 



enormous have been the crowds at- 
tracted by the big gridiron contests 
that plans have been drawn for addi- 
itons and the seating capacity will be 
greatly enlarged. 

The Harvard stadium is the oldest 
large stadium in the country and 
originally seated 23,000, but tempo- 
rary stands give it a capacity of 

45.000. 

At Princeton the stadium is U-shap- 
ed with a seating capacity of 42,000. 

The College of the City of New York 
has a stadium circular in shape seating 
about 6,000 people. 

The University of Washington sta- 
dium at Seattle is U-shaped and seats 

60.000. 

The Washington, D. C., Central High 
School stadium seats 6,000. 

Lehigh University at Bethlehem, 



as the temporary stands are inade- 
quate. 





2 



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MAN IS SUPERIOR 

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| Phi Mu Pledges 

Entertain Chapter 



(Continued from page 1) 



+ 



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which the foundations of American civ- 
ilization were founded, and only by 
maintaining the ideals of our Puritan 
Fathers can America continue in her 
matchless course. He closed by men- 
tioning some of the problems before 
America today, discussing especially 
the menace of immigration, and de- 
scribed the era of peace and prosper- 
ity that would come by the right hand- 
ling of these problems. 

The regular debate was over the 

question of whether or not men and 
women should receive equal pay for 
equal services rendered. W. E. Me- j 
Quaig and E. N. Saucier advocated | 
equal pay. They based their stand | 
upon' the fact that such a course was 
only just, that our constitution now 
declares women equal politically with 
men, and that the many successful wo- 
men engaged in many lines of business 
clearly demonstrate woman’s ability 
and fitness. They made the observa- 
tion in their rebuttal that the second 
speaker on the negative spoke from 
the standpoint of a married man. The 
opposers of equal pay were Messrs. F. 
L. Martin and T. Jack Ray. They 
based their stand upon the alleged 
Scriptural teachings of the superiority 
of man over woman and upon the ten- 
dency that such a measure would have 
to destroy home life. The basic princi- 
ple of civilization is the home life. The 
second speaker dwelt at length upon 
the “prime functions of man and wo- 
man.” The judges gave the negative 
the decision. 

A further discussion of man and 
woman followed in th^ impromptu de- 
bate, "Resolved, That we ought not to 
blame Eve because Adam ate the ap- 
ple.” W. N. Ware and J. F. Waites op- 
posed W. S. Phillips and E. W. Brown. 
One of the affirmative gentlemen 
thought that Eve did not know what 
she was doing, while the other did not 
think' it wrong to eat an apple. They 
laid the blame on the devil. The nega- 
tive discussed the beautiful attire of 
Eve, her coquetry, and that of woman 
from Eve on down. Just as Eve fooled 
Adam, so modern Eve attempts to fool 
modern Adam, and the negative sound- 
ed a clarion call for man to realize this 
and assert his just and inherent right 
of rulership. The decision of the so- 
ciety favored the negative side of the 
question and once again, Adam laid 
the blame on Eve. After a few items 
of business, the meeting adjourned. 



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The organization of young ministers 
in college at Millsaps, known as the 
Preachers League, met on Tuesday 
night of last week for the first time 
since the holidays. The meeting was 
in the Y. M. C. A. Hall. Prof. Hud- 
dleston of the Academy was scheduled 
to address the meeting, but he was 
unable to attend. In his stead, G. E. 
Allen, a student in the Academy, pre- 
sented a very interesting discourse. 
1 | R. T. Hollingsworth led in a short 
prayer service. 

Prof. Bowen was present, and made 
the statement that one of his New 
Year’s resolutions was to attend all 
meetings of the League. He suggested 
that the regular meetings be turned 
into a teachers training class, and of- 
fered to lead the class if that plan 
should be adopted. 

The Preachers League is anxious 
that all the student preachers on the 
campus shall become regular attend- 
ants of its meetings. 



For a week the Phi Mu pledges had 
been sending notes, gathering in 
groups in secluded corners and whis- 
pering mysteriously. Every Phi Mu 
was curious to know what was in the 
air, but none dared ask. The result of 
these notes and whisperings was a 
dinner party at which the pledges en- 
tertained the Chapter. It was given 
on the evening of last Saturday from 
six to eight-thirty o’clock at the home 
of Winifred Hines on Gillespie Place. 

The guests began arriving at six 
o’clock. There were “Nine little maids 
all ready to wait. But one got sick and 
there were eight.” These eight, in lit- 
tle white caps and aprons, met the 
guests at the door, and through all the 
evening showered attentions on them, 
showing that though they themselves 
had been treated as only “goats” can 
be treated, yet it was the same old 
story — they loved their tormentors all 
the more for it. 

At six-thirty the maids drew aside 
the curtains to the dining room, in- 
vited the guests in and seated them at 
four small tables decorated with pink 
and white carnations. During the 
dinner, impromptu toasts were given 
by the Phi Mu Chaplain, Mrs Clark, 
and by the president, Nellie Clark. 
Between courses the most secret love 
affairs of the Phi Mu girls were re- 
vealed by the freshmen in various 
jokes and conundrums. How these 
were found out remains yet a mystery. 
Should anyone like to know some of 
these secrets, ask Alice Sutton why 
she so readily accepted the invitation 
or Elizabeth Crisler why she hesitated 
to accept. The hit of the evening whs 
a song written by a pledge to Epsilon 
of Phi Mu and sung by the pledges. 
After dinner there were the brightest 
and happiest songs, expressing the 
spirit of the evening. At eight-thirty 
the guests, after being helped into 
their wraps by the ever attentive 
maids, departed, each wearing a carna- 
tion. 

Then the fun began — a real "waiters’ 
ball.” Salads, cocktails, chicken, soup, 
etc. were elaborately served in half- 
measures. Though some had cracker 
and some had none, all had enough. 
The ball consisted of the Virginia Reel 
danebd sometimes as a solo by Fresh- 
man Swearingen and sometimes by all 
the “goats,” and expert jigging by 
Freshman Smith. All this was done 
to the tune of “Turkey in the Straw,” 
masterfully rendered by the orchestra 
(a fiddle and a piano!). Finally, tired 
and exhausted from serving and danc- 
ing, the waitresses "busted the ball” 
and went home. 

Eight little pledges, happy but tired, 
Had served their superiors, much 
admired. 

Though they (to say it is a sin) 
Hope never to be goats again. 



Football Team Entertained 

The football team was entertained 
last Wednesday evening by Miss Mil- 
dred Macgowan at her home on Gil- 
lespie Street. The party was very en- 
joyable, not only for the football team, 
but for many young ladies who hon- 
ored the party with their presence. 
There were also present Mr. and Mrs. 
Freeland and Mrs. Thompson, who 
have done a great deal for the football 
team since they have been here. The 
party proceeded with much music and 
laughter. The music was furnished by 
some of the talented young ladies. 
Some played bridge, while others en- 
tertained themselves in any way which 
they desired. After a few hands of 
bridge and other games, refreshments 
were served and the boys got the old 
'"''tball spirit once again. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



3 



Progress on the Gym 

Good progress has been, made on the 
work now being done on the gymnas- 
ium. The greater part of the weather- 
boarding has been put up and the 
building is beginning to assume defin- 
ite shape. There is to be a new floor 
laid on the old one, thus making a 
double floor. The rafters on which 
the seats are to be placed have all been 
put up and this part of the work is 
very near completion. There are to 
be swinging goals a tsome distance 
from the walls, thus making a change 
that is a decided improvement. 

The improvement of our gym has 
been made possible by the contribu- 
tions of the students and faculty mem- 
bers in connection with liberal dona- 
tions made by some of the alumni. 
The expense will be about two thou- 
sand dollars. 

It is hoped that the building will 
soon be completed and that the con- 
tributors will early realize much plea- 
sure in the enjoyment of the fruits of 
their contributions. 

BLAZES 



Dogs? Fast dogs? Say boy did I 
ever tell you about my dog Blazes? One 
winter — never mind which — just one 
winter of my many, I was “Out We3t” 
doing a bit of prospecting for the 
muck called gold — camping out where 
the Rockies were my only compan- 
ions — ’cept Blazes. 

Now Blazes was a pup I had raised — 
a dog with not a single redeeming 
quality, save his affection for me; and 
not a worthwhile accomplishment, un- 
less his speed could be called an ac- 
complishment. 

Nearby our cabin — that is to say — a 
matter of five miles across the hills, a 
crew of Italians were grading a right- 
of-way for a railroad spur — and there- 
by hangs the tale. 

Blazes, even as a pup, was fond of 
racing — running races with anything 
which moved — never did I see him 
chase any animal to kill it; he ran 
only to best it in tne race. Cotton- 
tails were his first opponents; he 
chased them as long as they gave him 
a tight race. As he grew older he .grew 
faster; then he chased coyotes; but 
there came a day when these failed “to 
hold him a light.” 

When Blazes was about grown I 
noticed that he began to assume a sad 
and doleful expression — I now know 
that this was caused by his inability 
to find anything which could keep him 
company in a race. It was at this 
period that Blazes and I went to a 
small town in the foothills, through 
which passed a turnpike. Going into 
town we met a small car, known far 
and wide, at the present time, as a 
“road louse” or “Tin-Lizzie.” As it 
sped by us, Blazes pricked up his ears, 
a sign of interest in the dog family. 

The turnpike was also the main 
street in this town of which I speak. 
As I was “swappin’ yarns” with some 
old buddies at the corner drug store, 
where “rattle snake” prescriptions 
could be had, a high-powered automo- 
bile came through the town “hell 
roarin’ ” a§ Cy Whitaker, county 
sheriff, later described its speed. 
Blazes with a yelp of joy dashed in 
pursuit. A short while later Blazes 
returned looking thoroughly disgusted 
and disappointed. Later in the after- 
noon the car passed back through and 
the driver stopped to inquire about 
Blazes and tell of the race. It seemed 
that Blazes soon gained the lead, and 
the driver, determined that no dog 
could pass his car and “get away with 
it,” did his best to run over Blazes, 
“stepping on ’er” to the limit; by his 
sworn statement his speedometer reg- 



istered 72% miles per hour, and Blazes 
had never seemed to really extend him- 
self, and after a couple of mile, had 
stopped and disdainfully let the car 
pass him. 

Blazes and I returned home. Then 
followed a couple of weeks of drooping 
on the part of Blazes, and feverish ef- 
fort on my part to awaken a desire to 
live in the heart of Blazes — for I 
clearly saw by this time that Blazes 
was taking to heart the fact that no 
moving thing of his acquaintance 
could move with him. He seemed to 
take it as a personal affront that the 
Universe could produce nothing to 
“travel with him.” 

Along in January Blazes found an- 
other thing to race. Our cabin was 
near the foot of the slope, and the 
wind would blow down the valley at 
an alarming rate of speed. One morn- 
ing I saw Blazes loping up the valley 
against the wind, and a few minutes 
later a streak of "hair and howl” pass- 
ed me going down the valley, which I 
barely recognized as Blazes. About 
noon Blazes returned, looking more 
down-hearted than ever; he had so far 
outrun the wind that he found himself 
in a dead calm, and had to wait for 
several minutes before the wind over- 
took him. 

From this day on Blazes was on the 
“decline”; he refused to eat regularly; 
became thin, so that his ribs were 
plainly visible at a distance of two 
hundred yards. As the days passed 
Blazes pined more and more — grieving 
for an honorable opponent, and a real 
race. In desperation I took daily 
walks through the mountains with 
Blazes following docilely at my heels, 
I, all the while, trying to find some- 
thing to revive the spirit of Blazes. 

One cold morning in February I 
started out. aimlessly wandering (for 
I had almost given up hope of instill- 
ing in Blazes the desire to live, and the 
more Blazes drooped and pined the 
greater my pride and affection for 
him grew) — Blazes was as usual fol- 
lowing me. He .would make an occa- 
sional dash forward and double back, 
his speed marvelous, the air seemingly 
warmed by the friction of his passing 
through it. These dashes gave him lit- 
tle pleasure, he was only trying to 
show me the futility of life for him. 
My direction soon carried me to where 
the Italians were blazing a right of 
way. The foreman had a large fire 
built, for it was very cold. In an iron 
pan placed on the fire, he would toss 
several sticks of dynamite to thaw out. 

I asked him if it wasn’t dangerous; he 
admitted that dynamite could be ex- 
ploded by extreme heat, but as he had 
been warming it up for many winters 
he never thought of danger. I had for 
the moment forgotten Blazes, until I 
heard murmurs of wonder and admi- 












i 



ration from the Italian workmen — 
“Looka dat doga run,” etc. Blazes had j 
started a playful race with himself \ 
around the dynamite keg, and, growing 
more interested, possibly because of 
the admiring yells of the Italians, he j 
started really running — the air around j 
the keg was rapidly being warmed by ■ 
the friction — soon it was turning blue, 
sizzling hot — Blazes was by this time 
really in earnest — at last he had found 
something to race with! Becoming 
ala’-med I tried to call Blazes to the 
knoll upon which we were standing in 
order to have a good view; in vain was 
my calling — Blazes was now RUN- 
NING. Every third trip around the 
keg he had to jump over himself. 
Finally, alas! the air was heated so hot 



that the dynamite exploded — and 
Blazes — ENDED HIS RACE. 



God enters by a private door into 



every individual. — Emerson. 



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1 The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. | 



NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 



<.]iiimimii:]imiimui[]iiimiiimaiiiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiiimiic]iimiiimit]iiinMiiuiumiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiimuiiiiiiiiiiii(]|iiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiillt]iii!4 



OUR TAILORING WILL 



Interchurch Basketball 
Results 

In the second series of games in the 
City Church Basketball League at the 
Y. M. C. A., January 10, the Second 
Baptist team beat the F'irst Baptist 
team by a score of 49-28. St. Andrews 
walked over the Central Presbyterian 
delegation 18-6. Applewhite played a 
good game with the First Baptist, as 
did Garber and Williams with the 
Second Baptist, and Harris with the 
St. Andrews. 

In the Friday night games, the Gal- 
loway Memorial crew swept their op- 
ponents, the First Christian five, off 
their feet to a 52-10 victory. C. O’Fer- 
rall played a good game for the Meth- 
odists. Each team lost a man from 
the game on account of personal fouls 
— both crowds were playing hard. 
Stovall was back in the game with the 
Christians after being out last week 
because of sickness. The First Presby- 
terian won over the Capitol St. Meth- I 
odist by one point, 20-19. 



Otho Chunn has withdrawn from the 
college, according to the announcement 
of Dr. Watkins. 



T. M. Davenport has been pledged 
by the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity this 
week. 



PLEASE YOU 

T. B. DOXEY 

YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
SOLICITED 



WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
TRADE 

FORD S DRUG STORE 
Capitol and Mill Sts. 

FOR YOUR— 

Cigars Tobacco Cold 
Drinks — 

MITCHELL & DIXON 

Telephone 1117 

R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS — FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
Baltimore, Md. 



4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 



One Subscription — $1.25 

Additional Subscription .. 1.00 



Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909. at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of eacn 
Monday. 



STAFF 



Editor -in-Ohief._. 
Athletic Editor— 

. News Editor 

Co-ed Editor 

Academy Editor. 
Exchange Editor. 



Fred Lotterhos 

Walter Stokes 



Miss Daley Crawford 

M. M. McGowan 

O. B. Triplett 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS — J. W. Sells, E. K. Windham, M. B. Swearingen. 
REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, W. S. Phillips, J. B. Shearer, A. L. Joyner, Leigh i 
Watkins, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, T. M. Davenport, R. H. Moore, J. D. Mullen. 
D. F. McNeil, J. S. Barbour, Miss Mildred Brashear. Miss Delta Stephens, Miss. 
Maxine Tull. 



MANAGEMENT 

Business Manager H. B. Collins 

Assistant Business Manager Geo. Watts 

Circulation Manager _G. K. Hebert 



COLLEGE MEN AND THEIE MONEY 



Shakespeare made one of his characters say : 

"While I play the good husband at home, my son and 
my servant spend all at the university.” 



THE EMPORIUM 

We are Featuring This Season 

Two-Pants Suits 




-for Young Men 



at 



$35.00 

ALWAYS FRESH 

ALWAYS PRESSED 

Young men who like to practice econ- 
omy and at the same time get satis- 
factory service combined with style 
and snap, will be delighted with these 
two-pants suits. 

They meet every requirement of qual- 
ity clothes---in style-- - in fabrlc---in 
workmanship. 



SOLD WITH OUR SPECIAL GUARANTEE 
OF ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION 



The statement sounds very much like some that are heard today 
in homes that are maintaining representatives at college. The com- ; 
mon currency of this idea of the college man and his great money- 1 
spending ability calls for some comment on the situation. 

The college man does spend a great deal of money; but it takes j 
a number of dollars to support life — whether in college or out. If he 
were out of college, he would probably be spending even more money I 
than he spends while in school. It is not the amount of the money 
that makes the college man’s expenditures seem exorbitant. It is 
the fact that he usually is spending what he did not earn. 

The parents of the student pay the bills, and they are glad to j 
do so, as long as the boy is holding up his end of the agreement — 
that is, doing his school work. What hurts the man who is paying 
is for the son to fail to show proper gratitude by conscientious ef- 
forts and by careful watching of the purse strings. The money that 
goes for school expenses — campus activities, books, board, etc. — does 
not worry the pare-nts. It is what goes for trifling, extra-campus ! 
pleasures and frolics that cause their regrets. 

The men who pay their own expenses in college realize the value 




Pantaze 

Cafe 

Jackson’s Pride 
QUALITY 

SERVICE 

CLEANLINESS 

WE SERVE THE BEST 
THE MARKET AFFORDS 



of money; and they may be trusted to keep their budgets within 
proper bounds. Those who are receiving their money from home 
should learn the same lesson. 



Correct Clothes 
for College Men 



JACKSON’S ATHLETIC FIELD 



All kinds of 
Sea Foods 
in Season 



The business men of Jackson have completed plans for a modern 
and adequate athletic field to be constructed in the city within the 
next few months. The prime purpose of the field is, of course, 
for league baseball games in the summer. But the field will be used 



Harris ’ 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



also for school and college games. Millsaps College will reap great 
advantages from the new project in that her teams — football especial- 
ly — will have a better place to play than at present. 

Until the college athletic field can be enlarged, some day, to ac- 
commodate intercollegiate games, the college will continue to thank 
the City of Jackson for the use of its equipment. 

THE BELHAVEN MISS 

The Frrple and White is delighted to welcome the Belhaven 
Miss among its exchanges. The Belhaven Miss is the new paper to 
be issued each week by the students of the college across State Street. 
We wish for the staff of the new paper every success. 

Someone has said: ‘‘All the young men think the old men are 

fools; all the old men know the young men are fools.” 



I Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL. Pies, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

PAPER. PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS, 
TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 106 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

"MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE" 

, = - - - 






THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



5 



MM 

ir 1 






k n i 



#!raJfori) Clothe 

[ When you see well dressed men 
| you instinctively think of Strat- ; 
j ford, because these clothes are | 
| famed for setting the styles, j 
I Our new Fall and Winter dis- [ 
play of 

^tratforb Clotfjes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
j inspection. 

Come now while the assortments : 
are complete. 



DUKE & LASETER 

MEN’S WEAR 

Jackson, Miss. 



■ ■iMi-iia ■ M I | . | ■ 

uyr 

WRIGLEYS 



Newest 

Creation 










Peppermint fla- 
vored chewing gum c 
with Peppermint v 



-A / 



\ ■ A 



Sugar Coating. 

Sugar jacket 
“melts in your . 
mouth,” leaving f 
the deliciously a 
flavored gum I 
center to aid I 
digestion, \ 
brighten teeth \ 
and soothe \ 
mouth and throat. 



SEND US YOUR SWEATERS TO BE 
DRY CLEANED 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

J. P. JONES 
Room 25 — Galloway Hall 
Representative 



DR. E. H. GALLOWAY 

Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 

JACKSON, MISS 



MANNERS 

It has always been more or less true 
that a nationality is distinguished by 
its manners. “When in Rome, do as 
the Romans do” is an ancient phrase 
tvhich is still in use — a phrase which 
has “worked.” 

The Frenchman shrugs his shoulders, 
gesticulates wildly, and kisses a com- 
rade on both cheeks; hut did you ever 
see an Englishman indulge in any 
exaggerated manners? Why, no. In- 
stead, he is brusque, and possesses all 
the staid dignity which the college 
freshman lacks. The German has that 
methodical, military manner which 
breaths of his training for such a life. 
The American citizen is known for his 
independent, “happy-go-lucky” man- 
ner, and his ease In any situation. He 
slaps his fellow on the hack and calls 
him by name — hut when he meets a 
j lady his hat is raised— (or ought to 
1 be.) 

In anti-bellum days, courteous, fine 
j manners were a prominent charac- 
teristic of the Old South. We are 
proud when we recall the high regard 
in which “the lady fair” was held by 
the courtly gentleman, who called her 
“Miss Betty” and stood ready to wait 
upon her. He never failed to raise his 
hat to her or to assist her in and out 
of her carriage. 

In recent years there seems to have 
j been a considerable decline in the high 
} standard of manners, formerly upheld 
1 by our grandparents. Those other 
1 days are gone; we do not want the 
Wheel of Time to reverse its order of 
revolution and return them to us. 

| However, the younger generation in 
America today could profit much by 
imitating those customs and manners 
J of a past era. 

Now, the girls and young men alike 
seem to lack consideration for others, 
to lack a desire for the use of pure 
reverent language, to lack respect for 
all authority. This is not universally 
true, but is the situation in a majority 
of cases. Those to whom this does not 
;. apply, are often called “old fashioned,” 
and sometimes have to forfeit a good 
time because of their stand. Women 
are frequently laughed at on account 
of their pride. Some pride is foolish, 
and too much of it is dangerous; how- 
ever, every woman who aspires to be 
considered refined and cultured must 
boast of pride enough to see that her 
lovely, gracious manners will brand 
her as such. 

It seems to us to be the height of 
impoliteness w T hen a young man neg- 
lects to raise his hat on meeting a 
young lady. Yet, we regret to say. 
there are students at Millsaps College 
who fail just there. It costs nothing 
hut a tiny hit of trouble — and to the 
girl who recognizes goods manners, it’s 
worth the trouble. 

The Co.-eds are supposed to support 
the institution on every hand, and you 
bet we want to do it. We are expected 
to be present at all meetings, day or 
night, in which we have a part. The 
young men do not call for us nor escort 
us home. Why is it? Surely some of 
our most influential students are not 
lacking in good manners? It must he j 
! thoughtlessness. Whatever it be, it is 
j very noticeable. 

Men and women today are judged to 
j a great extent by the way in which they 
i conduct themselves in “polite society.” 

A premium is put on good manners — , 
but where are they? Some of the girls 
are just as much to he questioned as 
j the men; for they too, are to blame. 

Remember: “A person is known by 

the manners he has.” Let’s all try to 
make this year the beginning of an- j 
other age of chivalry, of respect and j 
regard for one another. We could then j 
all be much better friends. Don’t you j 
1 think so? A CO.-ED. ; 



f 



SMART CLOTHES 



FOR 



YOUNG MEN 



MADE BY HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 



They’re finely tailored by hand in the 
finest all-wool fabrics — exclusive pat- 
terns and NEW Styles. Satisfaction 
or money back. A hearty welcome 
awaits you at — 



"Jackson’s Best Store” 

IvENNINGTON’S 

WALK-OVER AND HANAN SHOES 



H* T. Cottam & Company 

(Incorporated) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS— FRUITS & PRODUCE 
JACKSON, MISS. 



The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 

•>iiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiMiiiiC]iiiiiiiiniic:iiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiic]iuiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiMiiiiiiDiiiiiiiMiiiniHiiiiiiiii[]iiiiMiiiiiic^ 

MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 
Property of Athletic Association 
Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

^]iiiiiuiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiciiimniiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiit]iiii$ 

MLLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.S. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

. J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



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1 FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE | 

j Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 1 



I South State Street 



JACKSON, MISS. 1 



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*71 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



(> 




It is said that woman was made ^ 
from a rib taken from man — probably 
so — others say she has been a pain in < 
his side ever since. 



OLDEST CITIZEN. 



Sells — “When a man’s married he 
sees his mistake.” 

McCormick — “Yes, he sees her every 
day.” 



This spring weather has its effect. 
Now look at the swing on Dr. Watkins 
porch. 



Modern worship is divided between 
the golden calf and the silken calf. 

—Ex. 



PATRONIZE 
PURPLE AND WHITE 



The latest report is that the oldest 
living person — a negress — has been lo- 
cated in Kentucky. The following con 
versation between her and a New 
York Times reporter will give an idea 

of her age, or ? 

“Auntie, I understand you are the 
oldest person for miles around.” 

“Yas, sah, I ges I is — all des white 
folks says dat.” 

“Do you know your age?” 

“Do I? Dar ain’t no body kin tell 
you dat — Marse George who done got 
kilt in de wah — yo’ know de odder wah 
— he done eben forget de count fore he 
died.” 

“Then, you remember the Civil 
War?” 

"’Course I does chile, why de bullets 
wuz failin’ ’round me jes’ lak de hail.” 
“The Revolutionary War, Auntie, do 
you remember it?” 

“I shore does, it seems jes’ lak it wuz 
las’ week — dem wuz de wust times.” 
“Well, how about the fall of the 
Roman Empire, can you recall that?” 
“Lemme see, seem lak I does — any 
how I ’member hearin’ de white folks 
say sumpin done drapt.” 



Wilson, arriving at checker board 
where four are seated — “Which two 
are partners?” 



King: “Who said there was only 

one “bel” in Belhaven?” 

Queen: “Probably the same one who 

said there was only one “sap” in Mill- 
saps.” 



HOW THE VOTES WERE CAST. 



1. What is Millsaps greatest need? 
More Co-Eds. 

2. Which professor shoots the most 
bull? (Ducky not eligible). All usu- 
ally. 

3. Was Hollingsworth here when 
the Century started (showing old 
shows) ? Undecided. 

4. Who is the prettiest girl, (only 
girls can vote for this). Each girl got 
one vote. 

5. Who is the best all-round man? 
Ball. 

6. What color dress do you prefer? 
Transparent. 

7. What is your idea of a universal 
man? Ford. 

8. Who is the heaviest man? 
Waits. 

9. What does the Legislature do? 
Spend money. 

10. What is your favorite sport? 
The one with the biggest car. 



A great many swell affairs have a 
bad ending — look at the recent Zep- 
pelin accident. 



SAY IT WITH EGGS. 

We wonder if there is any reason 
why the orchestra had their picture 
taken before their public appearance? 



The times are out of joint, 
O. cursed spite — 

My Saturday Evening Post 
Comes on Thursday night. 



The Editor wants someone to in- 
terpret the Latin under the heading of 
the paper. 



Dr. Watkins — “What degrees are you 
after young man?” 

Watson — “Well I can’t decide be- 
| tween the B.V.D. and the R.F.D.” 

Nelson — “Speaking of famous places, 
I have bathed in the famous Hot 
Springs in Arkansas.” 

Dad Tumlin — “That's nothing, I 
bathed in the spring of 1904.” 



Debutante — A young girl who has 
succeeded in coming out, as can be 
told by her new gowns. 



The two men who attempted to rob 
the window of Bourgeois’ about eleven 
a. m. last Tuesday are evidently con- 
vinced by now that highway robbery 
in the daytime is not as productive as 
it is thrilling. This occurrence proves 
that all fools are not dead yet. 
— 

Hudson: “What show did you go to 

this evening?” 

Ballard: “I believe it was 'The 

Matinee.’ ” 



Sabin# says: “If you meet the re- 

ceiving line coming in, you must meet 
the deceiving line going out.” 



A BIRD'S EYE VIEW. 

Jim — “Here’s a snapshot of my girl 
at the beach.” 

Jam — “Snapshot! Boy, I’d call that 
an exposure.” — Davidsonian. 

— 

FOOLED AGAIN. 

A freshman saw an ad reading: 
“Send 10c for a handsome engraved 
picture of George Washington.” So he 
bit and received a two-cent postage | 
stamp. — Davidsonian. 



AINT I DE ORFUL GUY? 

The girls' are crazy ’bout me, 

I cannot tell you why; 

They’re simply wild about me. 
Aint I de orful guy? 

I aint so very handsome. 

An’ I sure am awful shy. 

But still somehow they love me, 
Aint I de orful guy? 

I aint no fancy dancer. 

An’ flirt, I can’t, oh my; 

But yet they’re wild about me, 
Aint I de orful guy? 

I’ve never been a “jelly,” 

But there’s no cause to sigh, 

Since the girls are wild about me, 
Aint I de orful guy? 

But men I go to Millsaps 
So I guess you know that’s why 

The girls are wild about me, 

Aint I de orful guy? 



LOOKING PLEASANT. 

“We cannot, of course, all be handsome 

And it’s hard for us all to be good; 

We are sure now and then to be lone- 
some. 

And we don’t always do as we should. 

To be patient is not always easy; 

To be cheerful is much harder still; 

But at least we can always look pleas- 
ant, 

If we make up our minds that we 
will.” —Selected. 



ADVERTISERS 



R. H. GREEN 

Wholesale Grocer 

Feed Manufacturer ( old storage 

Jackson, M iss. 



EXCHANGES 



KANGAROO MAT PROSPECTS 
BRIGHT. 

With Bookout, the world’s middle- ( 
weight champion on the mat, to coach 
them, Austin College has bright pros- 
pects of a wrestling team worthy of i 
the Kangaroo name. There are sev- 
eral experienced wrestlers in the school 
and with Coach Bookout to direct 
them, there is no reason why* they 
should not win the state championship 
this year.— The Kangaroo. 



hODAKS 

Books and Fine Mationery 
Kodak Film Developing 
a ‘-•pecialty 

EYHiCIl & CO. 




Comics, Cartons, Commercial News 
paper and Magazine Illustrating. Pas- 
tel Crayon Portraits and Fashions. By 
Mail or Local Classes. Write for 
terms and list of successful students. 

Associated Art Studios 
X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 



SPALDING FOR SPORT 



OLD MISS TO HAVE NEW PHAR- 
MACY-CHEMISTRY BUILDING. 

The foundation for the new Phar- 
macy-Chemistry building at Ole Miss 
has been laid and its completion is ex- 
pected by the month of May. It is to 
be built of marble and concrete and 
the approximate cost will be 8175,000. 
— Mississippian. 



One of the dreams of the University 
of Florida’s football team has been 
realized in obtaining a game with 
Harvard on their 1922 schedule, which ; 
will be played November 4. — The Flor- 
ida Alligator. 



NEW INSTRUCTORS AT U. OF GA. 

Four additions to the faculty of the 
University of Georgia have been made 
since the first of January. The addi- 
tions include instructors in Romance 
Languages, Journalism and Mathe- 
matics. 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA HAS 
GOOD DEBATING RECORD 

Records show that the debating j 
teams of the Red and Black have won 
from twenty-two of the thirty-four 
teams they have faced since Georgia j 
first put a debating team in the field ; 
of competition in 1901. During the j 
past two years she has been undefeat- j 
ed. The only institution to get the bet- 
ter of Georgia during this twenty year 
period is the University of North Caro- 
lina, which has won six out of ten de- 
cisions. 



You tell’em flooring — you support 
the family. — Ex. 




When Purchasing Athletic Equipment 
Insist Upon 

“SPALDING’S” 

SATISFACTION IS INEVITABLE 
Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

130 Carondelet St. — New Orleans 



Harry: "Do you mind if I smoke?” 

Harriet: “Well, you know how I 

hate the taste of tobacco.” — Mississip- 
pian. 

FAG FIEND 

Soph — “Which is correct, a herd of 
camels or a drove of camels?” 

Fresh — "I thought they always came 
in packs.” — Davidsonian. 



PROPINQUITY. 

He stood by her. 

She stood by him; 

His arm was long, 

Her waist was slim; 

You guess of course. 

What happened then 

(Girls will be girls, 

Men will be men). 

Since love is sweet. 

And life is young; 

What wonder they 
Together clung. 

And yet we hate to mar — 
They clung to straps 
In a crowded car. 

— Selected. 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 



CHRISTMAS VACATION 
IN THE OLD DOMINION 

(By. M. M. Black, Jr.) 

The scene of departure was at Mor- 
ris-Harvey College, Barboursville, W. 
Va. At twelve-thirty, just after the 
midday meal, all the students were dis- 



mining camp is a unit to itself — it has [ 
its own electricity, water works and 
other conveniences common to us of 
the present day. As we passed one of 
I the mines I saw the little electric 
i motor called the “Trip,” pulling several 
| cars laden with coal from out that 
yawning black hole in the side of the 

, , | mountain and watched the cars as 

missed for the Christmas holidays. ,, , . , 

, * they went slowly down the slope to be 

With whoops and yells and other man- .. , . , , ., 

„ 1 emptied into the much larger railway 

ifestations of supreme satisfaction add- 

» cars which were to transport the coal 
ed to those of sublime joy, they cavort- 

, . . .. , .. , to all parts of our country. 

.ed about the campus and awaited eag- 

, ,, . . . .. . .. . . Between Fort Gray and Williamson, 

erly the bus to take them to the train. 

„ . I W. Va., we passed through eight tun- 

Some went one way, some another: I , • , . . , 

nels, short, it is true, but nevertheless 



others went both ways. Our crowd of 
about fifteen climbed in the ’bus we 
had hired for the purpose and were 
soon on our way to Kenova. Our drive 
over the excellent paved road between 
Barboursville and Kenova was indeed a 
pleasant one; for not only was the 
scenery on all sides of us beautiful 
to behold, but also our crowd was fill- 
ed with mirth and jollity. Quips and 



proving to us how difficult it must 
have been to build a railroad where 
solid rock had to be encountered at 
such frequent intervals. Our entire 
journey was that of twisting, turning, 
and winding in and out among the 
hills, whose peculiar slopes interested 
us no little. As we traveled through 
Mingo County, which now bears the 



cranks and wanton wiles as we rode ! name of “Bloody Mingo,” I must con- 



for miles and miles. After a short 
wait in Kenova we boarded th^Norfolk 
and Western train, obtained seats, and 
in ten minutes the train left the sta- 
tion. At Kenova is a bridge a mile in 



fess that I felt somewhat uneasy and 
rather nervous. It was in Mingo, you 
may recall, that the recent mining 
trouble occurred, and through each 
town that we passed we saw several of 



length extending across the Ohio river, the statq police armed and eyeing care- 
and the trains, which pass frequently, J fully every passenger who descended or 
make a deafening roar as they go over ' ascended the steps of our coach. But 
it. We noted this particularly because my fears were groundless, for we even 
the place for boarding trains is about came through Welch without molesta- 
in the center of this bridge. From | tion, and as darkness had then pre- 
there one can look out upon three vented our seeing more on the outside, 
states, Kentucky, Ohio and West Vir- we settled ourselves as comfortably as 
ginia, and the name “Kenova” is de- possible and were content to peer into 
rived thereby. our own thoughts. 

Since our party had been fortunate In a little while we three grew tired 
enough to get seats near together we | of talking and were glad to relieve the 
were again able to resume our merri- monotony by playing Rook. Our game 
ment uninterrupted. We should not I was a three-handed one until we met 
fail to mention the fact that in this 1 an agreeable and pleasant young man 
crowd of young ladies and gentlemen [ who then joined us in the game and 
there were three of the professors of enabled us to play with two on a side 
Morris-Harvey College, who, of course as partners. We sat up until about 



added to the enjoyment of the com- 
pany by their frequent and nonpareil 
witticisms. I mention this because I, 
myself, was one of those professors, 
and I observed with interest the coun- 
terfeited glee of the students who ac- 
companied us. Such a noted group as 
we were — I, the Preparatory English 
teacher; Mr. Pangle, the Greek teach- 
er; and Mr. Blackwell, the Science 
teacher of the college. 



12 o’clock playing together, and as our 
friend left the train soon after, we 
played no more Rook during the jour- 
ney. After refreshing ourselves with 
a portion of the food which we had 
brought with us, -we vainly attempted 
to sleep, but succeeded only in tossing 
fitfully about. At Roanoke, in some 
dead hour in the morning, a crowd of 
V. P. I. boys boarded the train and you 
may rest assured that there was no 



We enjoyed the company of our dear I chance at all of rest, had there been 
pupils, especially that of the young ! any before. They immediately swept 



ladies, until dark, when all of them had 
gotten off, and only we three distin- 
guished (from what?) professors were 
left to continue the journey. Along the 
route, we noted many things of inter- 
est — at least they were especially in- 
teresting to me as I had never been 
through that part of the country be- 
fore — and spent much time in gazing 
out of the window or discussing the ob- 
jects we saw outside. Our journey was 
along the Big Sandy River for a great 
part of the time, and on all sides of us 
the rocky-clad hills rose higher and 
higher as we rode on. In some places 
we noted huge bowlders perched pre- 
cariously on the sides of the hills, and. 
ofttimes we were right up against solid 
walls of rock, whose faultings and fold 
ings were plainly discernible to th? 
eye. Not long after we had left Kenova 
we could also plainly see layers of 
coal running through the walls of rock 
on the sides of us, and in some places 
the coal had been washed down alone 
and was there clearly visible to us. The 
section of West Virginia through 
which we passed is literally filled with 
numerous coal mines, and practically 
every town along the way is devoted to 
coal mining. I noticed carefully the 
miners’ tents scattered here and there, 
and in some places, the neat little cot- 
tages provided for their comfort. A 



through the coaches like a forest fire, 
and before long the coach resounded 
with their yells and college songs to 
the accompaniment of guitars and 
mandolins. Some little while later a 
few young ladies ogt on the train, and 
the cry that arose was as that of vic- 
tors returning from battle with the 
spoils of their labors in the field We 
enjoyed watching them in their bois- 
terousness and soon had lost all desire 
for sleep. At 4:15 a. m., we reached 
Lynchburg where Mr. Pangle left us to 
change cars for his home in North 
Carolina, and again our train was 
boarded by more boys from V. P. I. 
with their crisp-cut grey uniforms over 
which were draped the cardinal capes 
turned wrong-side out at the shoulders. 
Now it was that Blackwell and I were 
left to continue the journey, not alone, 
but with those whom we knew not. 

Our intentions had been, on leaving 
Kenova, to stop at Petersburg, Va., but 
when we arrived there, we decided to 
continue the journey to Norfolk. At 
8:30 that same morning we reached 
there, and alighting from the train, 
were struck by a severe and chilling 
blast of wind, which nearly took us off 
our feet. As we entered the Union 
depot, I was astonished at the beauty 
of the building and spent several min- 
utes in gazing at the tall marble col- 



umns inside and the beautiful walls 
and floor. We were soon up in the 
business section of the city and noticed 
the hurry and bustle of everyone on 
the streets; for it was just before 
Christmas and all seemed to be filled 
with the enthusiasm so common at 
that season of the year. After a | 
hearty breakfast, we walked up and 
down the main business street there 
observing the buildings and watching 
the crowds until we entered a certain 
office building and found an uncle of 
Blackwell’s. He seemed pleased to see 
us and invited us to lunch. After 
lunch we were taken out to his home 
in West Norfolk and there spent the 
night. The next morning we arose, at- 
tired ourselves to face the biting wind, 
and returning to the Union depot, took 
the electric line for Cape Henry and 
Virginia Beach. It was then that I had 
my first glimpse of the Atlantic, and 
at Cape Henry I saw the huge guns 
which our government is putting up as 
a part of Fort Storey. This fort is to 
be one of the most important ones in 1 
our country, and seven million dollars 
has been appropriated for its erection. 

I was interested to note the huge sand 
dunes there at Cape Henry, those that 
extend for miles along the coast just 
at that point. We returned to the city 
soon after and spent the rest of the 
time riding about in a Chandler be- 
longing to Blackwell’s uncle. We were 
thus enabled to see much of Norfolk, 
the beautiful residences, the excellent , 
high school building, and other places i 
of interest to a stranger in the city. I 
shall always remember how hospitably 
I was treated at the home of Black- 
well’s uncle, Dr. Doyle, and truly I 
learned that the hospitality of the 
I Virginia people cannot be praised too 
highly. We left Norfolk Friday after- i 
noon at 4:15 and reached Petersburg j 
two hours later. At that particular ; 
time, I was not able to see much of ; 
I Petersburg, because our wait there was 
J short and it was dark, but on a return 
trip I became acquainted with several 
places, of interest. I was especially j 
j glad to visit Petersburg since it figured J 
so prominently in the Civil- War as 1 
Lee’s headquarters and as the site of 
the Battle of the Crater. 

Leaving Petersburg about 10:30 (for 
our train was late), we reached the 
little town of McKenney twenty-two 
miles southwest, and there were met 
at the train by Blackwell’s brother, 
who greeted us cordially and led us to 
the carriage nearby to carry us home 
to the farm in the country four miles 
out. In spite of the fact that it was 
chilly in the night air we enjoyed the 
short ride over very much, and indeed 
I felt glad that I was at last nearing 
our destination and was to spend a few 
I days in “Ole Virginny,” about which I 
; had heard so much. The stars were 
1 shining bright overhead, and as we 
drove along we burst forth into song. 
All went well until we were within a 
half mile of the house. Suddenly, as 
we were raptuously warbling, we felt a 
jolt and crash — the tongue of the car- 
riage hit a young pine tree just in 
front of us . While my two hosts were 
endeavoring to repair the damage, I 
was appointed to hold the mules. I 
was fulfilling my duty well, I thought, 
i when, lo and behold, these fiery steeds 
gave a quick jerk and I was carried 
several feet before I stopped them. 
After fumbling around there in the 
darkness caused by the trees, we at last 
managed to repair the harness enough 
to allow our going straight on home, 
and great were the expressions of joy 
when we arrived. I spent many pleas- 
ant days there at Blackwell’s home and 
I was able to meet many delightful 
and entertaining people during my 
visit there, all of whom treated me as 
cordially as if I had been a prince 



rather than a mere teacher, as I was. 

The farm where I spent the Christ- 
mas holidays is devoted chiefly to to- 
bacco raising as is the case with most 
of the farms around that section of 
Virginia. I was interested in finding 
out all I could about the raising and r 
marketing of that product since I had 
never before seen a farm of that char- 
acter. and I endeavored by questioning 
to get all the information that I could. 
During my stay there, we went out 
somewhere practically every evening to 
call on the neighbors of that vicinity 
and it was at that time that I was able 
to become acquainted with so many of 
the Virginia People. Ah! I shall never 
forget the manner in .which food was 
served to us at all times. Such a va- 
riety of meat, pork, fresh ham, chine, 
souse, pickled pigs feet; several differ- 
ent kinds of pie, cake and other deli- 
cacies; in fact, I was forced to refuse 
numbers of times from sheer inability 
to consume any more than my limited 
capacity would allow. Since I had 
taken my fiddle along with me, oft- 
times in the evening we would gather 
round the fireside and I was able, by 
my playing, to bring tears to the eyes 
of those who heard me (for in truth, 
they pitied me for making such 
sounds) and supreme joy to the souls 
of those who were deaf and unable to 
detect the slightest sound. We spent 
our time some mornings hunting or in 
target shooting; for we had an excel- 
lent little 22 rifle and a 38 calibre Colt, 
besides a shotgun. 

As we had decided when we first 
set out, we did not return the same 
way we went over, but came back by 
a different route. We came through 
Petersburg as usual, but changed at 
Lynchburg and boarded the C. and 0. 
by way of Clifton Forge. That trip is 
along the J-mes River Valley, and the 
scenery truly is beautiful. We had a 
two hours wait in Lynchburg and were 
thus able to see what manner of a city 
it is. Situated upon, and surrounded 
by. hills, it makes a pretty picture, and 
the manner in which the buildings are 
arranged is similar to that of a suc- 
cession of steps. Walking out upon the 
new viaduct there, we obtained a beau- 1 
tiful view up the James River Valley, 
and saw the Blue Ridge Mountains just 
ahead in the distance. The scenery 
along New River is also beautiful, and 
I was glad that I had decided to return 
the way I did. We are now back at 
Morris-Harvey College with a feeling 
of enthusiasm after such a delightful 
trip, and the memory of it will linger 
with me for many a day. Thus endeth 
a merry tale. 



THAT’S YOU 



Eyes that are filled with a hidden fire, 

Lips that are all one could desire — 
That’s you. 

Blue-black hair with a lustrous glow. 

The form of a Venus, dear, even so — 
That’s you. 

A voice like a violin’s muted strings, 

A laugh that is sweet and expressive of 
things — 

That’s you. 

The end of my life, the battles I’ve 
fought. 

The goal of my labor, the end of all 
thought — 

Is you. 



RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION. 



Aleck — “Young gentlemen, do you 
regard yourselves as connoisseurs of 
the classics?” 

Fresh. — “Naw, I ain’t calling myself 
a corner sewer of nothin’.” — Red and 



8 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Coining! Jan. 26, 27, 28 

RESERVED SEATS 
ON SALE TUESDAY 
Watch the Daily Papers 



ISTRIONE 

THE COZY THEATRE 

Monday-Tuesday 

Marshall Neilan's 
“BITS OF LIFE 
Cast of 20 Stars 

Wednesday-Thursday 

“THE SERENADE" 

All-Star Cast 

Friday-Saturday 
Ethel Clayton 

— in — I 

“EXIT THE VAMP” 

ORCHESTRA 



SHOWS 2 TO 11 P. M. DAILY 
Except Sunday 

. — — — ■ - —4 ! 

— - ! 

Capital City Grocery Co. 

Wholesale 

Groceries 

Warburton Plumbing 
Company 

PLUMBING. HEATING, WIRING, & 
TIN WORK 

Jackson. Miss. 



S. P. McRAE 

Can Fit College Men in Latest Style* 
of Clothing 

Agent for FLORSHEIM and “JUST 
RIGHT” SHOES, STETSON, NO 
NAME and CALEUR HATS; splendid 
line of NECKWEAR and HOSIERY 

Special Prices to College Men 



EAT AT 

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FOR EXPERT 
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go to 

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Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 
Watkins-Easterling Eldg. 



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Mississippi’s Finest Theatre 

The Greatest Picture Ever Sent on a 
Tour with a Brilliant Cast Headed by 
RUDOLPH VALENTINO 



LOCALS 



N. D. Guery, of Shuford, a graduate j 
of A. & M. College, has entered the ! 
college for special studies. 



George Boyd has withdrawn from 
school. 



Leigh Watkins has suffered lately 
from injuries received in the Inter- 
church basketball games. 



W. A. Scott, of Jackson, Miss., has 
entered Ole Miss to study that great 
profession. Law. — Mississippian. 



A hook agent representing Double- j 
day & Page Co. sold forty-four sets of 
books on the campus last week. 



W. H. Watkins, Jr., underwent an i 
operation for appendicitis last Satur- 
day. 






EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE. 



Mississippi Fire Insurance Company 

A 100^ Mississippi Institution, owned 
officered and managed by Missis- 
sippians for protection of 
Mississippians 



“Pussyfoot” Johnson is to speak at 
the First Baptist Church tonight. 



The Kit Kat Club met on Tuesday 
night with Prof. Huntley of the Acad- 
emy as host. 

Owing to changes in the student 
body, it was necessary to rearrange the 
chapel seating this week. 

The chess and checker tournament 
at Galloway lobby has been in progress 
for 168 hours now without intermis- 
sion. 



The Bobashela staff sent the bulk 
of the pictures for the annual to the 
engraver on last Saturday. This ship- 
ment was just in time to enable the 
management to get certain valuable 
discounts on the work. It is rumored 
that the beauty section in the annual 
this year will be the best ever. How- 
ever, the staff is holding an unbroken 
silence on the subject. 





CAPITAL NATIONAL 


BANK 


JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




United States, Hinds County and City Depository 


Capital paid in - 

Stockholders’ liabilities 

Surplus earned - 

Undivided profits, net — : ~ 


$200,000.00 

200,000.00 

225,000.00 

25,000.00 


ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 





“BARKER BREAD ” 

STANDARD OF THE WORLD 
It’s Best By Far — Ask the Man Who Eats It 

THE BARKER BAKERY 
Jackson Mississippi 



The faculty held a special meeting 
on Tuesday afternoon of this week. 



Dr. Sutton addressed the Preachers 
League on Tuesday night in an open 
meeting. His subject was “Prison 
Reform.” 



A. C. Gossard during his visit to the 
college on Tuesday addressed Dr. No- 
ble’s Sociology class. He also met with 1 
the local Y. M. C. A. Cabinet in the i 
afternoon to discuss with its members 1 
the problems to be met on the campus, j 



YESTERDAY 



At early dawn when I awake 
To first begin a new-born day, 
I quickly rise, and then I take 
A backward glance to yesterday. 



ANNOUNCING 

i 

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BOXED STATIONERY 

CRANE’S LINEN LAWN 
EATON’S HIGHLAND LINEN 
and other Fine Papers 

New Styles in Papers for Men 

Order Now 

Tucker Printing House 

JACKSON, MISS. 



The happy lessons that I learned 

From those events that happened Frank T Scott Charlie Scott CITY SHOE SHOP 



JACKSON, MISS. 




then 

Have left a mark that even burned 
To help me in the world of men. 

And so, as down life’s trail I go. 

To find that high and better way, 
I forward turn, but even so 
I can’t forget the yesterday. 



SCOTT & SCOTT Free shine to Millsaps Students for 

every job of shoe repairing. 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law 3Q6 Wegt Capito i St. Phone 2701 

Capital National Bank Bldg. Opposite West Jackson Fire Station 

jackson, M. .1. WALTHALL, Prop. 




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Voi. xiy. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, JAN. 27, 1922 



No. 15 



FAMOUS EXPLORER 
LECTURES AT NTURY 



Millsaps and Belhaven bring 
Stefansson to 
Jackson 



One of the most remarkable men 
that has been seen In Jackson in many 
days came here under the auspices of 
Millsaps and Belhaven Colleges last 
Tuesday. Mr. Vilhjalmur Stefansson, 
arctic explorer of renown, lectured at 
the Century theatre that night, giving 
the high spots of ten winters and 
thirteen summers spent beyond the 
polar regions. 

Mr. Stefansson is one of the most 
approachable men, is easily led into 
conversation, just so it is not on cer- 
tain subjects that are tabooed by him, 
and frankly expresses his opinion in 
regard to the question under discus- 
sion. As he expresses it himself, he 
has proven to the world that a man 
can live in the arctic circle, so he 
feels freer in expressing himself. He 
is a man of no mean ability at the 
outset. He is a college graduate, has 
taken two post graduate courses in 
different universities and has also 
taught in one or two. He is a mem- 
ber of the leading scientific clubs and 
societies in the world, a member of 
the American Geographical Society, is 
president of the Explorers’ Club of 
New York City and has the endorse- 
ment of the leading scientists in his 
work. 

He has spent about ten winters and 
thirteen summers in the polar region 
and during that time has lived almost 
altogether on seal meat and blubber. 
He proves to anyone that cares to 
look at him that he is a living ad- 
vocate of the meat diet where it is 
necessary. He is not a fanatic, but 
believes in putting the resources of 
the country where one is to proper 
usage. 

One gets a different idea of what 
the polar region is to hear him tell 
of it. Even if it is not the desolate, fear- 
ful region that James Oliver Curwood 
and others have pictured it, it is still 
a land of romance and promise. He 
states that it abounds in natural re- 
sources, that have only to be opened 
up and placed on the way to develop- 
ment and then the country will be 
(Continued on page 3) 

Preachers’ League Listens 
to Address by 
Sutton. 



At the regular meeting of the 
Preachers’ League on Tuesday night 
of last week, Mr. J. L. Sutton pre- 
sented a lecture on the "Cause and 
Cure of Crime.” He said that the 
causes of crime are three-fold — hered- 
ity, environment, and weakness. The ' 
manner of treatment of criminals by \ 
the State is unsatisfactory, according 
to Mr. Sutton. He thinks that better 
sanitary conditions should prevail in 
the prisons and that the suspended 
sentence, the indeterminate sentence, 
and the parole system should be 
adopted. 



STUDENTS DISCUSS 
PLANS FDR UNION 



Organization to Unify Stu- 
dents and Promote Loy- 
alty to College 

For some weeks a number of stu- 
dents have been discussing plans for 
organizing a college union to be mod- 
eled after certain organizations that 
exist and do such effective work in 
many of the larger universities and 
colleges of the country. Two weeks 
ago, the Purple and White took the 
matter up in its news and editorial 
columns, and as a result quite a bit 
of interest was aroused. 

Last Friday the student body was 
asked to remain in the chapel after 
dismissal. Professor White presided, 
and after introducing the subject with 
explanations, he asked for general dis- 
cussions. A number of students re- 
sponded, among whom were Mr. Lot- 
terhos and Mr. Sells, who expressed 
themselves as being highly in favor 
of the movement, and confident that 
much good would result therefrom. A 
(Continued on page 2) 

FACULTY BURLESQUE 
OF Y.W.IS SUCCESS 



Large Crowd of Students 
at Party at Galloway 
Hall. 



When we went in the front door, we 
thought of "honey and the honey- 
comb”, for the buzzing noise in Gal- 
loway Hall reminded us of bees hav- 
ing a wonderful time. Millsaps cer- 
tainly had a quorum that night — and 
the “Poverty Party” was “rich”! The 
young gentlemen went in by virtue of 
their wealth, while the girls were 
armed with mysterious packages that 
smelled like picnic lunches to im- 
aginative noses. 

Greetings and introductions were 
the first order of the evening. Maids 
and beaux sparkled with jewels and 
humor, conversation flowing as brisk- 
ly as Pearl River near-by. Prof. Patch 
and his partner, “San Luiz”, attracted 
interested crowds of spectators while 
they prolonged the, chess game to 144 
hours. Alee “pawed the ivory” while 
Freshman Brumfield sang “I Love 
You Truly” straight into the pink ear 
of a certain tiny brunette! Though 
Davenport didn’t know it, four couples 
sat on him all evening. 

At a critical moment there appeared 
in the doorway the very embodiment 
of good nature and cleverness — none 
other than Anna Belle — who sounded 
the clarion call to Chapel. Otherwise, 
it would not be Millsaps, you know. 
The front seats were reserved for 
the “sure-nuff faculty” who saw them- 
selves not “through a glass darkly”, 
but “face to face” in their everyday 
moods and attire. 

The Corps of Officers began to ar- 
(Continued on page 3) 



NOTED PROHIBITIONIST 
SPEAKS AT MILLSAPS 



Story of Fight Against 
Liquor Told Saturday 
Morning 

W. E. Johnson, known over a large 
part of the world as “Pussyfoot”, spoke 
to the students of Millsaps College on 
Saturday at the Chapel hour last 
week. He had delivered his address 
the previous night at the First Baptist 
Church. 

In his speech at the Baptist Church, 
Mr. Johnson began by summarizing 
the prohibition situation in the world 
today, and by congratulating the peo- 
ple of this state on being the first to 
ratify the eighteenth amendment. He 
then turned his attention to India, 
and gave a lengthy discussion of the 
situation in that country. 

India is all aflame with the “dry” 
movement. Illustrating with the well 
known joke, Mr. Johnson stated that 
India had never seen the drink “hip- 
popotamus” until the eighteenth 
amendment “circus came to town”. In 
India, the two thousand four hundred 
(Continued on page 2) 

HOW PUSSYFOOT 
GOT HIS NAME 



P. & W. Reporter Gets Dope 
on Early Life of Dry 
Speaker. 

Yes, “Pussyfoot” Johnson has been 
to Millsaps and has revealed to a 
special representative of the P. & W. 
the origin of his name. Really, the 
whole name was W. E. Pussyfoot 
Johnson. Now the W. E. and Johnson 
he claims to have received just as 
every other person gets a name, but 
the rest of the name didn’t come in 
the ordinary way. You understand, 
not like Alex, Bronco, or Ducky. Pus- 
syfoot carries with it the idea of a 
somewhat effeminate sneak; but Pus- 
syfoot Johnson doesn’t look like such 
a thing — most emphatically not. Just 
one look at those number twelves will 
convince you that they don’t imply 
such a thing as pussyfoot. 

The real origin of the name was 
given to the P. & W. and probably is 
here printed for the second time in 
history. Here it is. 

Some years ago a young man named 
W. E. Johnson was appointed by the 
Government as an officer in an In- 
dian reservation. Now, his job was 
not to go around and tell the Indians 
to be good, because that was impos- 
sible. A good Indian is a dead In- 
dian. Here is what this young man 
had to do. 

At that time there was a certain 
group of men, not connected with the 
government, who were trying to make 
all the Indians good Indians. They 
did it by selling the Indians a certain 
kind of poison called firewater. We 
call it bootleg whiskey, or just hooch. 
Mr. Johnson’s job was to get these 
(Continued on page 3) 



BASKETEERS MEET 
CENTENARY TONIGHT 



Second Game of Series to 
be Played on Sat- 
urday 

Coach Freeland has had the basket- 
ball squad practicing hard this past 
week in order to work out the rough 
spots caused by the “Ole Miss” games. 
Coursey and Poole have been on the 
sick list, Poole suffering from minor 
injuries received at “Ole Miss”, and 
Coursey being out with a severe cold. 
However, by the time this goes to 
press both are expected to be back 
in the lineup. Brooks, who was 
knocked out by some faculty ruling, 
is back in the lineup and will most 
likely be in the game tonight. His 
presence will add much to the 
strength of the team both defensively 
and offensively. The team is expected 
to show a great improvement over 
their playing against the University 
five. 

There is still some doubt as to 
whether the game will be played in 
the “gym” or on the city Y. M. C. A. 
court. The work on the indoor court 
has been progressing very slowly, the 
work being held up by the bad weath- 
er. l’he game tonight will be the 
first local game of the season and 
the student body is going to be out 
in full force to back the team to the 
limit. The Majors have a score to set- 
tle with the Centenary bunch and will 
fight to the limit tonight in an effort 
to defeat the Louisiana Methodists. 

Every member of the Royal Rooters 
Club is going to be there with his 
fighting “PEP”. ARE YOU? 



SCIENCE CLUB 

ORGANIZED HERE 



Junior and Senior Science Students 
Eligible. 

The members of the Junior and 
Senior science classes met after chap- 
el on Wednesday, January 18th, and 
organized themselves into a -Science 
Club. 

The meeting was called to order by 
Professor G. L. Harrell, who told of 
the purpose of the Science Club. He 
then called for nominations for offi- 
cers, and the following were elected 
to the various offices: President, F. 

J. Lotterhos; Vice-President, J. D. 
Musselwhite; Secretary, Miss Mildred 
Brashear; Treasurer, Daley Crawford; 
Historian, Henry Collins. 

The Club had its first regular meet- 
ing on last Monday afternoon in the 
Science Hall. The meeting was called 
to order by the President, who ap- 
pointed several committees. The com- 
mittees are as follows : Program Com- 
mittee, A. L. Joyner, Dr. J. M. Sulli- 
van, Miss Lucile Nail, H. B. Collins, 
and Prof. G. L. Harrell; Bibliography 
Committee, J. D. Musselwhite, Miss 
Daley Crawford, and Ross Moore ; 
Constitution Committee, G. M. Patch, 
(Continued on page 3) 




2 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



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Clothing Made to Measure by Ed. Y. Price & Co. 



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NEMO’S NOTES 



Numistopresc! (which Is Yiddish 
for Greetings!) 

An epoch-making discussion was in 
progress at Cannes. Premier Briand 
was there, fighting for the safety and 
security of France. His opponents 
could not turn him from his resolve 
to build for the future of his native 
land. He was waging his battle grand- 
ly, valiantly, victoriously — all for 
France. Then his political enemies in 
Paris — his own countrymen — began to 
criticize him, in a way known only to 
excited Frenchmen and Republicans, 
— and Briand quit. It is true that 
enemies within are more annoying 
than those without, — but the world 
loves a fighter. Where there is love 
there is hate, — and Briand was a quit- 
ter. 

Perhaps for the first half-session 
you have not made a record to be 
proud of. You may have failed. Don’t 
be a quitter — fight! Fight against the 
enemies within — conquer yourself! Re- 
member John Paul Jones, Captain Law- 
rence — and Fight! 



You never can tell what you may 
accomplish some day — then don’t. Do 
it. 



The late Senator Penrose said that 
his ideal Secretary of State would 
have been “Buffalo Bill.” 

M. Millerand: “Boy, page Wm. S. 

Hart.” 






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Love and kisses. I’ll see you next 
week. 




Every organization in school has to 
do with some one phase of college 
life. In organizing the entire student 
body we will have a union of greatest 
importance, since it will cover every 
phase of school life. This is the step 
which binds together all other units 
in school. 

Some of us want to know the pur- 
pose of this society. It should be this 
— the promotion of anything for the 
good of Millsaps. As we have said, 
its domain should extend over every- 
thing else in school. Smpposp the 
student body should find the Athletic 
Association not operating for the best 
interests of the school, then it should 
have the power of loudly protesting, 
at least. The troublesome faculty 
I might be dealt with in the same way. 

Just as a man is born the citizen 
of a state and cannot evade its laws, 
or the responsibilities of citizenship, 
so every student becomes a member 
of this society and cannot evade the 
responsibilities of membership. The 
question of the Honor System will 
come up sooner or later. There is 
no doubt that it is here to stay, but 
we are realizing that every one in 
school must co-operate in order to 
make it effective. Even if a man has 
no pride in his honor he must learn 
that the honor of Millsaps rests on 
him. 

Then our organization must be very 
elastic so as to lend itself to any 
scheme of general good and improve- 
ment — we could help build future gvtn- 
nasiums. Securing students and ad- 
vertising tbe college are worthy aims 
In doing this we want our name to be 
’ more than a mere name. As a suz- 



v: 



A 



Students Discuss 

Plans for Union 

(Continued from page 1) 

committee was appointed, consisting 
of Messrs. McGowan, Collins, McCor- 
mick, and Miss Stevens, to draw up 
a constitution for the proposed union, 
the same to be submitted at a subse- 
quent meeting. 

That there is great need in the 
college for such an organization, all 
students are agreed. A Millsaps Union 
will unify all the other organizations 
of the college as well as the indi- 
vidual students. Furthermore, it will 
serve as a boosting force for all col- 
lege activities, especially athletics,. 
In fact, this is thought to be the most 
important phase of the union, to boost 
the college and promote loyalty to its 
institutions. The Union does not pro- 
pose student government. 



Prohibitionist Speaks 

at Millsaps College 

(Continued from page 1) 

castes form a social phenomena not 
found elsewhere in the world. Each 
occupation forms a caste, and a per- 
son is born into an occupation just 
as into a certain family. The priestly 
caste is not necessarily learned, moral, 
or religious, but knows and performs 
the rites and ceremonies just as a 
carpenter is hired to build a house. 
The Hindu philosophy has a strong 
aversion to killing human, animal, or 
insect life. In swampy regions, the 
inhabitants wear cloths over the 
mouths in order to protect the mos- 
quitoes by keeping them from getting 
in their mouths. In spite of the fact 
that twenty thousand people die year- 
ly from snake-bites, they are slow to 
kill reptiles, especially the cobra, be- 
cause it sheltered .the infant Shefa 
from the sun rays. Man must tell the 
truth except when it is his duty to 
lie. 

The speaker spoke of attending a 
dinner two and a half hours long con- 
taining twenty-two courses. There are 
one hundred and forty-six different 
languages and dialects in India. He 
told of an amusing incident that oc- 
curred on account of the difficulty of 
translating some American idioms into 
Hindu. His interpreters interpreted 
one of his phrases concerning a lady 
who had been tickled to death so as to 
mean that she scratched herself until 
she died. In spite of the many castes 
and languages, India has a national 
spirit. 

There are two hundred and eighty 
temperance organizations in India, 
two hundred of which are affiliated 
with The Anglo-Indian Temperance 
Union. The three largest religions, — 
Buddhism, Hinduism, and Moham- 
medanism — have practiced total ab- 
stinence for two or three thousand 
vears. The “antis” have set up a 
campaign seeking to misrepresent the 
result or success of prohibition in 
America. India is looking up to Amer- 
ica, and, owing to the success of pro- 
hibition in America, Mr. Johnson pre 
dieted that India would soon follow in 
our lead. 

gestion — what do you think of The 
Millsaps Promoters’ League? Perhaps 
you can think of a better one. Abovi 
aR. in going into this thing remem 
ber that it is co-operation that counts 
We are living in an age of co-opera 
tion which makes possible all the bi| 
things of life. Our union will be ! 
failure unless everybody will take ai 
interest in it and work with the other 
for the common good. 



3 



Faculty Burlesque of 

Y. W. is Big Success 

(Continued from page 1) 

inhabited. It was a very true state- 
men that he made when he said that 
rive. William Guy, the champion of 
neatness, swept off the stage in grace- 
ful manner, while the profs, began 
to arrive by degrees. Dr. Mitchell 
with a tie whose color matched the 
blush in his cheek, and a pompadour 
comparable with a skating rink, an- 
nounced the song and the Glee Club 
in characteristic manner. "The Sun- 
beam Song” echoed loud and long. 

Prep, having sufficiently adjusted 
his shoestring and cigar, made an 
announcement. Dr. Watkins arrived 
late, manicuring his finger nails, and 
in a paternal manner whispered se- 
cret suggestions to each Faculty mem- 
ber. With eyes lifted heavenward. 
Prof. Sanders urged students to try 
for the Rhodes Scholarship. “Sully” 
breezed in, umbrella and hat in hand, 
and whined an invitation to the Y. 
M. C. A. He almost forgot the bud- 
ding orchestra. Prof. Patch called a 
meeting of the Co-eds — reason unde- 
cided. The boys were not entirely 
left out, for Mr. Black called the 
"Black List”. 

In a halting manner and a short 
coat, “Red” Harrell discussed simple 
harmonic motion in the complex 
“rocking-horse meter”. 

Ducky conducted roll call in his 
original way, and lent spice to the oc- 
casion by several impromptu speeches 
and frequent outbursts of oft-repeated 
wit. 

Coach Freeland wanted to see as 
much of us out as could possibly get 
to the ball game. 

Dr. Key with school-boy slouch and 
prominent jaw, ambled to the front 
where he, as Pres-i-dent of the M. 
A. A., advocated clean sports for Mill- 
saps. 

Clad in the garb of an artic ex- 
plorer, Prof. Bowen’s “cork-screw” 
mouth formed sentences requesting 
the return of The Lost Ten Tribes of 
Israel. 

Prof. White beseechingly solicited 
funds for Gym — who has chased Ham- 
let out of his heart. 

Our four ladies, Mrs. Clarke, Mrs. 
Ferguson, Mrs. Thompson and Miss 
Carrie made familiar announcements, 
after which Dr. Watkins lectured us 
on the respective subjects of street- 
car bulbs, radiator valves, and co- 
eds. His “That will do” told us that 
a social hour was then in vogue. 

Doughnuts, sandwiches and choco- 
late were served by co-eds, especially 
attractive that Wednesday evening, 
and merriment reigned for quite a 
while afterward. 

The Young Gentlemen saw the 
Young Ladies “safe in the arms of 
mother”, and returned home in the 
light of the moon. The old man up 
there winked at them and remarked 
in passing: “Say, ole tops, that was 

one ‘Y’-ld night”! 



Science Club Is 

Organied Here 

(Continued from page 1) 

J. T. Coursey, and Miss Ouida Craw- 
ford. 

The Club decided that 3:30 o’clock 
of the first Monday of each month 
should be the meeting time, and that 
the meetings should he held at the 
Science Hall. 



“Snap out of it,” he yelled, ripping 
open a box of Zu Zus.— Widow. 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



Famous Explorer 

Lectures at Century 

(Continued from page 1) 

“people will live anywhere the finan- 
cial returns are sufficient.” 

The one idea he was determined to 
get across was the “unlearning” of 
common conceptions of the North. In 
an interview he told a staff reporter 
that this one thing was the hardest 
problem he had to deal with on his 
lecture tour. He said the people of 
the South especially could not con- 
ceive of snow that was not slushy 
and inconvenient, and that could be 
put to proper usage. In his lecture 
of the evening he spent quite a time 
in explaining the vast land of the 
North to his audience. 

To hear Mr. Stefansson speak of 
his own beloved land it makes one 
thrill with the romance of a large 
area of land that could be put to 
practical use and that is alive with 
flowers, vegetation and all kinds of 
wild animals. This knowledge is quite 
a shock to most people; he said it was 
a shock to the people that were back- 
ing him in his work, for they did not 
feel that it could be possible that the 
conditions are not as they are pic- 
tured; when the greatest explorers of 
former times had not found this proof 
and had not used it. 

In his last expedition Mr. Stefansson 
was sent as a representative of the 
Canadian government. It paid all ex- 
penses and furnished all equipment for 
this great work and trip. He was the 
leader of a band of more than thirty- 
five capable scientists and all the nec- 
essary hand of followers. 

At one time he called for volunteers 
to go with him on a short expedition. 
This crew was to take thirty days’ 
rations and start out for a one or two 
years’ trip, living off the country as 
they could. Strange, not a one vol- 
unteered and he had to make the of- 
fer again, this time appealing to their 
sporting instincts and the chance to 
make a name for themselves. This 
bunch of men were reported as dead 
the first sixty days, but in a couple 
of years they showed up as well as 
ever and as big as life. And had also 
proven to the world that it could be 
done. 

This north country will one day fur- 
nish the meat for the United States, 
will be an oil land, a mining country 
and possibly a manufacturing section. 
Great are its possibilities. But great- 
er still is the man that had the cour- 
age to stand out against all opposition 
and prove to the world that it was a 
habitable land and one worthy of ex- 
ploration. A fine example of an in- 
domitable pioneering citizen is he. 



Freshmen Meet 



Another meeting of the White and 
Green (pure and simple) class was 
held Friday morning. President J. C. 
Galloway appointed the following com- 
mittees to arrange for the Junior- 
Freshman banquet: Finance Com- 

mittee, W. M. Lester, W. Spiva, Miss 
Bethany Swearingen, and Miss Maisie 
Simonton; Decorating Committee, 
Miss Madeline Bland, Miss Pauline 
Wills, Floyd Cunningham, and G. N. 
Lumpkin; Program Committee, Miss 
Winifred Hines, Miss Evelyn Flowers, 
and S. S. McNair. 



First Bo — “I may be poor now, but 
when I was young I had me own car- 
riage.” 

Second Bo — “Yep, and yer maw 
pushed it.” — Jade (Vanderbilt). 



SALE OF MEN’S WEAR 

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THE ECONOMY OF REAL QUALITY 

You’ll get both in this occasion. Our finest 
qualities in Suits, Overcoats and Furnishings 
are included in this selling. With a very few 
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| The College Photographer Jackson, Miss. 

NEW STUDIO— BEST IN STATE 



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How Pussyfoot 

Got His Name 

(Continued from page 1) 

men and to keep the Indians bad. 

Did he do it? Well, just listen. 
He had not been on the job a month 
before there appeared in conspicuous 
places about the reservation a notice 
to this effect — “$3,000 Reward For 
the Body of W. E. Johnson.” Two or 
three months passed. In the mean- 
while W. E. Johnson did all his work 
at night. Finally the news spread over 
the reservation that Johnson had been 
shot and one-third of the reward had 
been paid, and that the rest was to 
be paid that night on the delivery of 
the body. But the alarm was false. 
Pussyfoot says they made a mistake 
and got the wrong carcass. 

The next day the newspapers had 
glaring headlines that proved the 
falseness of the report — “Officer John- 
son Pussyfoots Into Camp and Cap- 
tures Five Bootleggers.” The head- 
lines also gave the famous prohibi- 
tionist a name. 



He — “They must be engaged; that’s 
the fourth dance he’s had with her 
this evening.” 

She — “That’s no sign.” 

He — “You think not? You don’t 
know how she dances.” — The Scalper 
(Texas). 



OUR TAILORING WILL 

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YOUR PATRONAGE EARNESTLY 
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WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
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FORD’S DRUG STORE 
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R. E. LANGLEY 

JACKSON’S LEADING FLORIST 
Plants and Cut Flowers of Quality 
Telephone 1017 
828 WELLS ST. 

A. H. FETTING 
Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Established 1873 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

DIAMONDS— FINE MOUNTINGS 
213 North Liberty Street 
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4 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

Published Weekly by the Students of Millsaps College 
Founded by Junior Class of 1909 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

One Subscription ?1.25 

Additional Subscription 1.00 

Apply to Business Manager for Advertising Rates 



Entered as Second Class Matter, January 2, 1909, at the Jackson Post 
Office, under Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 

Please address business communications to the Business Manager. 
Matter for publication must be in the Editor’s hands before noon of each 
Monday. 





STAFF 














































ASSOCIATE EDITORS— J. W. Sells, E. K. Windham, M. B. Swearingen. 
REPORTERS — H. H. Knoblock, W. S. Phillips, J. B. .Shearer, A. L. Joyner, Leigh 
Watkins, J. T. Coursey, T. J. Ray, T. M. Davenport, R. H. Moore, J. D. Mullen, 
D. F. McNeil, J. S. Barbour, Miss Mildred Brashear, Miss Delta Stephens, Miss. 
Maxine Tull. 




MANAGEMENT 












FT Ft Onllins 
















_ O. K Hebert 





THE GIFT THAT IS HIS 



All men may be born equal, but few remain equal through 
life. Even in the earliest childhood, the differences that belong 
to individuals begin to appear. The one shows the ability to 
accomplish and to win; the other demonstrates weakness and 
the lack of success-making traits. These variations in human 
character and in human mind seem to exist naturally. And yet 
there are other differences between people that do not exist 
naturally. These other contrasted qualities come from the con- 
ditions in which men and women live, especially from the cir- 
cumstances in which they live the years of youth. 

The college man says, ‘ ‘ This statement is true, but wherein 
does it concern me?” Here lies the point. The college man is 
especially fortunate in being permitted to spend his youth in 
surroundings designed, by the wisest and best men of modern 
times, to fit him for the highest happiness and usefulness. He 
is placed in such a situation largely without effort on his part. 
It has happened that his parents are far-seeing in the desire to 
make him successful, and so have given him the wish to seek 
an education. Then they have made it possible for him to sat- 
isfy that wish. The wonderful opportunity that comes to the 
college man is chiefly due to other people than himself. 

Therefore, we speak of “the gift that is his;” therefore, 
we see that obligation rests upon him, the college student. 
Would he accept the gift of a youth spent in college, and squan- 
der the privilege, the duty, of using that gift to make himself 
different from others in being more useful ? Or, would he ac- 
cept the gift, and, by industry through gratitude, develop his 
individuality in order to make himself and his fellows happier ? 

The gift belongs to the college man already. The right use 
of it is his for the grasping. 



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ANNOUNCEMENT 



Numbers of articles have been contributed to the Purple 
and White recently by the students of the college. We are sor- 
ry that all of these cannot be published, but such is of course 
the case. The contributors are hereby assured that their work 
is appreciated, and they are requested to keep it up. The Clark 
Essay Medal is awarded each year for the best four articles 
published in this paper, and the contest is open to all students 
in the college. This reward should encourage the further ef- 
forts of student writers. 



Do not forget the Millsaps Union. Just as soon as a con- 
stitution is adopted and the Union is thoroughly organized, 
the school will begin to feel the benefits. Cooperation is never 
a bad thing unless the object for which It exists is bad. And 
the object of the Union will not be bad; it will be entirely good. 
Unity and progress for Millsaps is certainly a laudable aim. 



Why is it that the faculty has never taken steps to place a 
copy of the rules of the college in the hands of every student? 
Not one student out of fifty, and not one professor out of five 
can state exactly what the rules concerning special examina- 
tions are. 



Harris ’ 

STORE FOR MEN 
218 W. Capitol St. Jackson 



Royal Hotel Building 
Jackson, Miss. 



.** 

Jackson Paper Company 

H. T. NEWELL, Pres, and Mgr. 

WHOLESALE 

‘ PAPER, PAPER BAGS, TWINE, STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS. j 
j TABLETS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, PAPER BOXES, WOODENWARE, 
ETC. 

| Telephone 106 j 

JACKSON PAPER COMPANY 

120 S. GALLATIN STREET JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

“MISSISSIPPI’S PAPER HOUSE’’ . 






THE PURPLE AND WHITE 




J 71 

PHi 




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When you see well dressed men 
you instinctively think of Strat- 
ford, because these clothes are 
famed for setting the styles. 
Our new Fall and Winter dis- 
play of 

£§>tratforb Clotfjes 

suits and overcoats will repay 
inspection. 

Come now while the assortments 
are complete. 

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Jackson, Miss. 



WRIGLEYS 

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Representative 

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Practice Limited to Surgery 
and Consultation 

Fifth Floor Century Building 
JACKSON, MISS. 



MORE ABOUT MANNERS 

In last week’s issue of the Purple 
and White there was an article signed 
by a co-ed, lamenting the conditions 
at Millsaps from the standpoint of 
manners. 

It must be said that every day a 
lack of manners is displayed by both 
boys and girls. Such a condition 
should not exist in an institution like 
Millsaps College. It costs nothing but 
just a little effort to be polite. But 
regardless of whom it may be, it does 
cost a great deal to be impolite or to 
show the lack of a polite attitude to- 
ward one’s fellow man. It may not be 
expensive in silver and gold, hut in 
the esteem of our fellow man it is 
extremely so. Napoleon as a student 
at France’s military school had to face 
the rebuffs of his fellows, but only a 
few years later they were anxious to 
be held in esteem by him. 

Boys are taught that a girl should 
speak first. Most hoys like to speak 
in passing, but few will speak when 
they feel that their greeting is not 
welcome. Many a girl passes without 
seeing, and the boy she passes goes 
by with a considerably lowered opin- 
ion of her and of her manners. In a 
school of Millsaps’ size every girl 
should know every hoy and every boy 
should know every girl by this time. 
They are all engaged in the same 
business and the right kind of co- 
operation is just as essential to the 
success of that business as to any 
other. 

A co-ed laments the fact that the 
hoys do not call to take the girls to 
college activities. Can the boy be 
blamed when lists are passed around 
for the boys to check the girls and 
then some of the girls offer excuses? 
Some girl may say, “But an impos- 
sible boy checked me.” She knew 
that boy was in school when she sub- 
mitted to her name going on the list. 
Why did she allow her name to go 
on there when -such was the case? 

Is it any wonder that the boy hesitates 
to extend his chivalry In such circum- 
stances ? \ 

There is no boy nor girl In Millsaps ; 
today but can and will rank high if j 
he or she wants to do so. There is j 
no body of whom the true worth may 
be determined very largely in the real j 
scale of values by his social position. < 

The attitude of a great many boys , 
is summed up in some of George With- 
ers’ lines wherein he says: 

"If she be not such to me. 

What care I, how good she may be?” 

Or at the close of another of his 






f SMART CLOTHES 



FOR 



“If she be not such to me, 

What care I, how kind she may be?” 

In early childhood, the writer, like 
a great many other boys and men, 
gained the impression that womanhood 
is a thing sacred and to be respected 
and protected. Imagine a man’s dis- 
appointment at finding so many wom- 
en and girls who do not appreciate 
the respect that good men would hold 
for them; who direct his opinions in 
the opposite direction to his earliest 
impressions, gained under the direc- 
tion of a chivalrous father from the 
examples of good and pure woman- 
hood about him. 

The fault is not all due to the 
girls, and any body who Is truly re- 
sponsible in any way for the tearing 
down of the respect that our fathers 
(Continued on page 6) 



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The Leading Hotel of Mississippi 

The Edwards 

• The Edwards House Co. Proprietors 
John L. Ware, Mgr. Jackson, Mississippi 



MILLSAPS BOOK DEPOSITORY 

a 

% Property of Athletic Association 

| Books, Stationery, Pennants, Athletic Goods 

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• * » - 

■ MLLSAPS COLLEGE 

A. F. Watkins, President 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 
A HIGH GRADE COLLEGE 

Situated at the Capital of the State. Location high, dry and 
healthful. Entrance requirements and curriculum same as other lead- 
ing colleges and universities North and South. The very finest moral 
and religious influences. Courses leading to B.A., B.S., M.A., and M.8. 

MILLSAPS ACADEMY 

Under separate faculty and dormitory management. Unsur- 
passed training for college. 

Thirtieth session began September 14, 1921. 

For Catalogue and other information, address 

J. REESE LIN, Secretary, Jackson, Miss. 



| FURNITURE for your HOME, ROOM or OFFICE 

j Taylor Furniture & Carpet Co. 

1 South State Street JACKSON, MISS. 



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6 



THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



OLE MISS COPS 
TWO FROM MAJORS 



Early Season Losses Fail to 
Discourage P. & W. 
Five 



The Millsaps passers lost two games 
to the University five at Oxford last 
Friday and Saturday nights. Although 
the scores are overwhelmingly in fa- 
vor of Ole Miss, the games were hard 
fought. The first game went to the 
Oxford boys by the score of 34 to 12. 
They had the Majors on the go all of 
the time, but in the last half the Mill- 
saps passers showed some real fight- 
ing stuff and made the Ole Miss five 
hustle around. The second game also 
went to the University by a 24 to 8 
score. The entire Millsaps team 
played a good hard game, but showed 
throughout both games the lack of 
practice and the result of having 
played on a small court. The court at 
the University is much larger than 
the one used here and at times the 
Majors seemed lost on the larger bat- 
tle ground. Ramsey led in the scor- 
ing for the locals, making four field 
goals. Coursey was next with one field 
goal and five foul goals. The playing 
of Montgomery and Flowers featured 
for the University quintette. 

When everything is taken in con- 
sideration — that it was our first game ; 
the lack of a court to practice on; 
one of the best men out of the game 
— it was not such a bad defeat after 
all. By the time the University five 
visits our campus, we hope that the 
Majors will be in shape to turn the 
trick on them very much like they 
did last year. 

FIRST GAME. 

Line-up : 

OLE MISS. MILLSAPS. 



Ford 


F. 


Coursey 


Montgomery 


F. 


McCormick 


Flowers 


C. 


Ramsey 


Scruggs 


G. 


Reeves 


Schwartz 


G. 


Poole 


Substitutes : 


Hillman 


for Ramsey; 



Corley for Coursey. 

SECOND GAME. 

Same line-up with the exception of 
Hillman at guard for Millsaps. 

Referee: Coach Sullivan (Ole Miss). 



Results of Church 
Basketball 



EXCHANGES 



Faculty Members of Emory 
Attend Northern Meetings 

Several members of the faculty of 
Emory University attended meetings 
of the different national departmental 
associations during the holidays. 
Among these associations wera : The 

Modern Language Association, held at 
Baltimore; the American Historical 
Association, held at St. Louis; the 
American Law Schools Association, 
held in Chicago; and the Anatomists 
Association, held at New Haven, 
Conn. Reports from these me a tings 
indicate that Emory is gaining in pres- 
tige and fast forging ahead in the 
educational world. 



According to the Tar Heel, twenty 
professors of the science departmant 
of the U. of N. C. are recognized by 
the "American Men of Science" as 
among the leading American sci- 
entists. — Ex. 



“A” Rating for U. of Fla. 

The Committee on Admission from 
Higher Institutions of the University 
of Illinois has placed the University 
of Florida on the "A” rating for stand- 
ard colleges during the past two 
months. 



Music Department Reor- 
ganized at A. & M. 

Over twenty separate courses in 
music have been outlined by Pro- 
fessor Kalinowsky at A. & M. College 
which will be offered to all students 
next session. In addition to this he 
is offering training in piano, voice, 
orchestra and band instruments, for 
which college credits will, be given. 



According to the Reveille, Tau Sig- 
ma Pi, a newly organized engineering 
fraternity at L. S. U., was granted its 
charter by the faculty in December. 
It is composed of advanced students 
in engineering and is petitioning Sig- 
ma Tau, a national honorary engineer- 
ing fraternity. 



The Kappa Sigma house at Sewanee, 
one of the most modern and up-to-date 
houses on the campus, has recently 
been finished and is now being oc- 
cupied by the boys of the chapter. 



Tuesday, January 17. 

First Baptist 46, Central Presbyte- 
rian 6. 

Second Baptist 49, St. Andrews 18. 

Friday, January 20. 

First Presbyterian 31, First Chris- 
tian 15. 

Galloway Memorial 46, Capitol Street 
Methodist 10. 



PRESSING NEED. 



Rastus: “What fo you all got your 

pants on wrong side out, niggah?” 
Sambo: “Cause Ah’s goin’ to de 

ball tonight an’ Ah wants to get de 
bag outa de knees.” — Orange Peel. 



Journalism Dept, at L. S. U. 
Amon? 29 Best in Country 

Of 206 universities atid colleges in 
this country whose journalism depart- 
ments were studied in a survey re- 
cently completed by the Um’ -rsity of 
Wisconsin, only 29 Ayere placed in 
class "A”, and L. S. U. was one of 
the 29. 

The department of journalism was 
established at the University in 1912. 
It now offers six professional courses, 
and a number of students of journal- 
ism now hold positions on newspapers 
throughout the state. 



“My brother takes up Spanish, 
French, Italian, Hebrew, German and 
Scotch.” 

“Goodness, where does he study?’’ 
“Study? He. doesn’t study.. He 
runs an elevator. ’’—Voodoo. 



The flapper says she only acts like 
an old maid thinks. — Ex. 



Wrecker — “That girl’s just like an 
ocean liner.” ’ - \ . 

Necker — “How’s that?” 

Wrecker — “JuSt a little tug will get 
her started.’— Purple Cow. 



Special exams have been in progress 
this week and will continue: into the 
next. 



PATRONIZE 
PURPLE AND WHITE 
ADVERTISERS 




R. H. GREEN 



Wholesale Grocer 

Feed Manufacturer < old Storage 

Jackson, Miss. 



More About Manners 

(Continued from page 5) 

held for pure and upright woman- 
hood is absolutely unfit for society 
of any scale. The girls here and else- 
where must do much to gain and keep 
the respect and admiration which is 
unquestionably the birthright of pure 
womanhood. Girls, it is up to you 
to get back to the position your moth- 
ers held and when you start the boys 
will go with you gladly. 



FATE 



A Short Story. 

Harvey Luther looked up from the 
map spread out upon the table before 
him. His eyes encountered those of 
a rather tall, chestnut haired young 
( woman who had just entered the room. 
Contrary to expectation, her eyes were 
not brown but were a deep blue, giv- 
ing one the impression of deep pools, 
hidden in the depths of which lay 
much that the ordinary glahce could 
not fathom. He smiled as she ap- 
proached him, and pushed back his 
chair from the table. She stood be- 
side him for several minutes without 
speaking, looking with interest at the 
map upon the table. At first, she had 
been unable to understand the mean- 
ing of the various symbols and figures 
drawn upon it, but now she knew that 
j each red circle upon it stood for the 
location of an oil well belonging to 
the oil syndicate of which her husband 
was the head. 

"Well, dear,” he said, “the comple- 
tion of our Garston No. 5 last week 
makes our twenty-third producing well. 
Isn’t it all wonderful?” 

“Yes, dearest, it IS wonderful! It 
seems almost like a dream to me. 
Tell me. Harvey, what ever induced 
you to come to Texas? What was it 
that made you leave college before 
finishing, and how did you happen to 
get into the oil business? You know, 
you have never told me much about 
your early experiences, and I have 
often wondered what kind fate di- 
rected you to me.” 

Harvey Luther pursed his lips, and 
began to whistle softly. The tune was 



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X5 Flatiron Bldg., New York 

SPALDING FOR SPORT 




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Insist Upon 

“SPALDING’S” 

SATISFACTION IS INEVITABLE 
Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

130 Carondeiet St. — New Orleans 



that of “The Waltz We Love.” His 
arm encircled the waist of his wife 
as he drew her to his side; and she 
settled herself comfortably beside him 
In the big armchair, as he began to 
speak. 

“It was four years ago that the de- 
sire to get away from the routine of 
college life first struck me. I -was a 
Junior at the State University, and 
had formerly had the ambition to be- 
come a lawyer. My father was great- 
ly pleased with my work, encouraging 
me at all times in the pursuit of my 
studies. Everything seemed to point 
to my graduation the following year, 
and I had already received an offer 
of a position in the office of my Dad’s 
lawyer when I had finished. But one 
night, I attended a dance given by 
the Cotillion Club of Madison, and 
there my whole life was turned. 
Louise Lorrance was the cause of it 
all, for from the first moment that 
I saw' her, I was her slave. She smiled 
at me, and I felt as if I had been 
(Continued on page 7) 





THE PURPLE AND WHITE 



7 




Prof. Lin — “What do you consider 
the most memorable date in History?” 
Fresh Cross — “The one Antony had 
with Cleopatra.” 



“Wash” Bailey announces that he 
has a letter with no address on it 
which he would like to deliver to th« 
one it is intended for. 



Hebert— “I don’t think I will go 
to town to hear Stefansson’s lecture.” 
Brantley — “Why not?" 

Hebert — “Stone said he would hear 
him if he was in seventy-five miles of 
Jackson, so I know I can hear him 
out here.” 



When your board is due 
And your room-rent too 
And the hock-shop’s got your shoes 
When your friends won’t lend 
Nor your parents send 
Then you’ve got those 
Campus blues. — Ex. 



Dr. Sullivan — “What is the radical 
of nitrils?” 

Dillard— “It is S. O.” 

Dr. S.- — “When did it become so? It 
wasn’t so yesterday.” 

HEARD WHILE DANCING 
Shorty Craft— “Oh! B, these shoes 
have started squeaking.” 

B. Graves — “Naw, they’re not; it’s 
the floOf.” 



If a body, meet a body 
With .a little rye 
Should a body pas3 a body 
Specially if he’s dry? 

Should that body 
Give a body 
A little o’ the rye. 

Or should that body 

Make that body ’ ' £ ' \ ' 

Get the cash and buy? — Ex. 



There was a Professor named Patch, 
In whose chair a boy put a fnatch; 
When Professor did sit 
The match it was lit — 

Look and if his pants didn’t catch. 



STILL SILENT 
Department Store 
He stepped before 
A girl with eyes of blue; 

It wouldn’t hurt 
He thought, to flirt; — 

She looked him through and through. 
“Hello,” He said — 

She cut him dead; 

Enraged he turns and flies 
Behind him there 
The model fair 
Stares with her waxen eyes. 

— Sun Dodger. 



The onion sings in yonder tree 
The cream-puff gallops o’er the lea 
And all around me nature thrills 
Of Carter’s little liver pills. 



Mr. Carr did float a loan 
And with it bought a saxaphone; 
Now this is mighty nice, all right. 
But durned if I can sleep at night. 

Mr 



Does a ship have eyes when it goes 
to sea? 

Would you draw a rabbit on a man’s 
bald head just to give him a little 
hare? 

Is a fish crazy when he goes in 
Seine? 



Electric lights are said to grow 
from bulbs. 



The President (a few years hence) 
— “Where is the Army?” 

Sec. of War — “He’s gone out row- 
ing in the navy.” — Ex. 



Leigh Watkins says, “Many a poor 
fish has been caught — not in fish nets, 
but by hair nets. 

Many of the students hid their hair 
tonic after listening to “Pussyfoot” 
Johnson’s lecture Saturday. 



Freshie — “For the love of Mike lend 
me two bits.” 

Soph — “Who is this fellow Mike?” 
— Medley. 



CINCH 

Whatever trouble Adam had, 

No man in days of yore 

Could say when he had told a joke. 

“I’ve heard that one before.” 

— Burr. 



Junior — “I had something taken 
from me today before I got it.” 

Fresh — “What was it.” 

Junior — “A photograph.” 



B. C. Ford (translating Spanish as- 
sisted by well-meaning friend) “The 
Spanish dancer gracefully shook her 
cascarets.” 



Mildred — “Have you ever been to the 
Asylum.” /. 

Manning — “Yes, several times.” 
Mildred — “Who got you out?” 



Whatever may happen since our coun- 
try has gone dry, 

The sailor will have his port and the 
farmer have his rye; 

The cotton man will have his gin, and 
the seacoast have its bar. 

And each of us will have a bier no 
matter where we are. 

" — American Legion Weekly. 



Son— “What is the missing link 
father?’' V. > 

Father (Who has just taken up golf) 
“The golf link son.” 



■The management wish to thank 
those who handed in jokes the last 
week and hope they will continue to 
lend their aid to make the paper bet- 
ter. 



FATE 

(Continued from page 6) 

transported to Heaven. She had been 
visiting, in Madison for nearly three 
weeks, and was to leave the next day 
for her home in Oklahoma City. I 
had qot met her previously due to the 
fact that this was the firs